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  1. #1
    benlui is offline Registered User
    Location : Cork Ireland, Cyclades, Greece
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    421

    Default replace seacocks?

    Based in Cork ireland, does anyone know anyone that would come and replace the seacocks on my boat at a reasonable cost? its not a job ide be conpitent enough to carry out i think. Want them changed for trip abroad this season so there is no doubts. Any advise appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    19,115

    Default

    Firstly why do you want to replace them?. If there is no corrosion and they work without leaking they should not need replacing.

    Secondly, what type are they? If they are the "traditional" Blakes cone type they can be serviced by dismantling. If they are ball valves they are relatively easy to replace - just unscrew and screw on a new one. However that is only necessary if they are seized and cant be freed up by cleaning debris on the outside and operating them a few times.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    2,290

    Default

    As Tranona says, you don't need to replace them unless there's a problem. The handle is usually the first bit to go, if the whole ball valve is not seized.

    Replacing the seacock is just basic plumbing. Often the biggest problem is access.

    Make sure you get a replacement ball valve made of suitable material. Lots of previous threads on the subject, and I mean lots! Get some PTFE tape and wrap it around the thread when fitting the new one. If when tightened the handle isn't where you want it to be, unscrew it and put on some more PTFE tape.

    Check the skin fitting etc when you're replacing the seacock. If it has turned a reddish colour it has probably de-zincified and will be brittle. Otherwise should be fine just to fit the new seacock.

  4. #4
    VicS is offline Registered User
    Location : Home: Kent. Boat: Chichester
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    Jul 2002
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    31,255

    Default

    If when tightened the handle isn't where you want it to be, unscrew it and put on some more PTFE tape.
    It would be better to use a back nut to lock the valve firmly in the position required.

    PTFE tape is for sealing joints, tapered ones at that, not for adjusting the extent the valve is screwed onto the skin fitting.

    One way is a bodge, the other a proper engineering solution

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    2,290

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VicS View Post
    It would be better to use a back nut to lock the valve firmly in the position required.
    Seems reasonable.

    However my understanding was that the use of the PTFE tape method was pretty common amongst professional plumbers. In fact, just out of curiosity I've had a poke around in the airing cupboard here and the plumber that did this place used PTFE tape. I understand that the old fashioned method was to use cord - not sure the proper name plumbers use for it.

    So if it is a bodge it one the professionals use, not just DIY-ers.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    57,234

    Default the old fashioned method was to use cord - not sure the proper name plumbers use for

    Hemp & Paste
    I may be wrong but not always

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