Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,709

    Default squealing Halyard shaft seal

    Hi
    My recently acquired boat has a Halyard shaft seal (age unknown); on engaging gear it occasionally squeals for a minute or two before quietning down to zero noise. The oil level is fine but I do not know the grade of oil and there seems to be no leakage. Is the squeal a common feature? is there a fix? or Is the seal telling me that it is on its last legs ?

  2. #2
    Pye_End's Avatar
    Pye_End is offline Registered User
    Location : N Kent Coast
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,519

    Default

    Are you sure that it is the seal itself and not the cutless?

  3. #3
    charles_reed's Avatar
    charles_reed is offline Registered User
    Location : Home Shropshire 6/12; boat Greece 6/12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    9,288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Moonfire View Post
    Hi
    My recently acquired boat has a Halyard shaft seal (age unknown); on engaging gear it occasionally squeals for a minute or two before quietning down to zero noise. The oil level is fine but I do not know the grade of oil and there seems to be no leakage. Is the squeal a common feature? is there a fix? or Is the seal telling me that it is on its last legs ?
    Seal infrequently squeals, when oil seals are about to go. Water seals last for (nearly) ever.

    I would plan the replacement of the Halyard in toto, now - as it was gravely disappointing in service and the manufacturers discontinued support about 12 years ago.

    I replaced mine with a PSS, in 1998, which has given about 5700 hours use - occasional movement of the rotor down the shaft, resulting in leaks, to which I fitted a new bellows (unneccesarily it turned out), last summer.

  4. #4
    Andrew_Fanner is offline Registered User
    Location : ked into poverty by children
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    8,517

    Default

    I, on the advice of the boatyard, replaced the oil in the seal with grease suitable for a stern gland with fitted greaser. The oil line from the reservoir was connected to a greaser and the whole thing filled with grease. No subsequent issues. The seals had been perfect but careless removal of the shaft, by another yard, had resulted in seepage and oil loss.
    Two beers please, my friend is paying.

  5. #5
    Pye_End's Avatar
    Pye_End is offline Registered User
    Location : N Kent Coast
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by charles_reed View Post
    - as it was gravely disappointing in service
    Is it possible that you could add to this.

    I have one, and although given good service thus far, as you say is an aging gland and I would like to know what to problems look out for.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,709

    Default

    are the seals bespoke Halyard items or off the shelf items fitted by Halyards?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    80

    Default

    I have a Halyard seal - the type with a remote oil reservoir. It was on the boat when I bought it nine years ago - it wasn't dripping then and it isn't dripping now, some 12,000 miles later (admittedly, far fewer under motor). If yours isn't dripping water or leaking oil then its probably alright. The only problem I've had with mine was when oil leaked out when the engine became misaligned with the shaft - as soon as I re-aligned the engine the problem disappeared.

    From memory, O-rings spin with the shaft and keep the water out while lip-seals are static and keep the oil in. It is also worth noting that the set-up of the "collar" (it's not a collar at all but I can't think of the right name for it - I'm referring to the bit sticking out the front, with shaft going through it and the allen screws in) is critical. From memory, with everything at rest the "collar" should project forward from the face of the unit by about a centimetre - 12mm I think. For what it's worth, I've had the prop-shaft on my boat out and back in several times over the years. There is no problem if you are careful and the part of the shaft going through the seals is smooth (i.e. with no burring around splines or holes) and clean. The biggest risk in the process is damaging the O-rings or lip-seals by subjecting the seal to too much force.

    The fluid to top up with is Automatic Transmission Fluid or similar.

    Although the unit is no longer made, Halyard Marine were very helpful when I rang up, adnittedly some years ago, to ask questions. Spare seals were available (I think they are bought in).

    I won't worry about mine until it starts to give problems. Mine has never squealed and I suspect it is unlikely to unless the shaft is turning in the "collar" thingo - either because it is seized (highly unlikely) or because the allen screws are loose (unlikely to produce a squeal unless perhaps the "collar" moves too far in or out). Perhaps the squealing is coming from something else close to the seal?
    Last edited by kacecar; 20-07-10 at 15:36.

  8. #8
    charles_reed's Avatar
    charles_reed is offline Registered User
    Location : Home Shropshire 6/12; boat Greece 6/12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    9,288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kacecar View Post
    I have a Halyard seal - the type with a remote oil reservoir. It was on the boat when I bought it nine years ago - it wasn't dripping then and it isn't dripping now, some 12,000 miles later (admittedly, far fewer under motor). If yours isn't dripping water or leaking oil then its probably alright. The only problem I've had with mine was when oil leaked out when the engine became misaligned with the shaft - as soon as I re-aligned the engine the problem disappeared.

    From memory, O-rings spin with the shaft and keep the water out while lip-seals are static and keep the oil in. It is also worth noting that the set-up of the "collar" (it's not a collar at all but I can't think of the right name for it - I'm referring to the bit sticking out the front, with shaft going through it and the allen screws in) is critical. From memory, with everything at rest the "collar" should project forward from the face of the unit by about a centimetre - 12mm I think. For what it's worth, I've had the prop-shaft on my boat out and back in several times over the years. There is no problem if you are careful and the part of the shaft going through the seals is smooth (i.e. with no burring around splines or holes) and clean. The biggest risk in the process is damaging the O-rings or lip-seals by subjecting the seal to too much force.

    The fluid to top up with is Automatic Transmission Fluid or similar.

    Although the unit is no longer made, Halyard Marine were very helpful when I rang up, adnittedly some years ago, to ask questions. Spare seals were available (I think they are bought in).

    I won't worry about mine until it starts to give problems. Mine has never squealed and I suspect it is unlikely to unless the shaft is turning in the "collar" thingo - either because it is seized (highly unlikely) or because the allen screws are loose (unlikely to produce a squeal unless perhaps the "collar" moves too far in or out). Perhaps the squealing is coming from something else close to the seal?
    In 9 years my boat would have done nearly 3 times the mileage and more than half of that on the engine.

    The words I used were chosen with care, they're the same as were used to me by one of Halyard's directors.

    As I've pointed out - the very much simpler PSS seal has given no trouble over x3 the work-period of the Halyard.

    PS The PSS seal was the one recommended to me by Halyard - who I have to confirm, were extremely helpful and supportive in trying to get the seal to give satisfaction.
    Last edited by charles_reed; 20-07-10 at 18:47.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,709

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kacecar View Post
    I won't worry about mine until it starts to give problems. Mine has never squealed and I suspect it is unlikely to unless the shaft is turning in the "collar" thingo - either because it is seized (highly unlikely) or because the allen screws are loose (unlikely to produce a squeal unless perhaps the "collar" moves too far in or out). Perhaps the squealing is coming from something else close to the seal?
    Just to tidy up the thread - this was the problem. The allen screws had become loose and the shaft collar had moved out, re-setting it has cured the squel. Thanks for the guidance, I just wish access to the unit was a little easier!

  10. #10
    pvb's Avatar
    pvb is offline Registered User
    Location : UK East Coast
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    20,775

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kacecar View Post
    The fluid to top up with is Automatic Transmission Fluid or similar.
    I have a Halyard shaft seal, and I'm fairly sure it should be filled with engine oil.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •