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Thread: Spinning Delta!

  1. #11
    vyv_cox's Avatar
    vyv_cox is offline Registered User
    Location : North Wales, sailing Aegean Sea or Menai Strait
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    The inversion on recovery is another example of life biting you in the bum! It very often happens with us but with a swivel it's an easy matter to rotate the anchor before the final hoist aboard. A more sophisticated solution is one of the cranked swivels that are designed to overcome this. It's a rather expensive way to solve a small problem, though.
    Answers to some technical queries at http://coxengineering.sharepoint.com

  2. #12
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    So you seem to be talking about two separate issues, how your anchor behaves on the seabed is not related to how it comes back to the roller.

    On the roller issue and the anchor orientation, this is not uncommon as your boat is unlikely to be completely dead in the water and your swivel will allow the anchor to position itself according to hydrodynamics and even wind above the water if there's enough of it. Your swivel however should allow the anchor to rotate properly once the shank climbs onto the roller. Don't pull it in too fast at this stage, stop the windlass as soon as the shank is on the roller, wait for it to sort itself out, then continue. If it behaves badly in this regard, jamming or jumping off the roller, it is really a fault with the roller design. The only other solution is to remove the swivel and ensure the chain is always the correct orientation and doesn't twist on the roller.

    From what you've said I don't think there's anything conclusive to say about the setting failures. The Delta should* achieve the correct setting position regardless of how it's dropped, you don't need to 'baby' any anchor in this sense so long as you don't dump chain on top of it. As above its setting behavior has nothing to do with what orientation the anchor returns to the boat at. The Delta doesn't handle 'extreme' seabeds well, i.e. very hard substrate or weed/grass. Otherwise all the normal questions apply, exact bottom types, scope #s, etc.

    * Deltas can in soft seabeds lie on their backs and fail to achieve the correct setting position. In this case the shank digs into the mud and acts a bit like a keel, while the convex fluke and the "wings" on the back of the heel stabilize it in that upside-down position when dragged. However, I would not call this normal behavior, as it will only develop in a certain set of circumstances, and feedback complaining of it is rare. In harder seabeds I would say it's unlikely/impossible. An academic possibility however.

    In the unlikely case that the anchor is really not setting properly as it should, I would say most likely it is damaged or a lemon. Check the steel plate of the shank is dead straight with no 'bow' or warp/twist in it. Then check the shank is welded dead center on the fluke. Then check that the heel is evenly welded to the cast tip, and that both sides of the heel are symmetrical and even with the axis of the anchor. Use a rule where you can, visual sights may not be accurate enough, even small innaccuracies can cause problems.

  3. #13
    Sy-Revolution's Avatar
    Sy-Revolution is offline Registered User
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    We drop our delta by disengaging the gypsy and dropping fast. We're in the med and can see it as it goes down. It tends to 'fly' out away from the bow and always sets correctly. Ours is a 20kg Simpson Lawrence.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigsmith View Post
    As truthful as an honest politician as usual
    Thanks for the unbiased info,I must be very lucky that my Delta works at all(quote James May)
    "It was the crew's fault"

  5. #15
    omega2's Avatar
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    Location : Essex Bradwell UK
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    We have a Delta, it sets almost every time, except sometimes on hard ground. It recovers 9 out of ten times the right way up. I have a Simpson Lawrence 17gk, at present deployed and another in the garage, plus another one with just Delta on the sticker, both were "bargain" basement so I had them. A friend of mine got a "copy" for about 30, it was useless. The only difference we could detect was the slightly rougher finish to the casting, but there is something else missing. Unless Hardy marked yours how can they be sure it's a proper one? just been out there the other one is labeled Lewmar, both are about 160 todays prices.
    Last edited by omega2; 10-06-10 at 11:42.

  6. #16
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    Default Thanks for the ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by craigsmith View Post
    So you seem to be talking about two separate issues, how your anchor behaves on the seabed is not related to how it comes back to the roller.

    On the roller issue and the anchor orientation, this is not uncommon as your boat is unlikely to be completely dead in the water and your swivel will allow the anchor to position itself according to hydrodynamics and even wind above the water if there's enough of it. Your swivel however should allow the anchor to rotate properly once the shank climbs onto the roller. Don't pull it in too fast at this stage, stop the windlass as soon as the shank is on the roller, wait for it to sort itself out, then continue. If it behaves badly in this regard, jamming or jumping off the roller, it is really a fault with the roller design. The only other solution is to remove the swivel and ensure the chain is always the correct orientation and doesn't twist on the roller.

    From what you've said I don't think there's anything conclusive to say about the setting failures. The Delta should* achieve the correct setting position regardless of how it's dropped, you don't need to 'baby' any anchor in this sense so long as you don't dump chain on top of it. As above its setting behavior has nothing to do with what orientation the anchor returns to the boat at. The Delta doesn't handle 'extreme' seabeds well, i.e. very hard substrate or weed/grass. Otherwise all the normal questions apply, exact bottom types, scope #s, etc.

    * Deltas can in soft seabeds lie on their backs and fail to achieve the correct setting position. In this case the shank digs into the mud and acts a bit like a keel, while the convex fluke and the "wings" on the back of the heel stabilize it in that upside-down position when dragged. However, I would not call this normal behavior, as it will only develop in a certain set of circumstances, and feedback complaining of it is rare. In harder seabeds I would say it's unlikely/impossible. An academic possibility however.

    In the unlikely case that the anchor is really not setting properly as it should, I would say most likely it is damaged or a lemon. Check the steel plate of the shank is dead straight with no 'bow' or warp/twist in it. Then check the shank is welded dead center on the fluke. Then check that the heel is evenly welded to the cast tip, and that both sides of the heel are symmetrical and even with the axis of the anchor. Use a rule where you can, visual sights may not be accurate enough, even small innaccuracies can cause problems.

    All good stuff Craig - thanks. I will take a good close look at it. Everyone else seems to do fine so it's either me or the anchor and (of course) I'm perfect!
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