Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 160

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    timbartlett Guest

    Default Jessica Watson failed to notice ship at 1 mile

    Interesting, isn't it, that the headline given to YBWs report of the preliminary report on the PinkLady/Silver Yang collision majors on the 16 year-old skipper's failure to notice the ship at a range of 1 mile (how???).
    But the most interesting bit of the report is
    At about 0125, Silver Yang's bridge watch keeper reported observing one green light to port, on a bearing of 345(T) at a range of about 4 miles. He continued to monitor it and at 0148, he altered the ship's heading by 10 to starboard, in an attempt to avoid Ella's Pink Lady. He continued to monitor the closing situation and at 0150, applied hard-to-starboard rudder in an attempt to avoid collision.
    In other words, a supposedly professional officer saw a vessel that he should have expected to give way to, at a range of four miles. He watched it, closing on a steady bearing, for more than twenty minutes ... but still failed to give way. Then, only two minutes before the collision, he made a minimal alteration of course across the bow of the other vessel. And at half a minute before the collision, the only effect of his "hard-to-starboard" would be to swinging his stern to port -- sideswiping the yacht.

  2. #2
    Wansworth is offline Registered User
    Location : SPAIN,Galicia
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,826

    Default

    I served on a ship as relief mate where the skipper considered he did not have to give wayto yachts.God knows what he got up to on his watch!

  3. #3
    Scotty_Tradewind's Avatar
    Scotty_Tradewind is offline Registered User
    Location : Me: South Oxfordshire. Boat: Portsmouth harbour, Wicormarine
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by timbartlett View Post
    Interesting, but still failed to give way. Then, only two minutes before the collision, he made a minimal alteration of course across the bow of the other vessel. -- sideswiping the yacht.
    ...........and what was Jessica doing at this time?
    You never get to where you want to go if you only travel on sunny days.

  4. #4
    timbartlett Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty_Twister View Post
    ...........and what was Jessica doing at this time?
    The preliminary report suggests that she had looked around about 25 minutes before the collision, then went below for a cat nap.

    No-one (that I know of) has suggested that was the most brilliant bit of seamanship (or seapersonship?).

    My point is that most of the news reports have castigated the 16 year-old for her single error of not seeing the ship, which endangered no-one but herself. Very few have criticised the professional for what sounds like a whole succession of errors that endangered someone else.

  5. #5
    Ubergeekian's Avatar
    Ubergeekian is offline Registered User
    Location : Me: Castle Douglas, SW Scotland. Boats: Kirkcudbright, Loch Ken, Port Bannatyne
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    9,906

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by timbartlett View Post
    My point is that most of the news reports have castigated the 16 year-old for her single error of not seeing the ship...
    That was one error. Going to sleep in a shipping lane was another error. Planning a trip to include going to sleep in a shipping lane was yet another, and probably the most worrying, error.

  6. #6
    Woodlouse's Avatar
    Woodlouse is offline Registered User
    Location : Behind your curtains.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    6,074

    Default

    Have to say that this report is very different to the account we first heard.

    In defense of the chap on watch, he only saw a green light when the boat was four miles away. If I recall my colregs correctly then the lights on Pink Lady would only have had to be visible at a range of three miles so spotting the vessel earlier may not have been possible. We all know how badly yachts can show up on radar screens, even with reflectors.

    Now I'm not saying the watch officer was correct in his actions, but how many of you can see a single green light and instantly know whether avoiding action is necessary? It might not be immediately apparent that the range is closing as a steady bearing can also mean a parallel course.

    Seems that with the current evidence both vessels are at fault. The cargo ship for failing to give way early enough, and the yacht for not maintaining a proper lookout and failing to take avoiding action once the giveway vessel failed to take sufficient avoiding action its self.

    Now the part I cannot comprehend is how Jessica Watson failed to spot a cargo ship at a range of 1 mile when she was monitoring the radar for a reported one minute to ascertain the course of a ship 6 miles away. My experience of small boat radars tells me that a cargo ship one mile away will be such a large contact on the radar that it will almost form a ring around the range line. It will certainly be a big enough blob on the screen to be completely unmissable.

    So, is Miss Watson telling the truth yet?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    2,299

    Default

    Where is this report? It doesn't appear on MAIB

  8. #8
    Woodlouse's Avatar
    Woodlouse is offline Registered User
    Location : Behind your curtains.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    6,074

    Default

    It's a preliminary report that YBW have published as news on their home page. The final report won't be out for some time, but we won't let that stop us from jumping to conclusions.

  9. #9
    timbartlett Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Observer View Post
    Where is this report? It doesn't appear on MAIB
    And probably never will! It's a preliminary report by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, and published on their own website on
    http://www.atsb.gov.au/media/739587/...008_prelim.pdf

    (Insert "mo2009" in place of the string of dots in that url!)

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodlouse View Post
    The final report won't be out for some time, but we won't let that stop us from jumping to conclusions...
    such as...
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodlouse View Post
    is Miss Watson telling the truth yet?
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodlouse View Post
    how many of you can see a single green light and instantly know whether avoiding action is necessary? It might not be immediately apparent that the range is closing as a steady bearing can also mean a parallel course.
    A single green light immediately tells me that it's an unpowered vessel ... and if it isn't a tow (unlikely, without seeing some sign of the tug) it's most likely a sailing vessel.And if it wasn't in sight before, and it is now, then it's probably getting closer. And he didn't have to make an "instant" decision: he waited nearly twenty five minutes before doing anything!

  10. #10
    Woodlouse's Avatar
    Woodlouse is offline Registered User
    Location : Behind your curtains.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    6,074

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by timbartlett View Post

    A single green light immediately tells me that it's an unpowered vessel ... and if it isn't a tow (unlikely, without seeing some sign of the tug) it's most likely a sailing vessel.And if it wasn't in sight before, and it is now, then it's probably getting closer. And he didn't have to make an "instant" decision: he waited nearly twenty five minutes before doing anything!
    Just because you've only just seen the light doesn't necessarily mean it wasn't there before though. Once you've seen it however you'd need to monitor it before deciding on a course of avoiding action if necessary otherwise the seas would be a very dangerous place with vessels making wild course alterations every time they saw a light.

    I'm not saying the chap on watch was correct in his actions, I'm simply trying to explain how events could have played out to end as they did. He misjudged the situation. Even so, it would seem he acted far more professionally afterwards by stopping the engines and making sure that the girl didn't want any assistance before moving on. Which is more than can be said for the bridge watch of the Pride of Bilbao when they ran down the Ouzo.


    My comment on whether the girl is telling the truth or not is simply because I cannot imagine how one can see a ship 6 miles off on radar and miss a ship that is only 1 mile away.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •