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Thread: Escape Plans

  1. #31
    captainslarty is offline
    Location : Currently La Coruna Spain
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    Hi all
    Re limeted budgets et al.. it all depends on WHAT you want out of your life.. I am not of fan of resaurants and bars, never have been, so only go out to them usually twice a year.. birthdays (Jayne and I)
    We fly back to the UK ONLY due to health reasons, but that is now getting sorted out.
    We eat superb food, but, we cook it ourself... we drink fine wines, but a fine wine to be can be a euro a bottle.. its what you like..
    Our total budget is just over 6K gbp.. no worries on that.. a heack of a lot of costs are down to the following...
    Lack of skills to do maintenance yourself !.
    Eating out and drinking out..
    Flights back and forth..

    Coastal hopping etc in the higher season is rather expensive, so we dont do it... from here, LC, we intend to head for the Azores, but the plan is to spend a year or two there.. evens out the expenses.
    I make odd bits of dosh - hobby only, never felt the NEED to... by selling SSB units, antennas etc, by radio electronic repairs including autopilots.
    Also computer builds and repairs, diagnostics etc..

    IF you have mechanical, electrical, plumbing, GRP / wood experience, a sewing machine etc you can live VERY cheaply.

    We have no ties in the UK, apart from Jayne's dad.. no house, nada... we have a good buffer in the bank but never need to touch it.

    Some people NEED people around them, there is mention of 'communities' in this thread, brings dread to our hearts lol... last thing I want is to be amongst a load of brits... eeek..
    The COMMUNITY is where you are.. you NEED to learn the lingo a wee bit.. you can have all the community you want then.

    The BEST time of the year for US is the winter, minimal or no liveaboards, privacy, time to do what and when you please.

    The next best time, is the early season as boats from differing nationalities pass through...

    Whatever rocks YOUR boat..

    and yes, re crusing to sort out 'issues' usually it DONT work, you have to be the right kind of person to make a success of it, there is no real stereotype though.. NORMAL people, no social hangups, acceptance of WHAT you have to work with.. OLD ideas about professions and status and keeping up wit hthe jones just does not work long term.
    There are three boats, inc us, that have wintered over.. the skills we share for no monetary reward is a pleasure to behold.. everyone can learn from the other, and make use of the skills on a purely pro-rata deal.

    The 'white collar' professions ten to be the ones with the least skills needed for crusing on a limited budget (In general, not all of course), the more practical people seem to be better equipped.
    Anyone who wants mini england etc, is advised to live in the UK... it is - again generally - not an attitude conducive with this kind of life...

    Joe

  2. #32
    Sy-Revolution's Avatar
    Sy-Revolution is offline Registered User
    Location : On board -N/B Berengaria, Cambridge
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    Definately do prettty much ALL boat maintenance myself, DO like to eat out, occationally (once a week?) Have a small boy so ice creams will be asked for whenever in 'civilisation'. We intend to anchor-for-free 90% of the time and aren't into the 'St Tropez' type of life style. Love adventure but punctuated by a little promonade from time to time.

    There's me, my partner and 6 year old lad. We'll want to travel inland a bit too, but the missus is a seasoned 'traveller' and always looks for the train with the hardest seats and the bed with the most fleas (to save costs!). Will have between 250,000 and 300,000 in the bank but would like to live as much as possible on the interest rather than chew into that sum.

    I'm no financial wiz, so will we live like paupers or princes? Or something in between?

  3. #33
    captainslarty is offline
    Location : Currently La Coruna Spain
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    Default Re: Escape Plans



    Sorry to laugh, but you will have [img]/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img] HOW MUCH ??????

    You LIVE by what you know and accept.. nothing more.. we have 40k in the bank for the rest of our lives, (I am 50, Jayne is 45).. dont need more.... and, of course, the NHS pension....

    250k would give ya about more than you would ever need..... in interest...

    Its about what YOU want out of life.. sometimes, being on a budget is far more fulfilling than money no object.. I USED to be there, so can compare....

  4. #34
    Sy-Revolution's Avatar
    Sy-Revolution is offline Registered User
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    [ QUOTE ]
    and, of course, the NHS pension....


    [/ QUOTE ]

    We don't have one of these, nor any pension actually, so the money we'll have in the bank will have to provide our entire income. glad I made you laugh though........ [img]/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img]

  5. #35
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    cool, 1/4 of a mil wil ldo nicely.
    i counted on 100k thats 10k a year for 10 years then wory about the rest, live of the kids i suppose :-)

    The Capt mentioned communities, but i believe that to be a serious problem for me and the missus. I'll go anywhere and talk to anyone, always needed to in my last job. I usually pick up work. So we got to the stage where i was working 8 hours a day, earning good money, and enjoying it. missus was on the boat for 8 hours a day, no chance of a job or even a bit of charity work, and she got blo**y lonely.
    I sometime think we may have been better on the mainland in one of the liveaboard "communities" for her. BUT have never been in one so only guessing. And it is nice to see a few brits now and again....otherwise why watch these forums?

    Regards
    Roy

  6. #36
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    On the issue of 'communities': don't worry. If you keep to the 'normal cruising routes' (follow 'World Cruising Routes' by Jimmy Cornell) you can be sure to get all the 'community' you would need if you want it. This is one of the beauties of cruising; you can get as much 'community' as you like. If you don't like it; there are lots of other routing options for you or just ignore the other cruisers around you. That is OK as well.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    We in the 'planning but gaining practical experience and practising' stage!!

    Yes, you can just take off with little or no experience and survive (Tania Aebi, Alayne Main spring immediately to mind) but having read their books, I wouldn't recommend it - they always intended to 'come home' within 2-3 years which gave them a completely different mindset to our idea of going and not coming back.

    We understand all the arguments for 'just do it' but at the same time, we are both too 'sensibly minded' to be comfortable with the thought of going without being more self-sufficient than we are at present and on having a nest egg to fall back on.

    I am learning how to service and maintain a diesel engine (may our poor Yanmar forgive me!) after having an zonking great petrol outboard on our last boat. I managed to get one small outboard going after it had been winterised (by someone else), now I need to get our dead one going so I understand the mechanics and feel confident in my ability to fix it on a shoestring in a place where spares and services aren't readily available. I am more comfortable with my woodworking skills (have just made a new cover for our engine) and rewired my first flat so am happy with electrics but am less certain of my ability to repair a sail if necessary, though in extremis, I wouldn't hesitate to have a go.

    We both need to do longer passages and more night sailing - so far our longest passages have been around 60 miles and always in daylight. Our night hours have been limited to crewing for other people and quick scoots across the Solent which we know well. I also want to learn celestial navigation and some basic astronomy (hubby already has Yachtmaster theory with celestial nav).

    From the money side, we are both relatively young (mid-30s) and have no real pensions to speak of and certainly no prospect of a nice fat index-linked company pension to retire on so we need to put enough money together to provide a suitable income from interest/dividends alone, without eating up capital. That's much easier for us than for many people as we both have good jobs and don't have kids but it will still take a few more years.

    I would recommend reading as many cruising books as possible just to get a flavour of what might be involved. My biggest fears are not storms & rough weather but pirates and serious injury at sea, hubby is more concerned with hurricane belts and not having enough books to read. You'll have to work out ways of mitigating your worries and if you're going as a couple, work out how you will deal with each other's fears, even if you think they're relatively groundless. Even the planning can be stressful if you think the other person isn't taking your concerns seriously!

    Also, you can see where you might need to improve your skill set from reading about others experiences. Frankly Tania was nuts - could barely sail, couldn't anchor, had never single-handed, couldn't even bleed her engine etc etc - but she got through (sometimes with handy injections of cash from daddy to fix things!). I wanted to slap Alayne Main within the first chapter of her book because her way of dealing with stress was to burst into tears - she had no practical skills whatsoever and if anything had happened to Alec, she probably would have perished at sea as she couldn't navigate, fix the engine, was reluctant to use the radio etc but from reading other couples cruising books, it seems fairly common for the woman to be incapable of handling the boat herself. Before we go, we will both be comfortable with handling our boat, navigating and sailing, though I am more likely to be the practical one for fixing things like engines and sails and hubby is more likely to do the technical stuff like electronics for instrumentation and power.

    Our plans have changed several times in the making and I'm sure they'll change again - we are prepared for the possibility that we will set off and may not actually like it so our plans include contingency for coming home after a year or two, rather than 10+ (if we ever come back!)

  8. #38
    ColdFusion's Avatar
    ColdFusion is offline Registered User
    Location : SSE of where I was before.
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    This is one of the most fascinating and informative threads I've read in a long time. Thank you! I've voted ('dreamer') - as my plans were temporarily curtailed two years ago when exSWMBO left after deciding that selling up to sail wasn't for her after all. I guess it's lucky I found out before the big off. Financially I'm back on track but still at least a couple more years away from being able to cast off (assuming I go on my own). I'm aiming to have at least 200k in the bank and to live off the interest only. I'm 42. I have no pension fund worth mentioning (although I should be eligible for the state pension when I reach 65+).

  9. #39
    jerryat is offline Registered User
    Location : Nr Plymouth
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    Hi Questgirl,

    You are adopting an approach that is, in my view, excellent. In particular, your learning to manage and repair the vessel's basic systems. This aspect is something that SWMBO and me discussed at length before we decided to shove off long-term cruising.

    She, like you, was adamant that in the event of anything happening to me,she should be able to bring the boat safely to a harbour. So whenevre I was repairing or servicing the engine for example, she didn't just 'pass me the 12mm spanner', but took it and had a go herself. She is excellent at electrics (did a full electrical apprenticeship before switching to management etc years ago) and, if strong enough, can carry out and UNDERSTAND virtually all of the on-board maintenance.

    That's great, but you still have to handle the boat and navigate. We do all of those things together seamlessly, as whoever is nearest the chart table for example when it's 'log time', will record the details and plot the position. Whoever is on watch will trim the sails, pull in a reef, change course or whatever. We have always done it this way. There is absolutely NO 'this or that is your job'. Oh, and by the way, WE cook and wash up!

    She took her Yachtmaster and Ham radio exams and passed, is our HF radio operator, and can handle our boat superbly, whether we're under sail or motor. As you are obviously doing, we spent loads of time, with her practising manoeuvring in confined spaces, going astern into incredibly tight gaps, learning to use propwalk etc in all sorts of wind and tide conditions.

    OK, loads of other have done exactly the same I'm sure, but we wanted to make certain that the whole experience of cruising was, as far as possible, fully enjoyed by both of us.

    She is perfectly aware when I'm scared about something, and I make no effort to conceal this. But a concern shared is definitely a concern halved because we can both (despite my far longer association with boats) equally consider the options.

    So Questgirl, you are approaching your 'dream' with a very sensible and responsible dose of reality IMHO. Yes, you may at times get bored and fed up with detail BUT, in the end, you and your other half will HUGELY benefit, as the rewards in terms of knowledge, pure relaxation, mutual enjoyment and feeling of being respected as an essential part of the team, will make it very much worthwhile.

    When you do start cruising (and perhaps even now?) you will find a huge number of 'boat wives' have little or no knowledge of their boat systems, lets alone how to handle it singe-handed. This can breed fear or trepidation, and that isn't helped by the fact that many male skippers don't know either and easily panic when something goes wrong. Then the shouting starts ............. we've all seen it. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif[/img]

    Anyway, when you do set off, have a fantastic time, you and your man will have thoroughly earned it!! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  10. #40
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Escape Plans

    Well, we all prepare as we best see fit. If I might venture an opinion though (not a criticism, an opinion) your idea of getting mechanical experience/knowledge is sound, you are realistic in your assumption that you may not enjoy the life...BUT.....don't worry over-much about your sailing experience. If you plan to go either to the Med or follow the Trade Wind route to the Caribbean and beyond, by the time you get to the Canaries (or Gib) you'll have all the experience you need to safely cross an ocean. Provided the boat is well found (I'm sure she will be) you'll learn more, faster, by actually doing it than reading about it.
    Incidentally, don't knock the value of bursting into tears. That's the female equivalent of swearing and sulking. It's what you do after a good cry that counts, crying is a great tension-releaser [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img]
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