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  1. #1
    sjclewes's Avatar
    sjclewes is offline Registered User
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    Default anchor chain how much does she hold?

    hi all Iíve nearly finished refitting my southerly 105 the anchor and chain that came with her is a Bruce anchor and 30 metres of 10mm. a good friend of mine recommends 60 metres but will that much chain fit in a southerly chain locker? if so will it need to be stainless ive watched him struggle with his 30mtrs and 20 mtrs of anchor plate wich kept pyramiding and jamming also whatís the forums thoughts on a good anchor for Milford haven area.

  2. #2
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    I don't think your ground tackle should be selected on the basis of the capacity of your anchor locker.
    You'll need to make a few decisions: With all chain you can anchor with a scope of 4:1, perhaps 3:1 with your rather heavy chain, in normal conditions. You should have enough additional chain to enable you to go to 5:1 or even a bit more as the wind picks up. In any case you should have a minimum of 25m deployed.
    The depth at HW in the area you plan to anchor, plus the height from bow roller to water surface, times 5 is your minimum chain requirement.
    You could choose to use a chain/rope mix, with say 20m of chain to which is attached a length of nylon rode. In that case you need to think in terms of 7:1 scope.
    You may want to consider carrying two rodes, so you can set two anchors if conditions dictate. Most boats, in any case, carry two anchors - usually of two different types to suit different bottom conditions.
    Ask the locals what types of anchor they use in the area you sail. Anchor weight is usually recommended by the anchor manufacturer for your size of boat - but be suspicious if the recommended weight equates to less than about 1lb per foot of boat length.
    When you've decided on the most suitable ground tackle for your sailing ground and conditions you then have to work out how to stow it. If your anchor locker is too small, the answer isn't to carry less ground tackle!
    There is an article on the Salty John website that will give you the basics.
    Anchoring is an emotive subject around here for some reason; try to keep your objectivity when the opinions start flying!

  3. #3
    sjclewes's Avatar
    sjclewes is offline Registered User
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    Default

    thanks for the reply the boat came fitted with a Bruce 10 kilo and 30 mtrs of chain 20 mtrs of 16mm rope my friend who keeps his boat in the same area has the same but often has to put it all out he recommends 60 mtrs my thought are 50/60 mtrs of 10 mm stainless obviously stainless stack better whatís your thoughts?

  4. #4
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    10mm chain is overkill. 8mm and 12 or 14mm rope is recommended size. 10kg Bruce is right size. Would not go the 10mm stainless route - too heavy, hugely expensive and not necessary.

    Would be tempted to try what you have, with the ability to attach further warp if you find you want extra scope. You don't say if you have a windlass, but if you are replacing then better to spend the money on a windlass, 40 metres of 8mm and 30m of 14mm spliced on to the chain. Similarly see how you get on with the Bruce before spending more money.

  5. #5
    KenMcCulloch is offline Registered User
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    Is there evidence that SS chain is less inclined to pile up than galvanised? I'm not convinced. With regard to size of chain I would have thought 8mm would be adequate for a boat of your size. If you go for oversized chain you will be more restricted in the length/weight of your cable. Vyv Cox is the man for really expert advice about chain though.
    Ken McCulloch
    Rival 38 'Cherry Ripe'

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    I feel the 10kg Bruce is too small for your boat, you may consider one of the newer designs of anchor at around 15kg, some of them are silly prices, I would go for a Delta and keep the Bruce as a back up.
    You could then get yourself more rope (20m is not enough), say 50m and keep the chain as it is.
    A season on the boat will tell you if you can handle the extra chain. All chain is great tilll you have to get in aboard from deep water, but I guess you have a power windlass.

  7. #7
    sjclewes's Avatar
    sjclewes is offline Registered User
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    Default

    hi the boat came with a manual windlass i was thinking of going for a kabra 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by KenMcCulloch View Post
    Is there evidence that SS chain is less inclined to pile up than galvanised? I'm not convinced.....
    Yes stainless steel has a lower coefficient of friction than Galvanised surfaces and will therefore be less likely to form into a pyramid which might be useful in shallow lockers. I noticed on one yacht that they had a cone directly below the hawse pipe exit into chain locker.

    Next time you visit the chandlers experiment with chain and you will see that the stainless easily falls off from the pile up.

    I am not so sure that it is that black and white. On my own boat I notice that I get pile ups when the chain has a twist in it. Another reason for swivels perhaps; I don't use them?

  9. #9
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    If your chain really is 10mm it's unnecessarily heavy - but you already have it so might as well keep it. I'd add a longer rope section, though, perhaps 50m.
    If you buy a new all chain rode 8mm is more than adequate. You could even go for 6mm Hi Test which is more flexible and easier to handle. That's my choice, but maybe controversial.
    Dont use stainless chain - hot dip galvanized, short link, calibrated is what you need.
    A 10kg Bruce is too light. I'd choose a different anchor and use the Bruce as a kedge or supplementary anchor for when you want to put two out - or sell it.

  10. #10
    macd is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjclewes View Post
    the boat came with a manual windlass i was thinking of going for a kabra 2
    If you mean a Lofrans Kobra (don't know what the '2' would be), I fitted a 1000W version three years ago and am very happy with it. Fitting an electric windlass isn't particularly technical, but is a much bigger job than you might imagine. Half the work is running cables, especially on an older design of boat which probably doesn't have adequate built-in trunking.

    As the man said, Vyv Cox is the expert on all things metallic, but I can see no compelling reason for preferring stainless chain. However, if you go for galvanised, beware that much of it on the market has poor galvanising. This includes the chain Lofrans themselves supply. Mine's on its last legs after the same three years. Insist on UK- or European-made chain if you can. I've no personal experience of it, but have read that Jimmy Green's chain is good.

    Please only get into a debate on the merits of various anchors if you don't plan on doing much sailing this year...you'll be too busy reading posts. A very contentious topic!

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