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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by dylanwinter View Post
    BBC recipe

    now is the sheeps stomach inside or outside the can



    1 sheep's stomach or ox secum, cleaned and thoroughly, scalded, turned inside out and soaked overnight in cold salted water

    heart and lungs of one lamb

    450g/1lb beef or lamb trimmings, fat and lean

    2 onions, finely chopped

    225g/8oz oatmeal

    1 tbsp salt

    1 tsp ground black pepper

    1 tsp ground dried coriander

    1 tsp mace

    1 tsp nutmeg

    water, enough to cook the haggis

    stock from lungs and trimmings
    Of course haggis in a real sheep's stomach is better and even the plastic substitute isn't too bad, but I don't think they'd keep as well in the bilges as the tins.

    I'm a bit dubious about your recipe, it sounds a bit posh for haggis, although I guess that depends upon the interpretation of 'trimmings'.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    1,482

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    Quote Originally Posted by prv View Post
    I had to read that three times before I realised it didn't say "ox rectum".

    Pete
    If it is meant to be "caecum" then it is a higher-up bit of the same plumbing - a dead-end between the small and large intestines, where the appendix is in humans.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by prv View Post
    I had to read that three times before I realised it didn't say "ox rectum".

    Pete
    I think the correct term for that is trimmings, at least according to the BBC.

  4. #64
    William_H is offline Registered User
    Location : West Australia
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    Jul 2003
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    [QUOTE=NOHOH;2743680]Of course you are going to die Dylan...just like the rest of us......but probably not from exploding cans........

    About 950 years ago, one of my student summer jobs was working in a canning factory. The full cans , complete with lids were put inside an `autoclave`....like a giant pressure cooker..and steam heated to some fantastic temperature and pressure...to cook and sterilize the food.......If they can withstand that...they can withstand being put in hot water for 20 mins or so. Quote

    I Can't let that go without correction. An autoclave heats under pressure. The pressure on the outside of the can balances the pressure in the can so no risk of explosion.
    So we can' t use that example as an indication of the safety of heating sealed cans. However if can is boiled in water then there will be no explosion of can unless water boils dry or can gets hotter than temp of boiling water. olewill

  5. #65
    prv is offline Registered User
    Location : Southampton
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrendanS View Post
    You do realise you are now describing Fray Bentos pies, aka FB pies, and every time I describe them as dog food, however cooked, I get flamed by aficionados.
    Of course, since FB pies get heated in an oven (and then, the only time I've ever encountered them on a boat, tipped onto the cabin sole) rather than boiled, they don't conform to Dylan's Law of Unopened Tins. I have heard of FB pie explosions taking place (not on a boat) when someone grasped the "bake in the tin" idea but didn't actually read the instructions.

    Pete

  6. #66
    Bob_Ranft is offline Registered User
    Location : Working in the Philippines
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    Jun 2006
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    I work in the food can making industry. As you mention many food cans are subjected to what is known as a "Retort Process". Batches of cans are placed in what is essentially a large pressure cooker and are steam sterilised typically at 121c for 30 minutes. Depending on the contents some cans are sterlised at 132c for 45 minutes.

    For the internally lacquered cans and externally printed cans, for my part I must ensure that there is no loss of adhesion, no change of colour, to either the internal lacquers or external print following retort. All food can making factories have retort simulating equipment in their QC labs.

    Basically problems with exploding cans are never encountered even at the elevated temperatures that retort processes subject cans to. Only problem we tend to get is the mess that can be difficult and time consuming to clean up when cans on which the ends have not been seamed on correctly leak all over the others.

    Cup of coffee and back to making cans

    Bob

  7. #67
    nimbusgb is offline Registered User
    Location : A long way from my boat! :(
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    Oct 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosun Higgs View Post
    I always though that things like stew were put into cans at the factory raw and the cans were heated to cook the product thus ensuring no possibility of contamination / going bad. Anyone know if this is correct?
    A lot of goods are cooked in the can yes.

    Lots of pointless stuff http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publication...ions_usda.html
    "Tomorrow to fresh woods and pastures new"

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    7,761

    Default Exploding can risks disaster

    Quote Originally Posted by Fire99 View Post
    Maybe have a crack at that over a tin of alphabetti-spaghetti
    If the can explodes it will spell disaster.


    Okay, okay, I know where the door is.
    Having time is unavoidable.

  9. #69
    DogWatch Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by dylanwinter View Post
    for many years I have been cooking my meals by placing two unopened cans on their side in a saucepan of water and bringing it slowly to the boil in a covered steel saucepan

    >>>>More culinary foody advice snipped<<<<

    Dylan
    Gosh it's true! owning a yacht is like an entry ticket to the millionaire club.

    It's stuff like this that explains why so many men sail alone isn't it?

  10. #70
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    Aug 2009
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    Having spent a culinary miserable year on a yacht eating re-hydrated or canned food. The smell of concentrated http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosodium_glutamate reminds me of those days.

    Boil yer cans all you want, but I'll go for fresh as often as possible.
    Having time is unavoidable.

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