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jimi
04-03-09, 15:04
Would your engine run on it?

sailorman
04-03-09, 15:16
A Fordson Tractor would

Twister_Ken
04-03-09, 15:40
Ask your Esso Blue dealer.

ashonavega
04-03-09, 18:02
[ QUOTE ]
Would your engine run on it?

[/ QUOTE ]

The old grey Ferguson tractors ran on paraffin but they had spark plugs and they also had a smaller petrol tank. They had to be switched to petrol a few minutes before stopping so that the next start was on petrol.

As a young boy, I often forgot, and got thoroughly cussed for carelessness.

Ash

Edit: Just googled and it would appear that that it wasn't paraffin but TVO (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tractor_vaporising_oil)

brianhumber
04-03-09, 18:53
Ah the joys of changing over to TVO too soon and popping and banging till the manifold warmed up.

I always drained out the bowl of TVO before starting cause this saved a bit of petrol which was much more expensive.

These engines and the two cylinder JAP engine on the Bamford bailer would also run on Paraffin but TVO was cheaper.

I have in an emergency ( like oh dear the drum of diesel is empty and the next delivery from Singapore is a week away) run a diesel on Paraffin - you just add lube oil and mix well. Keep swilling to keep the two mixed up or they seperate.

B

ADLS
05-03-09, 04:45
Ford tractors had em as well, oh that steel seat mounted on what could be said as a leaf from a rear axle. Luckly the tractor was only used to turn hay. The newer Fords and MF were used for the real work, the farm had 15 tractors in all.

BoyBlue49
05-03-09, 14:45
In answer to your origional question - NO. Despite all the above reminiscing about old tractors (sounds like Dads Army). Don't tell him your name Pike !! They started on petrol with spark plugs then when the engine was hot changed over to parrafin.
Would you run your car on it --------- No I don't think so.

sailorman
05-03-09, 14:47
i ran an old Co car Escort on turps once i had ran low on petrol 2 mls from the garage. it knocked a bit & smoked like a [--word removed--] /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

AntarcticPilot
05-03-09, 17:02
Embarrassing admission!

Snow-scooters run (or ran) on petrol. I was refuelling several of them in Svalbard, in an area where there were drums of several different kinds of fuel, including JP-4 (aviation fuel for jets - basically paraffin!). By mistake I filled the snow-scooters with JP-4.

The snow-scooters started and ran successfully, but produced clouds of white smoke, and a rather unpleasant smell!

Refueler
05-03-09, 20:26
[ QUOTE ]
Embarrassing admission!

Snow-scooters run (or ran) on petrol. I was refuelling several of them in Svalbard, in an area where there were drums of several different kinds of fuel, including JP-4 (aviation fuel for jets - basically paraffin!). By mistake I filled the snow-scooters with JP-4.

The snow-scooters started and ran successfully, but produced clouds of white smoke, and a rather unpleasant smell!

[/ QUOTE ]

JP4 is high grade Kerosin at the top end of the kerosin range. Hydrocrabon fuels span a considerable range and when a grade fails its spec it can drop into a lower group. IE gasoil ( you call it Diesel ) can fail its lowest spec and then it gets classed as high grade fuel oil.

Onto arctic and severe cold weather regions due to the extremes of temp - it is not unknown for certain arctic grades of "Diesel" to be not diesel and more lighter products more akin to kerosin than what you would normally term diesel.

But you never read that here.

If anyone thinks they can now run their engine on kero without worry - think again. We blend to regional use. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif

aquaplane
06-03-09, 13:24
One of our Scout parents had a "one man one van" set up in the '70's, when the oil crisis was on. He couldn't get diesel so he blended paraffin, which was a bit too thin, with engine oil to thicken it up. It was about 5 paraffin to 1 oil I think, but it was a long time ago. His 3 tonner ran, but gawd knows what it did to his engine, and it was probably dearer than Derv too.

Refueler
06-03-09, 17:55
We have one blend that is used for low grade power engines (industrial). It is based on Light Cycle Oil (best way to describe is to say like a 3in1 oil !) .... + kerosin + black heating oil.
It will run any older diesel engine - it runs my Perkins 4-107 ok. But it does make soot !!

DaveS
07-03-09, 21:26
[ QUOTE ]
Ask your Esso Blue dealer.

[/ QUOTE ]

That brings back memories. IIRC:

"They asked me how I knew / it was Esso Blue / I of course replied / with lower grades one buys / smoke gets in your eyes"

TheBoatman
09-03-09, 01:37
I think that you're talking about TVO (Tractor Vaporising Oil).

fisherman
09-03-09, 08:57
Stand by for thread drift.

I worked on the local campsite in the 60s, I was 15, using a Bedford CA van, various mowers and a Ferguson petrol/TVO tractor. One day I hitched this up to a big rotary mower driven off the PTO, and cleared an area of thicket to provide for tents, the owner was delighted. Drove back in the compound, trod on the clutch, the tractor carried on, up the hedge til just about vertical, then stopped and slowly trickled back down. I think it's called 'live drive', the mower connected to the back axle. What about the safety/insurance position though, driving this stuff round among the punters.

The smell of TVO always brings back memories of kelvin Engines (http://www.sky-net.org.uk/kelvin/petrol/poppet/index.html) . I had a 12/14, also a Ricardo 30. When steaming this would play up about every hour, I had to dive below, switch to petrol and open the decompressor/primer taps. There would be popping and banging, flames spurting at the deckhead, then it would settle down for another hour or so. The 3 litre 12/14 would start just turning the flywheel rim by hand, as it did one day when I was painting it. Check out the 30hp poppet, 14.472 litres, weighing over a ton.

cliffordpope
09-03-09, 09:05
If you read old boating literature from the 30s motor cruisers often had what were described as petrol/paraffin engines. As has been pointed out, these were spark ignition engines, started on petrol, and swapping over to TVO when hot.
TVO was often loosely referred to as paraffin, but it was not the same thing as domestic paraffin.

My Ferguson tractor manual explains;

In the UK some petrol tractors were modified, either in the factory or after-market, to run on TVO. This involved a lower compression ratio and a water-heated inlet manifold.
Some export models were further modified to run on "lamp oil", which really was domestic paraffin. But the compression ratio had to be lowered even further, to about 4:1 I think.

ashonavega
09-03-09, 15:39
[ QUOTE ]
Stand by for thread drift.

Drove back in the compound, trod on the clutch, the tractor carried on, up the hedge till just about vertical, then stopped and slowly trickled back down. I think it's called 'live drive', the mower connected to the back axle.

[/ QUOTE ]

Drifting even further

I think it was just the opposite - the (always) live pto was connected to the engine so pressing the clutch stopped the drive to the back axle but the pto and mower connected to it would still have been driving.

I only drove tractors as a schoolboy, and that ended some 38 years ago so my recall of detail may be hazy.

I seem to remember later tractors (what was the bigger one after the Ford Dexta? ) had a two stage clutch - pushing it down so far would disengage the drive to the wheels and it had to be pushed down fully to disengage the PTO. I seem to remember that the PTO lever on earlier tractors had two 'ON' positions - in one position the pto was controlled by the clutch and in the next it drove constantly.

Being able to stop the forward drive whilst the kit connected to the pto is still operational was a great advantage if the mower, baler, potato lifter, etc was threatening to become choked or overloaded.

Ash

floatything
09-03-09, 17:10
[ QUOTE ]
If you read old boating literature from the 30s motor cruisers often had what were described as petrol/paraffin engines. As has been pointed out, these were spark ignition engines, started on petrol, and swapping over to TVO when hot.
TVO was often loosely referred to as paraffin, but it was not the same thing as domestic paraffin. <SNIP>



[/ QUOTE ]

I have in the shed a Watamota Shrimp engine with variable pitch prop. It is designed to run in exactly the same way - 2 tanks, start up on petrol then switch over to paraffin when warm. It's a beautiful bit of machinery - lots of brass and it's a bit sad it hasn't been fitted in a boat. It's not suitable for Floatything though. Any ideas what to do with it?