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View Full Version : HARD WATER - FILTERS etc?



Wino
04-10-10, 12:45
We are finding that our water system - pipes, immersion heater, pumps etc - are suffering from severe calcium deposits.

Has anyone had experience of water treatments capable of handling this problem on a boat?

Earlier I was told of an electrical system that is supposed to work by altering the electro chemical compounds in water. I can not help but think it sounds like a gimmick.

Experience and/or opinions would be appreciated.

Marine Reflections
04-10-10, 13:15
Possibly try filtering the water (prior) to filling up tanks.

A 3 stage reverse osmosis system used for filling up fish tanks etc, are fairly cheap, it will take a very long time to fill your tanks up but at least it will be near 00ppm, (no calcium or poop) the more money you spend, only really allows more flow (faster filling). :)

rivonia
04-10-10, 16:30
We are finding that our water system - pipes, immersion heater, pumps etc - are suffering from severe calcium deposits.

Has anyone had experience of water treatments capable of handling this problem on a boat?

Earlier I was told of an electrical system that is supposed to work by altering the electro chemical compounds in water. I can not help but think it sounds like a gimmick.

Experience and/or opinions would be appreciated.

Hi the electrolosis system does work but not very very efficient. The best system is a pre-filter before the tank. We have installed an american filter that takes out most impurities as well as calcium and chlorine. We purchased it in Gib and bought a spare as it lasts a year.
Good luck

Peter

blueglass
04-10-10, 17:36
Long term - maybe you need to look at the water supply you are using to fill your tank. Here in Gouvia Corfu, there are two alternatives - free general use water on the pontoons or metered drinking water which has to be paid for. I've seen the same thing in the SofF where you are too. The free water is fine for washing , cooking etc. We have a general ecology filtration sytem for our drinking water so I could use this free supply , but I won't put in my tanks because it is rock hard. Many others do and I can't help but wonder what they are doing to their pipes /pumps and especially immersion heater elements.

poter
05-10-10, 00:42
Most filters only take out impurities, chlorine, etc. To get soft water ie no calcium you would have to get a softener -(expensive for a boat)

We put in a Liff filter (http://www.liffwaterfilters.co.uk/index.html) for drinking water only & that seems to work OK, I am going to try one of the Liff Limefighters on the water tanks but I suspect that they are a bit of a gimmick..

No satisfactory answer I am afraid.

caribbeancat
09-10-10, 15:48
You could try the spotfree systems - we've had some good results with that although in truth, I think desalination is probably the only way to get rid of Cal.

Marsupial
12-10-10, 15:46
We are finding that our water system - pipes, immersion heater, pumps etc - are suffering from severe calcium deposits.

Has anyone had experience of water treatments capable of handling this problem on a boat?

Earlier I was told of an electrical system that is supposed to work by altering the electro chemical compounds in water. I can not help but think it sounds like a gimmick.

Experience and/or opinions would be appreciated.

The electrical systems have been shown to work but the effect lasts for a few seconds only - just long enough for the "treated" water to pass through an instantanious water heater and not leave deposits. For a storage type system such as a boat these electrical systems would not be any help. The only thing you can do is desalinate sea water (RO water maker) or use a water softner on "tap water", both will eventually remove the calcium deposits you have in the pipes, pumps and cylinders.

I ve only done this on a caked up washing machine (it did work) but a few kilos of mashed lemons in the system will remove the calcium - but the water will taste of lemons for a while after! good luck!

ccscott49
13-10-10, 05:06
Long term - maybe you need to look at the water supply you are using to fill your tank. Here in Gouvia Corfu, there are two alternatives - free general use water on the pontoons or metered drinking water which has to be paid for. I've seen the same thing in the SofF where you are too. The free water is fine for washing , cooking etc. We have a general ecology filtration sytem for our drinking water so I could use this free supply , but I won't put in my tanks because it is rock hard. Many others do and I can't help but wonder what they are doing to their pipes /pumps and especially immersion heater elements.

I'm also in Gouvia and only use the non potable for washing the boat, but even then the final rinse is with the potable stuff as the limescale on the boat is horrendous when the non-pot stuff dries, even with a chamois. The water in Gouvia is quite expensive, I reckon the most expensive I've ever had to buy. None of that "brackish" water is going in my tanks either, I've also found a lot of water in the islands is very hard, even if potable. So use the watermaker a lot whilst cruising, it can be used when charging batteries, washing etc.
The solution for us, (because the leccy is included in mooring charges) is to put the non-pot stuff through my watermaker, which makes 90 litres an hour, which two hours every few days is adequate for us liveaboards and as an added bonus, keeps the watermaker in good nick, not requiring flushing or putting in preservation. (watermakers like to be used)

rivonia
13-10-10, 06:47
I'm also in Gouvia and only use the non potable for washing the boat, but even then the final rinse is with the potable stuff as the limescale on the boat is horrendous when the non-pot stuff dries, even with a chamois. The water in Gouvia is quite expensive, I reckon the most expensive I've ever had to buy. None of that "brackish" water is going in my tanks either, I've also found a lot of water in the islands is very hard, even if potable. So use the watermaker a lot whilst cruising, it can be used when charging batteries, washing etc.
The solution for us, (because the leccy is included in mooring charges) is to put the non-pot stuff through my watermaker, which makes 90 litres an hour, which two hours every few days is adequate for us liveaboards and as an added bonus, keeps the watermaker in good nick, not requiring flushing or putting in preservation. (watermakers like to be used)

The water that you put through watermaker-does it have any chlorine in it? the reason I ask is if there is any trace of chlorine it will destroy the membranes.
We have pickled the water maker and now use both tanks with potable water through our special filters which makes the water very nice.

Peter

vyv_cox
13-10-10, 08:42
The water that you put through watermaker-does it have any chlorine in it? the reason I ask is if there is any trace of chlorine it will destroy the membranes.


I thought watermakers would run on seawater? 2.5% sodium chloride. I suspect that very many fresh water supplies contain some sodium chloride, it being a very common mineral.

ccscott49
13-10-10, 08:49
The water that you put through watermaker-does it have any chlorine in it? the reason I ask is if there is any trace of chlorine it will destroy the membranes.
We have pickled the water maker and now use both tanks with potable water through our special filters which makes the water very nice.

Peter

I dunno where this water comes from, but I can discern no chlorine in it, but thanks, I will ask now. Maybe test it (somehow) Havent installed the hose yet.