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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    13,227

    Default

    Funnily enough, I looked at it shortly after it was built. It was very nice and VERY pricey. But too small.

    I bought an eight year old HR36 instead.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Wales and Bristol Channel, UK
    Posts
    2,302

    Default

    Without a doubt, the marine ply would need extensive attention by now. I have totally refurbished a 26 ft marine ply boat many years ago; it is easy but time consuming; I ended up replacing ply panels (8 by ft) which was easier than repairing patches. Also, the structural integrity relies on the uniformity of the ply panel structure. Usually, the chine edges rot and the boat looses its strength. Ply is light and very strong in all directions but obviously rots. No ply will last more than 25 years without water penetrating the edges. In most cases, rain water penetrates through the deck which rots the wood; unlike sea water which "pickles" the wood. Unless the GH had major refurbishment, It would not worth much.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    525

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JimHaynes View Post
    In 1978 I ordered a Golden Hind 31 from Terry Erskine Yachts, and took delivery in Plymouth in February 1979 after retiring from the US Air Force with the intent of circumnavigating. To learn rough weather sailing and coastal navigation in rapidly changing and strong coastal currents, a person from the Royal Western Yacht Club took my wife and myself under his wing to teach us by sailing with us up and down the English Channel and making several crossings of the heavily trafficked ship channels to French coastal towns and the Channel Islands. We left in August 1979 only to be caught in the Bay of Biscay 40 miles after rounding Ushant enroute to Cape Finnesterre. We gradually stripped the deck and sails below, and lay ahull quartering up the 50 - 60 ft. breaking waves. We were knocked down a couple times and rolled upside down once by an extra large surf-style breaking wave only to be brought back up by the back side of the wave. Terry had recommended the shorter ocean sailing mast and the extra quartering aft shroud, which I firmly believe prevented us from losing the mast. After riding the storm, lashed in our quarter berths during the entire time after removing all sails, the only damage resulting was torn cockpit weather cloths on the port side of the cockpit.

    Over the next 8 years, we put over 50,000 miles total, with over 40,000 ocean miles. As far as I am concerned, The MG designed and Terry Erskine built Golden Hind 31 is one of the best ocean and coastal cruising sailboat for a couple. In addition to its sensible and safe cruising/sailing attributes, it has more storage space for long distance cruising than sailboats 6 - 7 feet longer. We could easily store over 6 months worth of provisions as well as necessary and common equipment. I sold the boat, "HALEKAI", only when I had to go back to Texas to care for elderly and very sick parents. We surely miss her and hope that she is keeping her new owners safe.

    Jim & Kitty Haynes
    That's a nice story, Jim. Thanks for recounting it. (It also shows what a good designer MG was.)

    Quote Originally Posted by VicS View Post
    ... there are two Eventide websites. The Eventide Owners Association and the Eventide Owners Group as the result of a serious disagreement between committee members some years ago.
    This is absolutely true. You should ignore the old EOA website (if it still exists) and concentrate on the EOG site. The site has a page devoted to the Golden Hinds here -- http://www.eventides.org.uk/goldpic.htm

    and there's an EOG forum here -- http://www.eventides.org.uk/forum/in...3e125f02da9962

    Mike
    ... helping people complete classic boats authentically.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    7

    Default Storm in August 1979

    Quote Originally Posted by doug748 View Post
    " We left in August 1979 only to be caught in the Bay of Biscay 40 miles after rounding Ushant enroute to Cape Finnesterre. We gradually stripped the deck and sails below, and lay ahull quartering up the 50 - 60 ft. breaking waves. We were knocked down a couple times and rolled upside down once by an extra large surf-style breaking wave only to be brought back up by the back side of the wave." - JimHaynes



    Not around the 14th by any chance!

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/d...00/3886877.stm
    Yes, it was the Fastnet storm. The BBC weather report had not yet broadcasted the change in the previous forecast, but we saw swells coming from the NW conflicting with the prevalent ones coming from the SW. Those NW swells were quickly becoming larger, so we started preparing for a major change. We were down to merely a storm staysail by time the very large swells started breaking. That's when we cleared the deck, rigged for laying ahull quartering up the waves, and went below and strapped in. Scared out of our minds for the next 7 - 8 hours.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    eastbourne uk
    Posts
    119

    Default

    The repair of a plywood GH is documented here:

    http://www.eventides.org.uk/builder37.htm

    It gives some indication of the work that might be involved.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Home Shropshire 6/12; boat Greece 6/12
    Posts
    10,419

    Default

    Great thread about one of the great "vernacular" British boats, especially Jim Haynes' unsolicited testimonial.
    I started sailing about the heyday of the "big" Golden Hinds which, though looked down upon by the racing fraternity, showed a considerable turn of speed off the wind, with the full height mast. Whilst the Eventide was a forebear, the GRP Golden Hinds were a far cry from the originals and seem to have survived as treasured relics of the golden age of British sailing.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South UK
    Posts
    549

    Default

    I owned an early wooden one for 10 years and she taught me all the basics of cruising, for which I will always be grateful.
    In the end the relentless maintenance wore me down and she was the last wooden boat I owned.
    I sold her for more than twice what I paid for her which you cant do these days.
    So unless you are a wooden boat nut or have shed-loads of cash to throw away I would steer clear of 40+ year old plywood boats.

    Plank
    Hang the Rich.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Advice on Golden Hind 31

    Quote Originally Posted by JimHaynes View Post
    In 1978 I ordered a Golden Hind 31 from Terry Erskine Yachts, and took delivery in Plymouth in February 1979 after retiring from the US Air Force with the intent of circumnavigating. To learn rough weather sailing and coastal navigation in rapidly changing and strong coastal currents, a person from the Royal Western Yacht Club took my wife and myself under his wing to teach us by sailing with us up and down the English Channel and making several crossings of the heavily trafficked ship channels to French coastal towns and the Channel Islands. We left in August 1979 only to be caught in the Bay of Biscay 40 miles after rounding Ushant enroute to Cape Finnesterre. We gradually stripped the deck and sails below, and lay ahull quartering up the 50 - 60 ft. breaking waves. We were knocked down a couple times and rolled upside down once by an extra large surf-style breaking wave only to be brought back up by the back side of the wave. Terry had recommended the shorter ocean sailing mast and the extra quartering aft shroud, which I firmly believe prevented us from losing the mast. After riding the storm, lashed in our quarter berths during the entire time after removing all sails, the only damage resulting was torn cockpit weather cloths on the port side of the cockpit.

    Over the next 8 years, we put over 50,000 miles total, with over 40,000 ocean miles. As far as I am concerned, The MG designed and Terry Erskine built Golden Hind 31 is one of the best ocean and coastal cruising sailboat for a couple. In addition to its sensible and safe cruising/sailing attributes, it has more storage space for long distance cruising than sailboats 6 - 7 feet longer. We could easily store over 6 months worth of provisions as well as necessary and common equipment. I sold the boat, "HALEKAI", only when I had to go back to Texas to care for elderly and very sick parents. We surely miss her and hope that she is keeping her new owners safe.

    Jim & Kitty Haynes
    She has been renamed "Thane of Lochaber" and is currently for sale at port edgar marina, Scotland. At a glance she looks to be well maintained. Photo of the builders plate in the brokerage listing shows hull no 31.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Advice on Golden Hind 31

    Quote Originally Posted by Bazw View Post
    She has been renamed "Thane of Lochaber" and is currently for sale at port edgar marina, Scotland. At a glance she looks to be well maintained. Photo of the builders plate in the brokerage listing shows hull no 31.
    If it shows hull #31, then I don't think it was my GH 31, which was sail number #183. I am assuming that the hull number is the same as the sail number.

    Jim Haynes, Richmond, Texas, USA

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Advice on Golden Hind 31

    Quote Originally Posted by JimHaynes View Post
    If it shows hull #31, then I don't think it was my GH 31, which was sail number #183. I am assuming that the hull number is the same as the sail number.

    Jim Haynes, Richmond, Texas, USA
    Sorry, I miss-read your original post. Sorry for any confusion. Baz

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