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  1. #21
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    Apr 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerddinen View Post
    I use a hosepipe with simple nozzle fitted so I can adjust the flow of water to match the rate of use by the engine. This goes into the strainer as your initial post suggested. In this way you can start the engine before the water flow, and run the engine for as long as you wish.
    That sounds a good plan especially as my strainer and pipework between it and the seawater intake is very generously sized and hence not very bendy for inserting in buckets. BUT what sort of flowrate can I anticipate, the engine is Yanmar 2GM20F.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    One of those adjustable nozzles for the hose is useful as you can set the water flow to match the engine rpm and have a cuppa while your oil warms up.

    I also take the thermostat out before I flush through with a bucketful of antifreeze mix (Volvo 2002 raw cooled).
    It will not be difficult Mein Fuhrer! Nuclear reactors could.... heh, I'm sorry, Mr. President.

  3. #23
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    Apr 2005
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    Thanks all for your very helpful advice.

  4. #24
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    Jul 2003
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    Do as others have suggested,but make sure that your chocks are secure and do not vibdate loose. this is often over-looked.

  5. #25
    vyv_cox's Avatar
    vyv_cox is offline Registered User
    Location : North Wales, sailing Aegean Sea or Menai Strait
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    I do exactly as you suggest for a final flush with fresh water, having changed the oil when afloat. With a Vetus strainer a hosepipe with a pistol type nozzle can easily cope with the demands of a Yanmar 3GM.

    However, you need to run the engine for at least five minutes before an oil change and I suspect there may be too many opportunities for the pump to run dry if using this method. In this case I put a bucket in the cockpit, constantly topped up with a hosepipe. Then run a length of tubing from the bucket to the pump suction. Tie it to the bucket handle in case it falls out.

  6. #26
    neil_s is offline Registered User
    Location : Chichester
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    Oct 2002
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    I use a piece of hose to connect the engine cooling water intake to the galley fresh water. Start the engine, and you get three jobs done at once. Engine warm for oil change, cooling system flushed with fresh and the water tank drained!

    Neil

  7. #27
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    Jan 2005
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    As mentioned above, the water will not circulate unless you remove the thermostat from its housing.

  8. #28
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    Feb 2002
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    319

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_Robb View Post
    Many yards ban the running of engines if you are on props. You must ask the yard for permission.
    Similar with the yard I use. Is there any way round this?

  9. #29
    Twister_Ken's Avatar
    Twister_Ken is offline Registered User
    Location : 'ang on a mo, I'll just take some bearings
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    May 2001
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    Rosa,

    Try and do it in slings when the boat is lifted, before it's chocked off. A lunchtime lift facilitates this.
    Next time, it'll all be different.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicS View Post
    You have to have big bucket full of antifreeze mixture because you have to displace all the plain water in the engine and unless the engine is really HOT the thermostat will not be fully openen and most of the flow will simply go through the bypass and out with the exhaust. It will appear there long before all the plain water in the engine is displaced.

    Better perhaps to drain the engine once all the salt water is flushed out and then allow it to refill from the bucket of antifreeze.

    I suggest that a little is drained out via one of the engine drain cocks and tested for strength when you think the job is done.
    Vic
    From your reply you seem to assume that the engine is raw water cooled? I must admit I didn't get that impression.
    If the engine has a heat exchanger then the position of the engine thermostat is neither here nore there?
    The engine (fresh water system c/w anti freeze) is sealed from the raw water side. All I'm saying is that if you want to put a/f into the raw water side then once the engine is running you can add it at anytime.

    Maybe I've had a senior moment and got it wrong?

    Peter.

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