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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: MOB - self recovery

    Bonjour
    I confirm. I don't have life jacket while single handed. I'm convinced that it would only longer my agony if you are not clipped and bother me if I'm clipped.
    There is also a risk of inflating the life jacket while inside a wave or on the front deck ! On some racing boats the foredeck man has a harness without life jacket.
    The NKE autopilot that I have on Strenn have a remote control that stops the boat when the remote control is not heard by reciever. You also have a MOB button on it. I wear it round my neck all the time.
    On Sterenn I have flat straps as safety lines on deck.
    I added on each side outside everything two lifelines that hang otherboard. in case I would fall and be squeezed on the side, I could try and use these as step. Otherwise, I plan to clip the harness second strap to the external lifeline; cut of the other strap and move to the stern. The idea comes from single handed french community.
    Another important issue is to have extingible lifeline or straps. Otherwise the shock, when the safeline tightens, would kill you. The problem would be solved!
    In he Figaro race, once, a skipper fell overboard and was rescued by an other racing boat a while after. I would not trust on that chance ! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
    Tabarly nether wore a harness, took the risk and sail free for manny years but...
    Eric
    Pourquoi faire simple quand on peut faire complique ?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: MOB - self recovery

    Eric,

    Thanks for that. Would you think that climbing harnesses could be a suitable alternative, such as these :

    http://www.fieldandtrek.com/src/ukwm...UICLIMHARN.htm

    I notice that spinlock do both a full and also "climbing type" harness.

    On a similar theme, I am seriously considering buying a climbing helmet. After reading "The Ultimate Storm" on the Jester website, I think Mike Richey could well have done with one. They arent expensive and will be easy to find a home for on the boat in the box marked "HOPEFULLY NEVER TO BE OPENED".

    Merci beaucoup pour votre assistance.

    Alan
    Life is just far far too short.
    http://www.sailblogs.com/member/pipedreamii/

  3. #23
    Guest

    Default Re: MOB - self recovery

    Anyone who's tried their hand with water-skis knows how big a bow-wave the body can produce when being towed through the water. Full harnesses with tethers clipped at the navel are ideal when on-board, but will quickly drown you if you're being towed-along.

    A lot of MoB devices appear useful when discussed in a pub, but turn out to be so much rubbish in practice. The secret is to try out 'for real' under modest conditions (not just in a tranquil marina) any device you intend using. Only then will you realise that most clever ideas and marketed products are so much wishful thinking.

    Even the simple loop on a line idea - you'll soon discover that your legs will tend to 'banana' underneath the boat as you press downwards. It ain't easy ! Add to that the weight of your wet clothing ....

    Seriously suggest that you chuck yourself in, then try to re-board unaided. Even better, suggest that someone pushes you overboard when you're not expecting it - because then your entry into the water will no longer be a nicely controlled dive: if you hit the water having just exhaled your body will no longer be buoyant. At night you may sink a few feet, and without knowing which way is up, you'll have difficulty making the surface. If you're just taking a breath as you hit the water, you may inhale or swallow seawater.

    One other aspect not yet discussed is how quickly the body will lose heat in the cold waters of the North Atlantic. You will have very little time to get back on board before you will be unable to muster the strength to be able to climb aboard - even if you have some wizzo device rigged-up. The situation is even worse for the older sailor, or those that are less than fit. Immersion suits are issued to North Sea oil-rig workers for good reason.

    I'm sure RNLI crews could give some useful input on this topic ?


    Colin

  4. #24
    Superflid's Avatar
    Superflid is offline Registered User
    Location : On a sandbank......
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,561

    Default Re: MOB - self recovery

    The outcome of the search for Colros seems to have made Eric's point, although in the worst possible way.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: MOB - self recovery

    Bonjour
    I don't have a helmet on board yet, but I'll have one soon. Climbing the mast in bad weather is a shacky exercise (I never tried myself) and you bang your head. It seems that conoe helmet are the best suited. To wear the oilskin canopy under it (off course it will be raining) you need one or two size bigger.
    A climbing harness is necessary to climb the mast associated with climbing devices. (they must be kept in watter proof bags because they are not stainless steel).
    I would probably keep the sailing harness also to prevent up side down situations.
    Eric
    Pourquoi faire simple quand on peut faire complique ?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,867

    Default Re: MOB - self recovery

    I have never done the Atlantic single handed but have done a few longish hops alone - Madeira to Tangier - Falmouth to Bayonne and some in the Pacific and a few in the med .... I too never wear a life jacket but wear my safety harness day and night... My bad weather jacket has a safety harness built in.

    I did fix a trailing line to the self steering gear to 'trip' it so the boat would round up - eventually.... and I did fix a line onto the stern ladder so it could be dropped from in the water as a way of getting back on board... The only way... I never tried them in anger but the stern ladder would drop into the water if the line was pulled....

    The latest 'offshore' French regs require you to have a ladder that will drop a couple of feet under the surface... If it does not spear you first... My boat was a Moody 36 so she is a lot bigger than the Jester boats..
    Gentle Sailing Route to the Med
    http://www.michaelbriant.com

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