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linnerr
29-11-04, 14:48
Wondered if anyone could help.
My husband and I have been into boating for a few years and we are seriously considering selling our house and our 25ft boat and buying a 50-60ft dutch barge.
However we want to moor on Gloucester and Sharpness Canal and at present there are no residential moorings - is it possible to live aboard but only on non residential moorings?
We do know that there are several people living permenantly on their boats there.
We wouldn't be moving about - we would be staying at a specific mooring site.
What are the implications for working, doctors, and eventually when we have a family - registering for schools etc.
Can anyone give us some advice?
Many Thanks
Lindsay.

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ccscott49
29-11-04, 15:02
Dont know the answers to your questions, but why would you want to live on a boat, that doesnt go anywhere? Surely a house would be better?

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linnerr
29-11-04, 15:05
We will cruise at weekends/holidays but want to live on a boat rather than a house.

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ccscott49
29-11-04, 15:08
Ah! Good on yer! I liveaboard (in the meddy) and know the benefits and the downsides, but not in the UK, when I was there, I took care of my own affairs and basically lied, a lot, to the authorities!

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BIG_PLANS
29-11-04, 15:13
My wife and I live on our boat in a 'normal marina', just get the ok form the owners.
We have registered at Doctors, dentist, electoral role etc no problems.
The Residential Boat Owners Assoc has a great book that tells you all the pit falls.
We too boated for a few years before taking the plunge and selling up. We started looking at dutch barges, but decided on on motor cruiser. Would be happy to answer any questions if you want, PM me.

Mike

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linnerr
29-11-04, 15:19
Thanks for reply - so do you give your address as the Marina and then collect post etc from there?
How do find life onboard as apposed to bricks and mortar?
Did you bring up children at all on the boat?
Lindsay


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BIG_PLANS
29-11-04, 16:09
Our address is the boats name at the marina, not c/o. We have even managed to get a new credit card based on that address. Getting extra loans or credit cards can be a problem. We dont 'do' kids, got dogs instead!!!

There where a few problems along the way, when I notified our car insurance of out change of address (More Than) they cancel the policies from midnight that day because we lived on a boat. Fought paying council tax and won.

We have a land line telephone, broadband internet and sky tele, what more could you want. One of the best things we have done is get a larger shore power supply, we have got about 7kw now, so we can have everything going at once. We used to have labels on everything, " before using microwave turn off immersion heater" etc.

The summer onboard was great, I don't think we switched the tv on for a month, just sat on deck watching the world go by, the marina is a great community. The winter (so far) has been ok, spent a lot more time inside, the boat is warm and cosy.

Good luck if you decide to do it, its hard work but a great way of living, all we want to do is retire and be on the boat. Only 30 years to go!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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snowleopard
29-11-04, 16:24
don't know the status of that canal but on british waterways in general you can live aboard while cruising from place to place but i think you need theri agreement to become a permanent fixture.

life on board for long periods can be very pleasant as long as you get things properly sorted, it's a whole world from the 2-weeks-a-year semi-camping that most of us have.

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BIG_PLANS
29-11-04, 16:33
Totally agree with you, we have spent 15k Turning our boat from a holiday/weekend boat to a live aboard. Cooker, fridge, freezer, washing machine, tumble dryer, generator, new heating system, new calorifier, insulation, new showers and toilets, battery charger etc.

You can put up with a bit of hardship for weekends and holidays but its our home and its got to be right.

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Alastairdent
30-11-04, 12:29
Canals are a difficult one. If you are continuously moving along (not back and forth) the BW network, liveaboard is no problem. Permanent mooring . . . don't tell council or BW that you live there and keep on good terms with the local BW workers.

A liveaboard boat has different needs - no more sleeping space, but it should be permanent made-up beds. Really well aired clothes storage. Somewhere to keep laundry. Bigger water tanks. Reliable heating that can be left on, unattended.

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Velorum
01-12-04, 23:26
I lived aboard for all of 1996. Moored at a marina on the Thames and used a friends house as my official postal address (for a small fee!). I never discussed it with the marina staff but Im sure that the on site security/odd job man (who lived aboard officialy) knew what I was up to. A number of other peolple were up to the same thing. The marina mangement seemed happy to turn a blind eye providing that rubbish wasnt left on the side, washing on lines etc - ie it didnt look as though you were living on board!

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hlb
03-12-04, 22:47
Dont think theres a problem if you move about now and then.

And I've got just the Dutch Barge for you.

http://arweb.co.uk/aralbums/album07/Dscn0037.jpg

http://arweb.co.uk/aralbums/album07/DSCN0036.jpg

<hr width=100% size=1> No one can force me to come here. I'm a volunteer!!.

Haydn

deborahann
03-12-04, 23:45
that's my barge on hlb's posting, we don't live on my boat & yes its sadly up for sale, but lots of people unofficially live on their boats on my marina. (nw england) they seem to have to move off at times, and a blind eye is most definately turned. British Waterways don't like (actually for some very good reasons) live aboards unless you move for all but a few weeks a year.

wish you well...


<hr width=100% size=1>deborah on delft.
Nothing to do with Mucky Farter or hlb in drag

ChesapkLady
04-12-04, 06:50
What a lovely boat! Is it really for sale? And what are the details . . . engine? age? interior accomodations? size? asking price?
I am not in the market for something like this myself right now (how I wish!) but will be giving a seminar in January in Florida to "slow boaters" interested in travel in Europe by barge. Among many other aspects of the subject, I will be covering purchase and ownership of boats in Europe. I would love to show pictures of this lovely craft as an example of the unique experiences that might be had for those interested in "low adventure," as I call it.
Thank you,
Peggy

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deborahann
05-12-04, 13:08
If you have a look at the web site www.harralbrokerage.co.uk click on boats, then boats over 40,000 my boat is the most expensive one, so quickest way to see the details is move the side thingie down to the bottom. if you click on the picture of delft you will see a couple of shots of the interior. There's another dutch barge for sale also on the web site, and lots of other boats, so it should help you with your topic of sourcing & living on boats.

Reading whats on there web site re Delft going to have a word with them monday, as they aren't really being as positive as they should, maybe its due to the other dutch barge that they have for sale, in that they are being given lots of these to sell new by the builder, perhaps a conflict of interest. Not just saying this but my boat is a much higher spec. by a much better builder. hey ho.

anyway good luck with your talks


<hr width=100% size=1>deborah on delft.
Nothing to do with Mucky Farter or hlb in drag

ChesapkLady
06-12-04, 05:20
Your boat is STUNNING! More than worth the price I'd say, for the right buyer. And of course that's always the way when buying or selling a boat, isn't it. My last boat I sold for $10,000 more than I paid for it, and I'd owned it for 5 years.
I'm going to show off these pictures of your boat, if that's all right. It is a beautiful example of what can be possible.
Good luck with selling it, and thanks for the encouragement and help.

Peggy

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deborahann
07-12-04, 00:31
well so far never lost money on a boat (unlike houses & cars) think i might have sold it now, fingers crossed, let you know....

<hr width=100% size=1>deborah on delft.
Nothing to do with Mucky Farter or hlb in drag

snappy890
11-01-05, 20:04
I was interested in your comment that you fought the Council Tax authorities and won. Following a tip to the local council by a local 'rat' (I'm being polite here) live aboards at my marina - myself included are likely to face some kind of investigation in the near future. Staff at our marina office say there's a form from the Council waiting for us. Have you any advice based on your experiences you might care to share?