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  1. #1
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    Default colregs on non tidal thames question

    I always thought that on the non tidal thames ie above Teddington that power gives way to sail

    Chatting to a pal yesterday he said that this is not the case on the non tidal thames ie sail gives way to power

    is this so ??

    if so does this also apply to robos ??

  2. #2
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    Any vessel restricted by draught and manouevrability has right of way.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    As I understand it Colregs apply on the non-tidal Thames, so under most circumstances power gives way to sail as per normal.

    Of course a large powered vessel on the river may be constrained by draught or restricted in it's ability to manoeuvre in which case sail would give way to power.

    Robos are a grey area, but strictly speaking the oars constitute mechanical propulsion so they should also give way to sail.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    "He lies the grave of Jimmy Grey
    Who insisted on his right of way!"

    On tidal or non-tidal, no matter who is right, might is always right and if it's bigger than me I park on the beach 'till its gone! Meaning I always make sure I get out of the way of river buses/trip boats who set out to bash me if they can, (it's part of their job isn't it?), and as for other mobos they probably cost more than my measly £21k tub and are equally probably less likely to withstand a bump without something expensive breaking - some one's going to have to pay for it, and if there's injury - Oh boy!!!

    If its smaller than me (skiff, punt, dinghy sailor) I still keep out of it's way if possible 'cos the bugger will almost certainly sue me citing some antique and preposterous rule I neglected to obey if his precious cockleshell touches my old tub. Go figure, these days mobo's can't win, it's like clouting taxis in London/wherever, you just know it's always going to be your fault somehow and end in tears!
    I used to think wives and boats were a financial drain on one's resources, but that was before the kids became teenagers.

  5. #5
    trev is offline
    Location : London/Home Counties/Middle East
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    The colregs apply on the 'high seas and all waters connected navigable by seagoing vessels' (bit of a misquote, but its years since I did my tickets) - so unless some local bye-law applies the rules are the same.
    On the upper Thames courtesy goes a long way.
    Trev

  6. #6
    Kilter's Avatar
    Kilter is offline Registered User
    Location : Finesse 24 Port Dinorwic
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    Here lies the body of Michael O'Day,
    who died maintaining the right of way.
    He was right, dead right, as he sailed along,
    but he's just as dead as if he'd been wrong!
    Light travels faster than sound this is why some people appear bright until you hear them

  7. #7
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question - Kilter

    Well, I was close, senility taken into account!
    I used to think wives and boats were a financial drain on one's resources, but that was before the kids became teenagers.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    Rule 18 (Responsibilities between vessels) states that the order of priority between different types of vessels goes
    1) Not Under Command
    2) Restricted in Ability to Manoeuvre
    3) Fishing
    4) Sailing


    So sailing is pretty low down on the pecking order,
    Iíve always found that when confronted with dingy sailors the best course is to stay on a predictable course at a steady speed so they can plan their next tack. Though of course to the bystander it looks like I am ploughing through the middle of erm, but I am only trying to be predictable.

    Rowers can be both 1 and 2 if they havenít got a cox and I should imagine a sculling pair facing backwards and bearing down on a dozen dinghyís all tacking back and forth could lead to a pretty dangerous situation.


    Ö.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    Not seen many fishing vessels around here!

    I approve of your method of approaching a racing fleet. A steady, predictable progression is easy for dinghy sailors to cope with.

    We do have our most exciting moments with the rowers who spend most of their time looking where they have been.

    Shouting "Have a look!" is usually effective in making them take evasive action.

    The more experienced coxless rowers generally turn and have a look ahead every four or five strokes, so they are OK.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Default Re: colregs on non tidal thames question

    I've always wondered what the best course of action is? I see many AWBs crashing down the centre of the channel - so the dinghies have to put in an extra tack.

    I scuttle along well to the right 'cos to my mind they've got to turn anyway - and if I time it right I can pass behind them without causing them any delay.

    If you can see the race well ahead sometimes a judicious slowing early enough means that they're running / reaching well away from you.

    Doesn't always work...

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