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Csail
29-08-11, 08:33
If regs are international why are the cardinals reversed in some places?

sarabande
29-08-11, 08:42
In 1980, the IALA ( International Association of Lighthouse Authorities) was set up to unify the buoyage systems across the world. There are now two similar systems, IALA 'A' and IALA 'B'.

B is used by North and South America, Pacific areas such as Japan and Phillipines. The rest of the World uses the A system.


So the reason is historical.


Or have you come across the Welsh variant ? ;)

guernseyman
29-08-11, 08:58
If regs are international why are the cardinals reversed in some places?

1. The regs do not apply, as such, to inland waterways.

2. I don't know how many countries there are but there are 193 member states of the UN and 172 that are members or associate members of the IMO which publishes the reg. Clearly some countries do not officially subscribe to the regs.

jimbaerselman
29-08-11, 09:21
It was Europe vs USA, round one. Both agreed a singe universal system was appropriate.

However, each was already committed to a different lateral system (green port in; vs red port in), and neither would agree to being committed to the expense of changing their investment. The idea of flipping a coin, and both sides contributing to the cost of change (the logical approach) either evaded them, or was dismissed on the grounds that the costs would never be agreed.

So we have a single universal system; either the USA way if you're in their sphere of influence, or the European way . . .

ChrisE
30-08-11, 21:22
If regs are international why are the cardinals reversed in some places?

I'm not sure that the cardinals (ie those things with black and yellow) are reversed. What is reversed is channel markers and confusingly the shapes stay the same, just the colours are reversed. For all the reasons that other have posted.

In reality it makes no real difference you just sail in or out of the harbour following the buoys. In the US they chant the mantra red right returning, ie reds are to starboard on the approach to a harbour.

srm
31-08-11, 14:15
If regs are international why are the cardinals reversed in some places?

Perhaps you can give specific examples of reversed cardinal marks - A south mark positioned to the north of a danger would obviously be dangerous, though I can think of one example where a south beacon is just on the south edge of the danger, so technically correct, but the safe channel is to the west of both.

As explained by previous posts the only difference between IALA A and B is in the latteral marks. Cardinals (N,S,E or W of the danger) are the same in both systems.

mikemanor
31-08-11, 15:40
1. The regs do not apply, as such, to inland waterways.
.

Not strictly true. IRPCS Rule 1a states: (a) These rules shall apply to all vessels upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith navigable by seagoing vessels.

Rule 1b allows inland waterways authorities to make special rules

(b) Nothing in these rules shall interfere with the operation of special rules made by an appropriate authority for roadsteads, harbours, rivers, lakes or inland waterways connected with the high seas and navigable by seagoing vessels. Such special rules shall conform as closely as possible to these rules.

An example is the River Cam, a tributary of the Great Ouse which goes out to sea at The Wash. The Cam Conservators Byelaws state:

4.5 The master of a vessel on any part of the River shall observe and obey the International Regulations for Collision at Sea with the exceptions, additions and variations contained in these Byelaws.

MontyMariner
31-08-11, 16:01
Clearly some countries do not officially subscribe to the regs.

Maybe some landlocked countries don't feel the need.

mikemanor
31-08-11, 16:07
Maybe some landlocked countries don't feel the need.

Thats true. IRPCS apply on Inland Waterways connected to the High Seas and navigable by seagoing vessels. My point was that they do apply to Rivers in the UK such as the Thames, Great Ouse, Ouse, Cam, Trent etc, and I think they should apply to Inland waterways in landlocked countries that have waterways navigable by seagoing vessels flowing through them and out to sea.