Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567891011 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 107
  1. #31
    jerryat is offline Registered User
    Location : Nr Plymouth
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,570

    Default Re: Sterling alt. cont. doesn\'t control float V, does Adverc or others?

    Hi Lemain,
    I'm afraid I'm not an expert in this field, but can assure you that we have motored for many, many hours (a couple of times well over over 24hrs at a time) and never had any problem with over-charging.

    I am sure that once the batteries are fully charged as sensed by the Adverc system, the voltage appears not to exceed around 13.2-13.5v, at least it that seems to be the case on my boat.

    As I use maintenance free batteries, I would have thought they'd have boiled dry years ago if there had been anything more than a float charge after so many hours of motoring at a time.

    I'm sure I remember discussing the risk of over-charging with Trevor Scarret at Adverc many years ago prior to buying an Adverc, and him assuring me the batteries could NOT be over-charged PROVIDING the wiring and ALL connections were kept in excellent condition.

    As far as we're concerned, so far he's been absolutely correct! Sorry I can't help more.

  2. #32
    pvb's Avatar
    pvb is offline Registered User
    Location : UK East Coast
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    19,664

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    Well, I reckon it's the best solution because it does allow the system to achieve a true float voltage, rather than whatever the internal regulator is set at.

    From your previous posts, I've got you down as a "belt & braces" man, so you may be interested in the latest http://www.balmar.net/Page6-6seriesalts.html high-output alternators. Although designed for external regulation, these include a back-up internal regulator and are prewired to make it easy to use the internal regulator in the event of failure of the multi-stage external regulator.

  3. #33
    Guest

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    Lemain;

    I have not read all the thread so sorry if it has been said. I have a Sterling working on the boat now but at one point it did fry my nice gel battery.

    One issue was to do with wiring of the permanent power from one bank and the sense looking at the other. In the mad situation of charging the full battery but supplying the regulator from a dead battery there were problems. I solved that by putting 2 diodes in. One diode from the switch board and one from the battery sense wire. i.e if the sensed battery is higher then it supplies the permanent power. Of course it is wired back to the selector switch with a separate wire to stop voltage drop on the sense wire.

    The other problem of the 14.0v regulator is best solved by always fitting power diodes in the charge path to the batteries. The diode should be next to the battery end of the cable. Like using half a diode splitter only. Forgetting the problems of the Sterling, this is a sensible precaution anyway. It avoids the risk of fire when the alternator diodes fail and become shorts. Generally there are never fuses in this critical lead due to the terrible effect they would have on the alternator diodes if the fuse blew.

    This also puts a ~1v drop in the output voltage. As long as the sense wire is connected beyond the diode you will never see the 1v while the Sterling is boosting the charge. The only issue is the voltage drop times amps of power that the diode needs to dissipate.

    Thanks

  4. #34
    jerryat is offline Registered User
    Location : Nr Plymouth
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,570

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    >> The beauty of the piggy-back approach (e.g. Sterling and Adverc) is that a pair of sidecutters is all you need to take it out of circuit (or, the more thoughtful installers will have put a switch in the circuit ) <<

    I understood from Adverc that their current system 'failed safe' if anything happened to their unit and the alternator reverts charging at the normal level.

    So no sidecutters needed!!!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    685

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    So what is not 'proper' about it? If it can operate as an external regulator and is multi-step

    "The Sterling Advanced Regulator converts your old fashion constant voltage alternator into a modern 4 step constant current battery charger"

    Which bit are they lying about? Or is it just that 14V is too high to float?

    I have figured out why my voltage floats at 13.5 though, even if the Sterling cant decrease the voltage. I also split the banks and added a splitter diode, which would knock about 0.7 volts off and bring down the standard 14.2V to 13.5V.

    Do you have a split charge diode Lemain? Maybe that could be your not-too-expensive answer.

  6. #36
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    No, I don't need any more alternator power. I have solar and an 80A charger from the generator so I am fine without running the engine at all. My problem is that the engine overcharges the batteries, not the other way round!

  7. #37
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    [ QUOTE ]
    Do you have a split charge diode Lemain? Maybe that could be your not-too-expensive answer.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    I suppose it is an emergency fix, you are right, but such big diodes are not cheap. 60 or so? I have no need for a splitter as I only have one battery bank, I don't have an engine start battery (my generator battery falls back as an emergency engine start if I ever needed it).

    When we are motoring I tend to have the watermaker running (20A) plus all the nav gear, fridge, etc. (say 20A) so I really would rather not have a big diode in series.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    685

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    Yes, it's a bit out of order that you need to fit a diode to get the required result from a product you bought specifically to reduce the voltage. Although the emphasis of all the Sterling and Adverc literature is on increased voltage and faster charging, they should bear in mind that batteries can boil with standard alternators/regulators and clearly state that you wont get the desired effect if you aren't splitting your banks through a diode.

    I guess the cheapest option is to just remove the original regulator and go with the 14V float, at least you'll be safe-ish then, and there are many essential things we have on board that aren't backed up.

    Hopefully Sterling and Adverc will take note... 350 customers and counting.

  9. #39
    pvb's Avatar
    pvb is offline Registered User
    Location : UK East Coast
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    19,664

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    [ QUOTE ]
    I have figured out why my voltage floats at 13.5 though, even if the Sterling cant decrease the voltage. I also split the banks and added a splitter diode, which would knock about 0.7 volts off and bring down the standard 14.2V to 13.5V.

    [/ QUOTE ]If you've wired the Sterling correctly, it will compensate for the voltage drop across the splitter diode, so you wouldn't see that 0.7V drop.

  10. #40
    pvb's Avatar
    pvb is offline Registered User
    Location : UK East Coast
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    19,664

    Default Re: Internal vs external regulation...

    [ QUOTE ]
    Yes, it's a bit out of order that you need to fit a diode to get the required result from a product you bought specifically to reduce the voltage.

    [/ QUOTE ]Diodes don't help - the Sterling & Adverc (and indeed all "smart" regulators) sense the charge voltage directly at the battery terminal, so they automatically compensate for any voltage drop across a diode.

Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567891011 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •