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  1. #31
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    I am sure that SSS used to state on their web site and in their paperwork that the boats used were working boats and, as such, may not be in A1 condition visually. This was stressed as customers should not be afraid of causing the odd bump or two as this was all part of the learning process.

    Did YM Practical with 'em many years ago when John Goode was in charge (is he still?) and have to say that the whole experience was excellent.
    "ICUIDADO! LLAMA!"

  2. #32
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    Dec 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giblets View Post
    I am sure that SSS used to state on their web site and in their paperwork that the boats used were working boats and, as such, may not be in A1 condition visually. This was stressed as customers should not be afraid of causing the odd bump or two as this was all part of the learning process.

    Did YM Practical with 'em many years ago when John Goode was in charge (is he still?) and have to say that the whole experience was excellent.
    Same here! If I'd wanted a cruise on a luxury yacht I'd have picked something different!

  3. #33
    aBod is offline Registered User
    Location : Cowes and Lake District
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    Oct 2004
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    Just to say that a boat that is a bit tatty and semi falling apart isn't necessarily a good sign for a sailing school!

    I used to work as an instructor before I escaped and at most of the schools I worked at we let people try things out and were happy for them to bash the boats around as that's the only way they learn. However if it was a bad bash then we taught them how to repair the damage or got somebody in to fix it. Leaving damage (even if you don't think it's structural) or broken kit on a boat isn't great practice or very safe, it's lazy!

    SSS is obviously a very good school from what you guys have said. However it's not great to have a boat that is ruffed up and I personally wouldn't advice somebody to a place that can't be bothered to fix a boat.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by alasdair View Post
    Just to say that a boat that is a bit tatty and semi falling apart isn't necessarily a good sign for a sailing school!

    I used to work as an instructor before I escaped and at most of the schools I worked at we let people try things out and were happy for them to bash the boats around as that's the only way they learn. However if it was a bad bash then we taught them how to repair the damage or got somebody in to fix it. Leaving damage (even if you don't think it's structural) or broken kit on a boat isn't great practice or very safe, it's lazy!

    SSS is obviously a very good school from what you guys have said. However it's not great to have a boat that is ruffed up and I personally wouldn't advice somebody to a place that can't be bothered to fix a boat.
    When I did a course with SSS the boat was perfectly seaworthy and everything worked properly. The instructor was first class.
    'The lyf so short
    the arte so long to lerne.'

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by alasdair View Post
    Just to say that a boat that is a bit tatty and semi falling apart isn't necessarily a good sign for a sailing school!

    I used to work as an instructor before I escaped and at most of the schools I worked at we let people try things out and were happy for them to bash the boats around as that's the only way they learn. However if it was a bad bash then we taught them how to repair the damage or got somebody in to fix it. Leaving damage (even if you don't think it's structural) or broken kit on a boat isn't great practice or very safe, it's lazy!

    SSS is obviously a very good school from what you guys have said. However it's not great to have a boat that is ruffed up and I personally wouldn't advice somebody to a place that can't be bothered to fix a boat.

    like this ;-)


  6. #36
    Talulah's Avatar
    Talulah is offline Registered User
    Location : West London/Gosport
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    Feb 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimi View Post
    like this ;-)

    Looks like they could also have done with some training on splicing a line onto a fender.
    (Can't really talk. Mine are tied, not spliced.)

    And for anyone buying fenders, blue topped ones are a nightmare. I have numerous blue paint marks on my boat as a result of them.

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