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Yanina
13-02-06, 18:07
Does anyone have any experience of using either a Rocna or a buegel type anchor?

Speed
14-02-06, 17:25
We have just imported a 25kg Rocna for use on our working yacht based in the west of Scotland after trying just about every type over the years.

As far as I am aware it's the first to reach the UK in this way, although maybe someone out there has brought one in on their boat.

Either way it comes highly recommended, and we'll be giving it a bashing this year - watch this space!

Paw Paw
15-02-06, 08:47
although I have never used a Buegel anchor several friends of mine, who are blue water cruisers and who's opinion I respect, swear by them... Prefer them to a CQR. If I were buying a new anchor I would certainly consider a Buegel.
Michael

charles_reed
15-02-06, 10:29
michael's comment.

Mainly Germans who swear by them. Apparently good for thin sand on hard rock - the most difficult scene for all anchors

smb
15-02-06, 11:19
Look forward to your updates. I'm in the market for a new anchor and in the mood to try something other than CQR.

Not sure I can justify a Spade so a Delta was leading the field until I heard of the Rocna. Probably looking at the 20kg version as it should give more than adequate holding for 99.9% of the time and remain manageable on the bow.

Steve

GMac
16-02-06, 03:22
Having had a lot of experiance with the Bugel, Delta, CQR and Rocna (amongst others) over the years, this what I would fit if it were my boat.

Rocna
Bugel
Delta
CQR
In that order. Note: I'm talking genuine not knock-offs. I'm more than happy to put 2 doz cold, or warm if your in the UK :-), beers on a bet with anyone that the Rocna will out perform the others easily.

I don't make anchors but use them. As much as one or 2 people, with interests in anchor making, on this forum go on about 'new generation' anchors, I must firmly agree that they do in fact work and do so very well.

I'm in NZ where we have the pleasure of a choice of the new generation ones easily avaliable. Myself and a few mates with the new ones will never go back to the old dark days of plows and the like. The plows and the like were and still are 'OK' but why settle for that when you can just as easily have 'damn good'.

PS. I'm not a gambler and don't make bets I could lose :-)

Just one, completly convinced, mans opinion.

david_brighton
16-02-06, 10:14
Any chance of a picture of this Rocna?!

Bejasus
16-02-06, 10:22
see it here. (http://www.rocna.com/home.php?region=global&PHPSESSID=ca52551c9af8932e8 8481f2b08e13c18)

Bejasus
16-02-06, 10:25
so what makes the Rocna superior to the Bugel and the Sarca, which are similar type anchors?

Just curious.

craigsmith
16-02-06, 10:56
[ QUOTE ]
so what makes the Rocna superior to the Bugel and the Sarca, which are similar type anchors?

Just curious.

[/ QUOTE ]

The Rocna is in one sense a more sophisticated version of a Buegel. Where the Buegel is simply a flat plate of steel with a hoop and straight bar welded to it, the Rocna is a good deal more complex. The fluke is concave, it has tip-weight (thicker toe than heel), the shank is better designed to fit bow rollers, it has skids to assist setting. In all aspects (expect perhaps price /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif) the Rocna is a more effective design. Think of a Buegal as a primitive ancestor of the Rocna.

The SARCA is not at all a similar type to either the Buegel or Rocna. Don't get distracted by the roll-bar. The SARCA is effectively a highly modified plough (with a convex blade) and works on a completely different principal. Reviews of it are mixed.

/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Speed
16-02-06, 14:41
Re GMC - I hope this will be our experience too - I have used an oversize CQR on our yacht for years, and have not had too many problems, but it does have its limitations, not least of which is that it takes time (and experience) to get it to dig in quickly, especially if there's a bit of weed about. The Delta is undoubtedly better, but the Rocna certainly looks to have every chance of outdoing either.

We'll be using ours every day between May and September in the Hebrides, where there is every type of bottom imaginable (often with weed) so this will be a real test of its abilities. We also have a big Fortress (kedge) and a big fisherman for rock and heavy weed, so we'll see whether we need them.

If anyone is interested we'll put a post or two on this site as we find out its qualities.

We are currently sorting out its mountings on our bow roller, and it does look a simpler set up than some of the others mentioned due to the geometry.

Good
16-02-06, 15:09
Is it sold her in Europa (Rocna)?

smb
16-02-06, 17:03
I understand it is ordered directly from New Zealand via the website http://www.rocna.com I have enquired today about a price for delivery to Greece.

steve

Bejasus
16-02-06, 17:15
Hi Craig, nice reply from the horse's mouth, so to speak. Thanks.

hylass
22-02-06, 19:46
SEE THE SWORD ! (http://www.spade-anchor.com/Site%20anglais/US/sword.htm)

timchapman
22-07-06, 10:46
People claim their anchors are good because they hold their boats to the seabed. I would imagine all anchors with a sufficent rode would do this 95% of the time. We should be looking at anchors from the opposite angle and focusing on equipment that frequently DOESN'T hold boats to the seabed. If people experience frequent dragging with their tackle and report it on this or other forums that would be much more helpful to the consumer.
For one I can say that my CQR happily skips across the seabed if I give it too much reverse after dropping it, however once it bites it stays for ever, even when the tide turns 180 degrees, (never really understood why it does but I suspect that the anchor doesn't rotate with the tide at all and the chain weight and friction alone holds the boat).

Metabarca
23-07-06, 09:45
I for one am rather fed up with having to dive down to check all is well with my CQR, and usually finding it isn't. A new anchor will be fairly high on my shopping list and I'd be grateful for any practical experiences reported on the forum from users with one of the new anchors.

Bejasus
23-07-06, 10:21
Lucien, a bit off topic I know, but on your Notice to Mariners pages, I noted that the price quoted for Brijun(Brioni), was 150 Euros per day. Is this correct and if so, surely it is very expensive, and swinging moorings at the same rate? Not a place to visit in a hurry, I think.

Brijun(Brioni)
The daily rate has now gone up to Euro 150 and there are now 5 swinging moorings at Mali Brijun, at the same cost.

Metabarca
23-07-06, 13:03
Well, I haven't been myself (not flippin' likely!) but I've just checked my 2000 pilot book which mentioned 75 euros, so I have no reason to doubt the price has doubled in 6 years; everything else has in Croatia (and elsewhere). Their aim is to turn Brioni into an 'in' place and clearly reckon that charging the earth is the quickest way to do that. I know there are plans to build a swanky hotel there.
If I were you, I would head for Veruda, just south of Pula: the bay of Solina is free and pretty. A popular stopover. No moorings but good holding for your anchor (there, that's us back on thread again!).

duncan
27-07-06, 10:53
[ QUOTE ]
If people experience frequent dragging with their tackle and report it on this or other forums that would be much more helpful to the consumer

[/ QUOTE ] well I am currently trying out a Sword, having replaced a Bruce with a Delta last year and the Sword this year. All anchors are exactly the same weight.

So far it hasn't dragged at all in any of the bottoms I have used it ..............

the bruce used to work well for me when set but failed to set frequently when there was weed around to get caught up on the leading edge - even light weed caused problems.

the delta set well and quickly but would ease itself through soft surfaces a little from time to time

the sword sets really hard and fast

The sword and rocna seem to me to be very similar in their fundamentals - concave blade, rocna uses tip weighting and retains a more 'classic' stock whilst the sword's curved stock applies the forces to the blades tip.

So far I don't anticipate going back to the Delta, just as I wouldn't have gone back to the bruce from the Delta either.

hylass
29-07-06, 20:27
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
so what makes the Rocna superior to the Bugel and the Sarca, which are similar type anchors?

Just curious.

[/ QUOTE ]

The fluke is concave, it has tip-weight (thicker toe than heel), the shank is better designed to fit bow rollers, it has skids to assist setting.


[/ QUOTE ]

Well, if I donīt misunderstood? this description is absolutely similar to the one of the SWORD anchor?? /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

SEE the DESCRIPTION HERE... (http://www.spade-anchor.com/Site%20anglais/US/sword.htm)

markdj
30-07-06, 22:59
We've never dragged using our Bruce but we always make sure it sets ok which it does very quickly and in snad and mud no setting is really required if there is any wind at all though we give it a tug in to be sure.

Here's experiences of a 30 ton yacht in 115 knot winds with a bruce anchor...

http://www.seakin.com/gilana/sy_for_sale/anchors.htm