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  1. #1
    Hurricane's Avatar
    Hurricane is offline Registered User
    Location : Sant Carles de la Ràpita
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    Default MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    Friedrichshafen is the home of MTU Engines - the second largest employer in the region. The first being ZF Gearboxes so you can see that beautiful part of Germany is a special place for marine engineering.

    So, why was I there?
    Most on this forum will already know that last year we bought a new Princess 67.
    She's fitted with twin MTU CR 2000 8V engines and at 1200 hp, I wanted to know as much as I could about these fabulous machines. Apart from a couple of minor electronic warnings, these engines have performed perfectly since we took delivery last April.
    Anyway, when I was asked if I would like to go on a service course at the factory, you can imagine that "wild horses couldn’t keep me away".

    So, while the UK was under a layer of snow, I was away in the MTU factory at Friedrichshafen.

    MTU offer these courses to owners and skippers who want to have a good understanding of the basic operation of their engines. The courses last four days and every aspect of a specific engine range is covered. As leisure boaters, our interest is in the new common rail 2000 range which like most of their models is a V format engine. This range of common rail engines goes up to about 2000 hp but the 2000 doesn’t stand for the horsepower – it’s the approximate size of each cylinder (actually about 2.2 litres each). The difference between the models in the range is the number of cylinders. For example, my engines are 1200 hp and are V8s which means that they are about 18 litres each!!

    It seems that the larger end of the marine leisure boating matket would use this CR 2000 model.

    So, here are some pics.
    First the CR 2000 – this one is the 16V version.
    My 8V engines only have 2 stage turbos whereas the 16V has 3.





    They didnt have any 8Vs in the training workshop so here's a pic of mine actually fitten in the boat.




    The courses cover interesting introductions to other ranges of MTU engines whilst focusing on the running and maintenance of your own specific machines. We also had a tour of the actual factory – sorry, I wasn’t allowed to take any photos inside, due mainly to their involvement in military designs, but I was allowed to photograph the engines in the Training Centre. I took loads of pics of the CR 2000 from various angles – might be useful later. At the end of the course, you get an MTU qualification that enables you to service your own engines.

    Here's some other models - it seems to me that mine were the smallest ones that they make!!









    And this big bugger - about 20 of these each year.





    And Gas engines for power stations





    And this one is specially designed for local railway systems - I believe that there are over 800 of these running around the UK rail network.



    And this special cut away one is great for training - actually, the product/model was designed just after the war and is still in production.



    The thing that really impressed me was the robustness of the equipment which is very apparent when you look at the service intervals. Typically, if you use the lubricants, MTU recommend oil changes only every 2 years or 500 hours. In reality, the requirement for the first service is usually after the engines initial warranty has expired. I’m quite a “hands on” person so engine servicing without invalidating the warranty was very appealing. In fact, my new qualification even covers me for resetting the valve clearances when they are due at 500 hours!!!

    Anyway enough for the moment - I have some more specific technical stuff/photos - if you are interested I'll keep the thread going.

  2. #2
    sarabande's Avatar
    sarabande is offline Registered User
    Location : up on the moors.
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    Nice kit, Hurricane. Does the team that built each unit sign it off, as with Aston Martin ?

    How much of the control system can be fixed by an owner/engineer ? Sensors, computer control stuff, I mean.

    Is there an RS232 or similar connector that will transmit all the key data up to your multi-screens ?
    I think, therefore I am. I am, therefore I sail.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    Years Ago I went to MTU in Friedrichshafen as when I worked for Condor we had a fleet initially of Hydrofoils which all had MTU engines and ZF gearboxes and we had the 16 Cylinder 396 series ( 65 litre) in a 160F hydrofoil and a waterjet catamaran, unfortunately we had crankshaft failures with this engine but probably due to the application and the long whippy drive shafts, in the first passenger only catamaran we put KHD Deutz engines which were a problem and then when we looked first at Wavepiercing car ferries we looked at the MTU 20 V 1163 series ( 232 litre each ) at about 6,500 kw (from memory) each , the boat needed four engines, in the ned we went for the Ruston Diesels which were the standard units in those boats.

    They ran an 1163 up on a test bed to show us.

    MTU is no longer partly owned by Mercedes Benz, I think it was bought out by Norwegian venture capitalists.

    An amazing company and product with fantastic engineering, with a large part of their range being military.

    Good luck with the boat and engines.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    Would agree. Sadly they were always streets ahead of the UK Paxmans which is now why most of the rail HST have been re-engined with the 4000 model. ( something like 20% less better fuel and 20% less oil) I use 2MW MTU V16s as well as Cats for my standby power needs.
    Incidentally, MTU have just opened up a rebuild factory in East Grinstead, idea being you wip the maintenance due engine out of the HST stick another one in overnight returning the train to service for the next morning rush hour and East Grinstead does the specialist work. All the rail operator has to do is keep the oil and water levels correct. I think MTU have a power by the hour type contract , I know they look at the engines by remote monitoring thus pick up faults before they cause failures in service.

    Brian

  5. #5
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    Another useless piece of information is that the Factory is there because i belive it was then called Maybach engines, produced engines for the Zeppelins as did ZF produce the gearboxes.

    Under the terms of surrender of the first world war they were banned from producing petrol engines so switched to Diesel which gave them a great lead in the second world war for the diesel engines in the submarines and the E boats and i blieve tanks but i am not sure about the last ones.

    So while the Brits and americans had MTB's with petrol engines ( Merlins) and 5000 gallons of four star ( not great when someone is shooting at you) they had steel e boats with diesel engines.

    The Germans with maybach which became MTU after a merger with other companies has been a world leader in powerfull lightweight diesel engines since the second world war.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    Engine porn!

  7. #7
    thefatlady is offline Registered User
    Location : Hampshire, UK
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    I went to MTU. My small company supplied some parts for their military engines. Nuff said.

    Not all British MTBs had Merlins. The one I was brought up on, MTB452, built by the British Power Boat Co. at Hythe, was fitted with three 1200hp Packard petrol engines.
    Don't expect mere proof to sway my opinion.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    speechless
    thanks for this unreal really...

  9. #9
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans

    Packard built Merlins under licence were they one and the same ?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: MTU Engines - Quality engineering only expected from the Germans


    Do they sell poster size prints???

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