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  1. #11
    Thistle's Avatar
    Thistle is offline Registered User
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    Very surprised that no-one has mentioned anti-seasickness tablets (eg stugeron). First Aiders cannot, of course , give these out but crew prone to mal de mer may appreciate their ready availability and a first aid kit seems to be a logical place to keep them.

  2. #12
    Porthandbuoy's Avatar
    Porthandbuoy is online now Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thistle View Post
    Very surprised that no-one has mentioned anti-seasickness tablets (eg stugeron). First Aiders cannot, of course , give these out but crew prone to mal de mer may appreciate their ready availability and a first aid kit seems to be a logical place to keep them.
    Even better are the scopalomine anti-nausea patches. They used to be available on private prescription but you might be able to ask the pharmacist for them now. They are superb when the victim can keep nothing down, not even tablets.
    www.backbearing.com. Astronavigation resources.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shearwater View Post
    what do you have
    My doctors phone number.


    .
    Sailing in a windy Scotland www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_-AJqWB9Ks

  4. #14
    Ubergeekian's Avatar
    Ubergeekian is offline Registered User
    Location : Me: Castle Douglas, SW Scotland. Boats: Kirkcudbright, Loch Ken, Port Bannatyne
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porthandbuoy View Post
    On the subject of painkillers. What are the most effective you can legally buy in the UK?
    Co-codamol is pretty dashed effective. I had super large ones prescribed for a dental abcess, and although you can only buy weaker ones over the counter, there's nothing to stop you taking two. Loads of paracetamol, though, so ca' canny or lose your liver.
    Last edited by Ubergeekian; 13-01-11 at 23:20.

  5. #15
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    Best to think of what can go wrong. Pain = painkillers. Prob best available over the counter as long as no allergies or asthma is Ibuprofen 400mg for adults . For dental bits , either sticking crowns or bridges back on again, repairing broken cusps or lost a filling there is a great powder which you mix with water into a light syrup consistency. Sets in a min. generic name glass ionomer. Ask your very friendly dentist for a couple of tea spoons of the powder for a nice bottle of vino! Store it in a 35mm film canister nice and dry. For bleeding apply constant pressure with a clean pack, keep it raised pref above level of the heart. For life threatening blood loss possibly a tourniquet and I'd be on my radio quick!!! Dioralite(? spelling) as someone said before is THE way to get fluids and salts back into someone with severe D+V typically sea sickness. Nik

  6. #16
    john_morris_uk is offline Registered User
    Location : Home near Exeter, work in Hampshire, boat in Plymouth
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    We cary lots of the above - but I was fortunate to be sent on a 'Ship's Captain's Medical Course' a few years ago so have a little ticket that says I can carry antibiotics and rather stronger painkillers than you can carry over the counter. I still phone/radio a doctor to check which ones to give out if I am not sure.

    If you can't manage to get onto such a course, a proper tourniquet is a life saver for major blood loss. (For example all Brit forces carry one on their person when in Afghanistan as the evidence is that many US died in Vietnam through blood loss!) The new style Field Dressings are much more about compression than absorbing. They are elastic bandages that are very good - and I will get some for the boat when I get a chance.

    We then carry steri-strips, tweezers, dioralyte (as already mentioned) plasters, bandages, a First Aid Book.

    Drugs normally include some painkillers (Ibobrufen, Paracetemol and Dihydrocodeine as a little further up the scale)

    When we go further offshore, we carry needles, gut, local anesthetic and splints etc etc.

    When we eventually go long term cruising we will also fit a safe for some Diamorphine (to comply with the regulations for carriage of such drugs on ships at sea) and a copy of the Ship's Captains Medical guide.
    Last edited by john_morris_uk; 14-01-11 at 08:03.
    [B][I]Wishing things away is not effective.[/I][/B]

  7. #17
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    If you are heading offshore your friendly GP will probably prescribe painkillers for you with instruction plus antibiotics. We are lucky in that ours also agreed for me to call his mobile anytime when we were Transat. Had Falmouth MRCC on sat phone preset 1 and GP as 2!!! Fortunately didn't need to use and returned the medicine on return..
    It's never to late to Gap......
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  8. #18
    prv is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    my mother found this out the hard way when she had her fingers mangled by their anchor chain in Newtown Creek...
    Apart from pain killers (which we can't carry very good ones) and strapping it up till you get ashore, what more can a typical coastal sailor really do?

    (Genuine question - that's all I can think of doing, but I'd be glad to hear better advice)

    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    It's a bit frustrating we can't carry more effective pain killers, and personally I think it ludicrous a good first aid course isn't included in school lessons
    I left school in 2000, and we had first-aid lessons then. It was officially part of Biology, for want of a better place to put it. I assumed it had been included as a national standard, in the same way that GCSE Physics included how to wire a plug, but perhaps the first aid was just my school's local (and very worthwhile) addition? It was a good school for teaching "outside the box".

    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    One addition to the Kit I do recommend is Dioralyte Oral Electrolyte Powder,
    Good idea. I will add some.

    Pete

  9. #19
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    This is in my First Aid kit:



    They fall under several general headings
    Skin, disinfection, burns
    Bandages, bleeding, dressings
    Fever, pain, anti-inflammatories
    Digestion, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting
    Infections, antibiotics
    Allergies
    Ears / eyes

    Edit - FWIW, I also have a small "day" first aid kit - antiseptic wipes, antibiotic cream, small bandages etc.

    And for long passages, baby diaper rash cream.
    Last edited by bbg; 14-01-11 at 12:22.
    Apartment for rent in Klosters, Switzerland http://goo.gl/HKIcgK

  10. #20
    shaunksb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john_morris_uk View Post
    If you can't manage to get onto such a course, a proper tourniquet is a life saver for major blood loss.
    I was taught not to use a tourniquet as it can cause more damage but to use a fist at the top of the arm or in the groin and elevate the limb.

    I had to use this on someone who severed an artery in their arm and kept them alive for a quarter of an hour until the medics arrived.

    .
    Sailing in a windy Scotland www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_-AJqWB9Ks

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