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Redfox226
08-01-15, 16:46
Hi

Anyone out there know how to remove a Torqueedo prop which is spinning on the shaft? Is there an easy way to prevent the shaft spinning to remove the end nut?

TIA
David

FWB
08-01-15, 17:25
I'm interested to find out too.
I've found this suggestion from a forum

""Hi David, a guy from Torqeedo with whom i had an interesting talk at the "Boot" fair in Duesseldorf in january proposed the following procedure. I never tried it, so i'm talking like the blind man about colors! Connect the battery and a controller (tiller)to the motor and power on the controller. Running the motor at low speed and returning to stop makes the motor stall (electrically braked) for a few moments. Use this time to loosen the nut. From normal use i know this brake effect, when setting power to zero while driving the prop stops for, lets say one second, and then it commences revolving as it is driven by the water flow. Again, I never used it for loosening the nut and I'd definetely wear working gloves.... If you use a ratchet with a 17mm socket-wrench and you let run the prop counterclockwise it shouldn't be too dangerous. On the other hand... why not running the motor clockwise and loosen the nut with motorpower ;-) Be careful! Frank - See more at: http://www.panbo.com/archives/2011/07/the_travel_1003_a_serious_case_of_torqeedo_love.ht ml#sthash.rppwSCKl.dpuf ""

Redfox226
08-01-15, 18:50
I'm interested to find out too.
I've found this suggestion from a forum

""Hi David, a guy from Torqeedo with whom i had an interesting talk at the "Boot" fair in Duesseldorf in january proposed the following procedure. I never tried it, so i'm talking like the blind man about colors! Connect the battery and a controller (tiller)to the motor and power on the controller. Running the motor at low speed and returning to stop makes the motor stall (electrically braked) for a few moments. Use this time to loosen the nut. From normal use i know this brake effect, when setting power to zero while driving the prop stops for, lets say one second, and then it commences revolving as it is driven by the water flow. Again, I never used it for loosening the nut and I'd definetely wear working gloves.... If you use a ratchet with a 17mm socket-wrench and you let run the prop counterclockwise it shouldn't be too dangerous. On the other hand... why not running the motor clockwise and loosen the nut with motorpower ;-) Be careful! Frank - See more at: http://www.panbo.com/archives/2011/07/the_travel_1003_a_serious_case_of_torqeedo_love.ht ml#sthash.rppwSCKl.dpuf ""

Thanks foeu, I'll give it a try tomorrow!

David
Red Fox 226

Colvic Watson
08-01-15, 19:29
Crickey watch your fingers! That's a very powerful hand masher you're playing with. Would you do it on a petrol outboard running but hopefully in neutral?

dartmoor
09-01-15, 10:22
Bit of a nightmare that one - I used to have a 1003, and mine broke its shear pin because it couldn't cope with a patch of seaweed (which wasn't that bad, and would have been mashed by a petrol outboard).

I managed to move the nut by a quick sharp jerk with a spanner. I don't like the suggestion above as your fingers and hands are precious and you are relying on the circuit integrity not to restart the motor (which although extremely unlikely, is not a chance I would want to take).

Don't over tighten the nut when you do it up again.

Having shear pin on this motor is to me a serious design flaw - they ought to have used splines. When the retail price is the most expensive ever per HP for a small engine, they ought to do job properly down to that level of detail.

At the price they ask for it, it ought to be near perfect!

Redfox226
09-01-15, 10:26
Bit of a nightmare that one - I used to have a 1003, and mine broke its shear pin because it couldn't cope with a patch of seaweed (which wasn't that bad, and would have been mashed by a petrol outboard).

I managed to move the nut by a quick sharp jerk with a spanner. I don't like the suggestion above as your fingers and hands are precious and you are relying on the circuit integrity not to restart the motor (which although extremely unlikely, is not a chance I would want to take).

Don't over tighten the nut when you do it up again.

Having shear pin on this motor is to me a serious design flaw - they ought to have used splines. When the retail price is the most expensive ever per HP for a small engine, they ought to do job properly down to that level of detail.

At the price they ask for it, it ought to be near perfect!

Thank you -
Agree totally with the design vs price!!

David
Red Fox 226

Redfox226
09-01-15, 11:34
Just had the Charity and Taylor Engineer on the phone - very helpful, but says the only way to remove a 'spinning' prop is to remove the back cover and hold the motor. Unfortunately this voids the warranty!

David
Red Fox 226

pvb
09-01-15, 12:14
Might it be possible to use a dremel-type tool to cut a slot in the end of the shaft, so that a screwdriver could hold it whilst unscrewing the nut? I have a Torqeedo 1003 but haven't had to take the prop off yet.

Redfox226
09-01-15, 12:21
Might it be possible to use a dremel-type tool to cut a slot in the end of the shaft, so that a screwdriver could hold it whilst unscrewing the nut? I have a Torqeedo 1003 but haven't had to take the prop off yet.
Thanks prv
I will definitely try to slot the shaft (for the next bit of East Coast mud) once I've got the thing apart - not a lot of space to get a milling attachment to get in there - I suppose I could always cut the prop off as it's fairly ragged at the edges - I'll see today....

pvb
09-01-15, 12:51
Thanks prv

Errr.. pvb

dartmoor
09-01-15, 12:56
I sympathise with Redfox here - unbelievable that replacement of a shear pin could be this drastic. What on earth were those Germans thinking of in designing an outboard like that??

Redfox226
09-01-15, 13:25
Errr.. pvb

Apologies - dyslexic!

Just got the old prop off without voiding the warranty! You will need: A Vibrating multitool with decent saw blade (Saeger saw), a wedge/screwdriver, and a hammer to cut a segment from the broken prop and remove it from the shaft!
Shear pin had broken.

pvb
09-01-15, 13:28
Just got the old prop off without voiding the warranty! You will need: A Vibrating multitool with decent saw blade (Saeger saw), a wedge/screwdriver, and a hammer to cut a segment from the broken prop and remove it from the shaft! Shear pin had broken.

Well done!

dartmoor
09-01-15, 13:30
But what happens to a poor Torqeedo user whose shear pin breaks out on the water? Basically even if they have a spare one, they are well and truly stuffed

Redfox226
09-01-15, 13:36
But what happens to a poor Torqeedo user whose shear pin breaks out on the water? Basically even if they have a spare one, they are well and truly stuffed

Quite - some kind of shaft lock (like the dremel or angle grinder) would solve the problem neatly. I think I'll try out my German and contact Torqueedo direct.

RupertW
09-01-15, 13:41
Quite - some kind of shaft lock (like the dremel or angle grinder) would solve the problem neatly. I think I'll try out my German and contact Torqueedo direct.

Do let us know - Im sure it will happen to ours eventually.

dartmoor
09-01-15, 16:45
Do let us know - Im sure it will happen to ours eventually.

Sadly it will if your Torqeedo meets seaweed...

pvb
09-01-15, 16:54
I notice that Torqeedo have modified the prop fitting - the conical washers have been replaced by solid stainless washers. Don't know whether this is an improvement or not. You can buy the new washers separately - http://www.seamarknunn.com/acatalog/Special-Thick-S-S-Washer-TQ060_00061.html

FWB
10-01-15, 12:13
Just wondering the implications of replacing the shear pin with one that didn't shear. The prop would be damaged but presumably the motor would survive the impact? Would then be a simple job to remove and replace the prop. Expensive though.

dartmoor
10-01-15, 12:19
Interesting...

The Torqeedo prop is fairly brittle plastic, so there is a measure of protection in that if it struck a hard object, the prop would take a lot of the impact and shatter itself.

Obviously your proposed move though would invalidate the warranty! The Torqeedo shear pin is surprisingly thin from memory - must be a reason for that, and it could be that the manufacturers deem the motor vulnerable.

Redfox226
10-01-15, 13:16
Just wondering the implications of replacing the shear pin with one that didn't shear. The prop would be damaged but presumably the motor would survive the impact? Would then be a simple job to remove and replace the prop. Expensive though.
Unfortunately that wouldn't resolve the problem of being unable to hold the shaft to undo the end nut which is nyloc - possibly a castle nut and split pin might make it easier?

FWB
10-01-15, 13:22
Well the shaft would be held still by the prop. So you could hold the prop and undo the nut. Which is why I suggested it.

Redfox226
10-01-15, 15:43
Well the shaft would be held still by the prop. So you could hold the prop and undo the nut. Which is why I suggested it.

Unfortunately I found with mine that with the pin sheared, the prop just spun on the shaft with the extra torque required to remove the nyloc nut.

FWB
10-01-15, 15:59
Unfortunately I found with mine that with the pin sheared, the prop just spun on the shaft with the extra torque required to remove the nyloc nut.

Yes that's why I suggested having a non shearing pin. The damaged prop would hold the shaft so that the nut could be undone easily.

DownWest
10-01-15, 16:05
Local friend asked me to help remove his prop after he had knocked most of a blade off touching a wooden post in the river. Used a gear puller and the reason it was sticky, was that the pin was steel and rusted.. Not broken. What are the pins you guys are using made of? His Torqueedo dates from around 4/5 yrs ago.
DW
Edit:
Quote[Yes that's why I suggested having a non shearing pin. The damaged prop would hold the shaft so that the nut could be undone easily]end quote.

Props not cheap, unlike pins. But it does sound a bit odd that unless one alters the shaft, one cannot change the pin on the water.

dartmoor
10-01-15, 21:35
As sometimes dealers etc read this site, and I think Torqeedo UK do, come on, lets have a response from the German's who claim this engine is "technologically superior" to everything else on the market. BTW never not been able to get a prop or prop spring off a seagull, using the most basic of tools - British technology, (v v old) btw...

oldvarnish
11-01-15, 12:22
come on, lets have a response

I agree. This is bit worrying. I bought a T last year and I think they are great. But this seems to be an important flaw in the concept.

DavidSMN
18-06-15, 12:00
Looks like you got it sorted anyway. The best way way is to shock it, to get it started, either with a socket and mallet or an air tool, if you have one.
If it is stubborn, then normally a little pressure forcing the prop over gives enough friction to get it started. Gloves are a really good idea as the prop is sharp, but I would definitely have the battery completely disconnected and certainly not think about running it with my fingers near the prop!.

FWB
18-06-15, 12:06
Looks like you got it sorted anyway. The best way way is to shock it, to get it started, either with a socket and mallet or an air tool, if you have one.
If it is stubborn, then normally a little pressure forcing the prop over gives enough friction to get it started. Gloves are a really good idea as the prop is sharp, but I would definitely have the battery completely disconnected and certainly not think about running it with my fingers near the prop!.

So how do you undo the nut if the pin has sheared other than by running the motor while having a socket on the nut ? Holding the prop won't work if the pin has sheared the nut will just spin the shaft.

DavidSMN
18-06-15, 12:28
I have not had one that I cannot undo by just leaning on the prop. But as you suggest it would be great to have another way. The problem would be the same on any other motor apart from you can lock the shaft on a petrol engine by putting it in gear. The electric motor has to be sealed and has little internal friction so there are not many options without introducing power to lock/turn it, which has obvious safety implications. It does have to have a drive pin, so splines could not protect enough but maybe this is something for the future.
For now I have not had to resort to a air ratchet or even a mallet and everyone I have explained this procedure to, have succeeded. So hopefully it is not too bigger problem for the owners.

FWB
18-06-15, 12:36
I don't understand "leaning on the prop". If the pin has sheared the prop is not connected to the shaft. A way has to be found to hold the shaft while trying to undo the nut. The prop is out of the equation since the pin has sheared.

DavidSMN
18-06-15, 14:58
Maybe I am not explaining very well. Even though the pin has gone you can normally get enough friction on to the shaft to get the nut to come undone. I do this by grabbing on blade and pulling it up whilst leaning on the other with your arm, pushing down, turn the socket with the other hand. Shock it if it doesn't go straight away.
Regards
David

taybo
08-08-16, 16:43
I just had to remove the prop on my 1003S. Hit some mud in the shallows and the pin sheared. I found it pretty easy to remove the prop nut. Since my pin was sheered the prop just spun freely so couldn't use it for leverage to spin the nut off. Just put my 17mm socket on the nut and cranked it up in reverse. Nut spun right off. Lucky I guess. The unit is only 2 months old, so maybe no corrosion build up around the nut helped. I have to say I am shocked how thin the diameter of this "cylinder pin' is. No wonder it sheared. I suppose it is preferred over motor or gear damage, but it sure looks pretty brittle given its diameter. Tech service here in the US is shipping me some spares. May call them back and say send me more. See pics here:

//https://goo.gl/photos/eM7ZGL9XmbqqvNdp8