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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Lakes
    Posts
    347

    Default Maurice Griffith Riptide 31,I phones and Kirkudbright

    This may seem a strange title and contrasting one normally wooden boats and modern stuff like I phones dont go together .However last week I took my Riptide, which I recently aquired, from Cumbria over to Kirkcudbright.It was a part night passage leaving Cumbria about 8.30 pm and aiming to anchor at Ross Island after midnight to wait for the tide to go up the Dee Estuary and river.
    Well I have never sailed in the Solway before and havent worked out how to use the ancient black and white chart plotter on board yet.
    This night passage seemed a little daunting for a first trip, I have the navionics app on my phone and though well I will try that.
    Using that we soon picked up the lights on Ross Island ,but then decided to go round the back to anchor and wait for tide to turn.

    We anchored in Ross sound at low water ,it was easy to see exactly where we were on the Navionics screen ,and it was handy being able to stand at the wheel and see exactly where you were without rushing off down below.I could check the depth which at times was less than a metre .
    Anyway after a couple of hours by touching the tide symbol on the App a very helpful tidal curve popped up telling me I had just enough water to go through the sound as it was neaps.
    So off we went, slowly, as often there was less than 1.5m below and picked up the transit from the 2 light houses on Ross Island and headed for the channel up the river in the distance. The transit from the light houses is very helpful as one light is exactly above the other if you are on the right bearing.
    With some nervousness we headed up the Dee and after about 4 miles picked up red and green bouys in the channel.They arent that close together at times, and you have to be careful in the dark ,but the Iphone was accurate enough for me to see my boat icon passing the buoys and the whole trip was a bit like a real life computer game as I watched the screen and my friend managed the wheel responding to my directions.

    Anyway soon we arrived at Kirkudbright ,what a nice place ,even at 3am !
    The next morning we met the harbour master Rab,a real gentleman, who had booked us in and given me the beta that I would get up the channel at low water with my 4 ft draught and neap tides.He declined to charge us for the night as we arrived so late.
    Next day we had a look around the town and liked it so much we stayed another night,there was no wind for sailing back anyway,but more forecast for the next day.We headed back across a very misty Solway ,picking our way past the massive Robin Rigg windfarm.It was quite poor visibility at sea and more and more windmills kept materialising out the mist every 5 minutes ,like an army of giants guarding the passage to England from Scotland. However there was a good breeze,we whisked by them without a challenge,and it was nice to sail back to Workington.
    Anyway the boat did well and I can recommend quaint plywood boats as everybody who passes stops to find out about her, especially people older than me who can remember Eventides,Waterwitches etc.
    The past and the future blended well across the Solway under the watchfull spirit of Maurice Griffiths.
    Last edited by Clarky; 16-06-10 at 14:02. Reason: grammar

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Me: Castle Douglas, SW Scotland. Boats: Kirkcudbright, Loch Ken, Port Bannatyne
    Posts
    9,906

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Clarky View Post
    With some nervousness we headed up the Dee and after about 4 miles picked up red and green bouys in the channel.They arent that close together at times, and you have to be careful in the dark ,but the Iphone was accurate enough for me to see my boat icon passing the buoys and the whole trip was a bit like a real life computer game as I watched the screen and my friend managed the wheel responding to my directions.
    Sorry I missed you. Come back and see us again sometime. Good summer Saturday barbecues as the sailing club!

    You have to be a wee bit careful following the buoys, as there has been a pretty major channel shift just where the river widens out - north end of Doon beach - of late. The starboard hand buoys are now roughly mid-channel while the port hand ones are anything up to 20m away from the water and 2m above it at low tide. I spent a cheerful couple of hours aground in mid-channel (as buoyed) a couple of weeks ago ...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Lakes
    Posts
    347

    Default

    Thanks for that ,we did get that info from Rab, as left at more or less low water.
    We will certainly be back ,lovely town and excellent pontoons so no drying out.

    Cheers,
    Clarky

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    51

    Default

    I spent a winter working in KBT a few years ago. Its a lovely place. We used to travel off to the barge by RIB. The pontoons are great but I have to agree about the distance between the channel buoys and coming in in the dark on a falling tide was exciting.

  5. #5
    photodog is offline Lord High Commander of Upper Broughton and Gunthorpe
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    31,852

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    Thats a lovely looking boat you have their Clarky.

    When I were a wee nipper I was sent to live with my granfather in Kirkudbright... and schooled at the Academy.

    Egg cobs from the cafe in St Cuthberts Street... (Right next to St Marys..) now gone.

    Quite a few fishing boats back then as well...

    It's become quite the arty place nowaday... last time I was there was for my grandfathers funeral.

    Whenever we went up and visited him before he passed, we used to stay at the Selkirk.

    Really happy memories. Riding my bike down to my mate in Borgue... and spending the day Mucking about in Ross bay and on the beach...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Me: Castle Douglas, SW Scotland. Boats: Kirkcudbright, Loch Ken, Port Bannatyne
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    9,906

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    Quote Originally Posted by photodog View Post
    Quite a few fishing boats back then as well...

    It's become quite the arty place nowaday... last time I was there was for my grandfathers funeral.
    There still is a large fishing fleet here - I believe that most pf the scallops landed in Britain come into Kirkcudbright now. The Solway Harvester was a Kirkcudbright boat, although the crew (almost?) all came from Isle of Whithorn.

    The artistic side has been around for well over a hundred years. I'm still kicking myself that I didn't buy Greengates, Jessie M. King's house - it came on the market just after I'd bought my place for roughly the same.

    Downsides are that the population is overwhelmingly retired and the town is run for their benefit. The swimming pool is mostly an OAP's float-n-chat club and young people are generally treated pretty badly, leaving as soon as they can. Think a Scottish version of Frinton-on-Sea.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    51

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    As an outsider it appeared all there was in the town to look forward to when you left school was the scallops or the creamery.
    We stayed in the Gordon House which was great, I did spend a few nights in the Royal which was dismal.
    There was also a few very drunken nights in Castle Douglas.

    I worked on Robin Rigg and could just make out the lighthouse on Ross Island in the distance.

    Great memories.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Me: Castle Douglas, SW Scotland. Boats: Kirkcudbright, Loch Ken, Port Bannatyne
    Posts
    9,906

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    Quote Originally Posted by mylo View Post
    As an outsider it appeared all there was in the town to look forward to when you left school was the scallops or the creamery.
    The creamery has just closed. Wiping geriatric bottoms is about as exciting as it gets there now, and this prospect does not entice many school leavers.

    We stayed in the Gordon House which was great, I did spend a few nights in the Royal which was dismal.
    There was also a few very drunken nights in Castle Douglas.
    Before moving down permanently - while house hunting - we used to stay in the wonderfully eccentric "Toad Hall" B&B on Castle St. The Selkirk Arms was always excellent for food, changed owners and went downhill, changed again and is reputed to have improved.

    The pages of the "Galloway News" are always stuffed with the aftermath of drunken nights in Castle Douglas. between them the Market Inn and the Douglas Arms seem to generate at least half a dozen sheriff court appearances per week. My local town, though, and a heck of a lot livelier than Kirkcudbright.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Lakes
    Posts
    347

    Default

    [QUOTE=photodog;2545322]Thats a lovely looking boat you have their Clarky.

    Thanks for that . Photodog.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    5,741

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    Quote Originally Posted by photodog View Post

    It's become quite the arty place nowaday... last time I was there was for my grandfathers funeral.
    The arty bit is not new - read Dorothy Sayers' "Five Red Herrings", which is a murder mystery set in the artistic community of Dumfries and Galloway during (approximately) the 1920s. Sayers was very good at getting local colour correct.

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