Page 1 of 8 123456 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 78

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Berkshire, Somerset, Hampshire
    Posts
    3,917

    Default Please help us with your reports

    I am currently serving on an RYA safety committee and have noticed the increase in concern regarding fishing markers and the gear with which they are secured to pots. Am also very much aware, having cleared more than a few props in my time running cruise in company fleets, of the dangers posed by rope and rubbish.

    Here is an opportunity to feedback your experiences so that we might learn from them. Your username will be the only thing identifying you to the post and I will not forward your e-mail address to anybody, as is the norm on ybw.com forums.

    <hr width=100% size=1>

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    where democracy needs no guns
    Posts
    15,748

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    Floating lines are killers. Markers with additional pick-ups sometimes 10mts away with a floating line between.

    Pots marked with large enough buoys are fine, preferably with weighted lines or the lead cored line that is available. Flag markers are good too if tall enough and NOT as an additional pick-up to another buoy with floating line between.

    Old chemical cans, ball valve floats, fenders etc are a definite no no, very difficult to see and probably not belonging to any pro fisherman

    Location. I know they are put where results are expected, but harbour entrances and entrances to channels should be out of bounds.

    What are the CG or RNLI figures for assistance given to boats disabled by lines round propellors or rudders?

    <hr width=100% size=1>
    Sermons from my pulpit are with tongue firmly in cheek and without any warranty!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK, North Wales
    Posts
    902

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    Those who sail out of Pwllheli are used to the lobster pots (often badly marked) around Tremadoc Bay. However, over the past 3 weekends, there has been a fishing net within placed between the safe water mark and the entrance. It has been difficult to see and was within the race course of the Welsh Youth training squad when a sheltered course was set. I am amazed that no-one, to my knowledge, has been caught up in it.

    <hr width=100% size=1>LOM

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    4,160

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    Kim

    Lobster pots on the west coast of Scotland seem, in the main, to be reasonably marked.

    However, on the occasions I've rounded the Mull I've been concerned about the position and colour of marker bouys. They are most seen from from the Campbelton side round to the Arranman Barrels.

    Some of these bouys are in very deep water (about 100 meters) but my main concern is their colour - they are grey (possibly a job lot?)

    In the tide, they sometimes sit a foot under the surface and you can see the taught line at quite an angle.

    I wouldn't contemplate a night sail/motor in that area and would caution others to keep a good look out.

    Going further out has its own problems - you start to enter the Traffic Separation zone and in misty or poor visibility there is the chance of either hitting a pot marker or getting hit by a ship.

    Regards

    Donald



    <hr width=100% size=1>

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    St Neots
    Posts
    27,954

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    The inshore route around Portland has a few ... and its a very bad place to get stuffed. Not only that but the tide drags them below the surface!

    <hr width=100% size=1>
    Brexit: ‘taking back’ what we had never lost, in order to lose everything we had...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    280

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    Agreed. This is a real problem around the Portland in-shore passage, and often they are just below the surface.

    <hr width=100% size=1>Jerbro
    ====
    Click here for <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.btinternet.com/~jerbro> My ex-boat pics</A>

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Gosport
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    First may I thank you for putting up this forum.

    Personal experience.

    Needles Channel has lobster pots in the main fairway. They are usualy the small orange ball kind but often are gallon or larger oil/water cans in black. They are almost exclusively unmarked with any owners details.

    At the start of the RORC Bayona race last year in a SW F5 with a spring ebbing tide I tacked across the main fairway of the Needles Channel and caught a pot which was floated by a dark blue 25 or 50 litre plastic fuel type can. This was laying to tide and was almost invisible. It caught around the rudder and we had a wild broach to windward before the rudder ripped off. We then called the coastguard who in turn called the Yarmouth lifeboat. Meanwhile we drifted across the breaking waves on the Shingles bank and narrowly missed a grounding before we deployed the anchor.
    According to the RNLI the rescue cost them in the region of £7,000.
    The tow back to Gosport and the new rudder cost an additional £3,400 plus £4,200 compensation for the charter crew.
    Had I know who owned the pot I would with certainty have sued them.

    This month I sailed from Gosport to Falmouth for the AZAB race. I have made this passage may times and this is what I noticed on route.
    Generaly a marked increase in the number of lobster pots mainly small balls or 1 gallon cans. Dartmouth is absolutely saturated with pots which present a very real hazard for any night time approach. Having seen them by day I wouldn't remotely consider a night approach and to be honest would when possible avoid Dartmouth all together.
    Start Point is another area of great concern because of the overfalls and although on this occasion I went through there in 30 knots of wind against tide I had to dodge about a dozen. I dread to think how one would cope with being hooked in such dangerous waters.

    Salcombe to Plymouth there are field of pots mainly but not exclusively topped by a flack and post. Again on a dark night you would be very lucky to see these.

    Plymouth to Fowey field of pots are mainly scattered to the south of the Fowey approach again mainly black flagged.

    Plymouth has a significant number of pots extending out from the harbour but again nothing like the concentration found outside Dartmouth.

    Falmouth and approaches there are lobster pots but not in any serious concentration and again black flagged.

    According to the staff at QAB Plymouth the MOD Police recognise the hazard and occasionaly clear poorly marked pots but the frequency of this event is unknown to me. They did however report a rather disturbing trend of fitting a wire for the last ten or fifteen feet of the rope to stop prop cutters cutting through and the incidence of boats being towed in o Plymouth because of fouled props is increasing.
    Another interesting fact from QAB is that there is an ever increasing number of ordinary people who are equipping themselves with half a dozen pots, nipping out in a small boat and dropping them wherever they see fit.

    Seperately I know that Christchurch Ledge is saturated with pots and the North Channel entrance to the Western Solent (traditionaly recommended to be the entrance used in stong winds) is also densely populated by pots.

    My submittion would be that in my experience the pots on the South coast represent a real and present danger to small boats of all types. I am certain that these hazards are not confined to the South coast and other areas of the UK suffer just as badly. On a recent trip back from France I noticed a number of pots on a coal black night because they had small flashing lights on them. I also think that the use of black flags on a short lead from the marker buoy is very helpful not only in seeing the pot but also to gain an indication of the tidal flow affecting that particular pot. Although at night I agree that you only see these things when they are very close.

    If you went for a walk in the Countryside and had to dodge snares there would be hell to pay and the practice would we stopped. I am not advocating that no-one is allowed to deploy pots but those that do should do so in designated areas with pots marked with the owners details. Black flag and a light.

    Please take the time to add your thoughts/comments/observations/experiences with regard to pots because if we are going to affect anything we need evidence to present to the RYA. If we don't do anything it will get worse and we will suffer because of it.

    Richard Houghton



    <hr width=100% size=1>

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    london
    Posts
    568

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    I often sail over to Brittany and I think that the French have a good idea- any pot
    buoys have to be marked with your boat registration number. Any unmarked pot
    buoys can be removed by coastguards etc. Amateur fishermen are restricted in the number of pots they can lay (3 I think). The professional fishermen out there
    use floats with a pole and a flag or some times large pink buoys.
    The cheap polypropylene line that floats should either be outlawed or people
    made to weight it down with lead weights.
    In company with some friends I chartered a boat out of St Malo, and as we
    sailed out in the main channel between the Grand Jardin lighthouse and some rocks we snagged a pot buoy - there was a flag marker but the helm did not see it. The boat stopped dead as the rope had caught between the top of the rudder and the hull. It was too risky to run the engine to reverse and there was no room to manoeuver . Luckily the boat had a sugarscoop stern and the marker was cut off. This was not the end of our predicament as another buoy then popped up-we were still attached. A rolling hitch was put on the pot line to try to pull it up on the winch-it proved to be too heavy.
    Reluctantly the other marker was cut off as well and we were free. It was probably
    an expensive loss for the boat that laid the pots, but better that than endanger our
    boat and crew.
    Regards, Phil

    <hr width=100% size=1>

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    5,211

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    Kim

    This committee you are on also has a member of the RNLI, I recall? The RNLI break their SAR activities down and the last set I got (2001) showed a remarkable number (I thought) of such incidents. I've a notion that it was one of the more frequent causes of powered (inboard) sailing craft rescues ...

    <hr width=100% size=1>

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Haslemere/ Evia Island
    Posts
    7,450

    Default Re: Please help us with your reports

    Kim - about time this got some serious attention. Luckily with a long keeled yacht I have not had the misfortune to suffer this problem.

    I sail out of Plymouth. On the Cornish side, pots appear to be marked predominantly with flags and are easy to see. However turn left and go to Salcombe, and you don't see a single pot marked in this way. Indeed there seems an increased us of the method of using a couple of fishing floats, which are then attached to a plastic container tied to the floats for floating polyprop line. This of course means that you have a much larger target to hit if the floating line is 12 feet across!!! They ought to be shot - hung drawn and quatered - and .....

    When I was in Mevagissy last time, I noticed that the fishermen were making up ployprop lines by entrining them in a fine line with lead shot so that the lines would sink.


    <hr width=100% size=1>

Page 1 of 8 123456 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to