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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by parsifal View Post
    As for sleeping quietly when the wind gets up - I'm one of those old-fashioned fusspots who gets up and checks that I'm anchored safely or even, dare I say it, keeps an anchor watch!
    You sit up checking bearings, I'll sleep soundly in the knowledge that my GPS or depth gauge will wake me if we start to drag.
    One hull good, two hulls better.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowleopard View Post
    You sit up checking bearings, I'll sleep soundly in the knowledge that my GPS or depth gauge will wake me if we start to drag.
    I sleep soundly with absolute faith in my CQR. Seems that going by this thread I do everything wrong, I use a CQR, I let it free fall then I run out as much chain as I want before usually using the engine to really dig it in. All wrong apparently, but It's never dragged.

  3. #33
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    All magazine reviews are pants, they get a yacht or product for a day, try it once and then give it marks out of 10 or whatever.

    These forums provide a much better source of information.
    It will not be difficult Mein Fuhrer! Nuclear reactors could.... heh, I'm sorry, Mr. President.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by vyv_cox View Post
    Exactly so. The best attribute that the 'modern' anchor designs have given us is the increased range of bottoms that they can cope with. After 20 years as a satisfied user of a Delta I suffered drag in a very soft mud bottom, admittedly in the wildest conditions I have ever experienced. I also had a few more problems than I wanted when anchoring stern-to, mostly in the fresh cross-winds that are a feature of many Greek harbours. I bought a Rocna that has so far not been tested in the conditions that led to the dragging of the Delta but is undoubtedly better in stern-to berthing.
    Thats interesting. I have just changed from a CQR copy to a Delta because the former was very poor when there was weed or a hard bottom. Never had any problem with stern to anchoring - indeed, my wife who hates all this palaver was always proud of being able to set the CQR. After a bit of experimentation we think we have sussed that you have to let the Delta set first rather than dropping on the run as we did with the CQR - not always convenient.

    Have a CQR on my boat in Poole - been there since 1963. Great in the harbour mud and not too bad in sand, but hopeless if you go seahorse bashing in Studland now the bottom is infested with eel grass!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodlouse View Post
    I sleep soundly with absolute faith in my CQR. Seems that going by this thread I do everything wrong, I use a CQR, I let it free fall then I run out as much chain as I want before usually using the engine to really dig it in. All wrong apparently, but It's never dragged.
    Yep, me too, I generally use a CQR though also like the Delta, I let 3 x times scope freefall as I'm going astern, set the anchor, let an additional whatever amount out according to various factors. I've never had a pile up of chain and I'm surprised I've survived for as long as I have without a single hiccup - there must be a Guardian Angel looking out for me. As for the debate on using the engine, what's to debate? I know I could set the anchor under sail but since my boats fitted with an engine why not blooming use it to make absolutely sure the anchors well set, in fact I'd consider it negligent not to do so.

    Cheers, Brian.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by parsifal View Post
    You mean do as I have been doing for the last 39 years!

    I was not seeking advice but trying to tactfully point out that people have managed to sail boats, and anchor them, quite competently without engines for thousands of years. In fact they still do in many parts of the world.

    My first yacht had no engine, and my second had a tiny outboard which spent most of its life corroding quietly in a locker and was not certainly not used for any manouvres involving an anchor.

    Personally if I arrive at some anchorage under sail I am not going to start the engine just to dig in the anchor, which will dig itself in when a load comes on it. If it doesn't then I'll do something about it. As for sleeping quietly when the wind gets up - I'm one of those old-fashioned fusspots who gets up and checks that I'm anchored safely or even, dare I say it, keeps an anchor watch!
    In which case I apologise most profusely - I share similar experiences with a "Stuart NONE Turner" in the first yacht I sailed.

    I was simply trying to nudge the 'motor boats with sails' brigade that seems to make up the vast majority of "sailing" boat owners to try using sails for all manouvers (as you may well have been). If the wind is suitable I am not adverse to sailing out or in to my marina berth. (And once was applauded by surprised visitors just for sailing around the end of the breakwater). I once had a YM instructor criticise me for anchoring on a run in light airs. Presumably, he was another 'mobo with sails' type at heart and unable to accept that its possible to put the helm over just before checking the chain to avoid it touching the hull.

    I was anchored in the mouth of the Helford River for a day on May bank holiday. It was interesting to see that the most of the boats that worked up the river under sail (rather than motor sail) were gaff rigged, plus a modified Freedom 35 with a junk rig. Three of the gaffers tacking up the river were a lot bigger and heavier than most of the 'mobos with sails' that chugged past.

    Now that GPS has taken all the fun out of navigation I find the most satisfying aspect of owning a boat is handling under sail - with the occasional use of a sweep or a warp to avoid shattering the peace of a still evening.
    Last edited by srm; 02-11-09 at 20:36. Reason: addition

  7. #37
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    i've spent weeks n weeks out at studland using a cqr without a problem sat through gales etc quite happlily, never had a problem with it setting.
    I did rescue a malo 38 that was off on a jolly without its owners, when they got back and recovered their bruce anchor it had a rock nealy fitted in side of it, so maybe there are some anchors (bruce) which would be better if they were truely buried rather than just left to set on their own ?
    No one home...............Gone sailing !
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by ribrage View Post
    . . .38 that was off on a jolly without its owners, when they got back and recovered their bruce anchor it had a rock nealy fitted in side of it, so maybe there are some anchors (bruce) which would be better if they were truely buried rather than just left to set on their own ?
    Had a similar experience with a big Bruce on an MFV. We motored astern to check the anchor was holding, which it was. When it was recovered there was a big slab of rock like a tomb stone wedged by a smaller rock in its jaws. It took a bit of judicious boot work by a crew member standing on the stem head to get it to drop its prize.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyingscampi View Post
    All magazine reviews are pants, they get a yacht or product for a day, try it once and then give it marks out of 10 or whatever.

    These forums provide a much better source of information.
    My feeling is that you get way too much of 'my anchor is best' and very little informed comparison around here. The most valuable posts are those that give experiences of more than one type
    One hull good, two hulls better.

  10. #40
    rudolph_hart is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowleopard View Post
    My feeling is that you get way too much of 'my anchor is best' and very little informed comparison around here. The most valuable posts are those that give experiences of more than one type
    I've used a few types, with various combinations of chain & warp, but the one that truly gasted my flabber with its holding power was an aluminium Fortress on my previous Dehler 34. This anchor was so light it could be waved around overhead with one hand, yet held in soft mud through a 20-minute "mini tornado" (as dubbed by the media when reporting the structural damage it caused in nearby Brightlingsea).

    For the current owner, it also held in hard sand off a lee-shore Chichester Bar in a bit of a blow, when the Whitlock steering jammed on full lock. It was so well dug in they couldn't raise it, so they buoyed it & retrieved it after the blow. It was bent but intact.

    Current anchor is a 15kg Delta (factory fitted).

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