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  1. #41
    vyv_cox's Avatar
    vyv_cox is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by prv View Post
    I think you missed mine
    In that case, sorry.
    Answers to some technical queries at http://coxengineering.sharepoint.com

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by prv View Post
    I'm surprised this is news to so many people.
    I'm not particularly surprised it is news to many owners. It takes some experience to have the realisation to ask the questions, and to know what to look for in the answers. It is so much easier now with the likes of forums to help new owners gain an understanding of what is going on.

    The first time I changed underwater metal components I went into a decent chandlers and bought 'marine' items, which I had assumed were fit for purpose. I am shocked that we now find that they may not be. It now looks as though even staying away from plumbers merchants is not enough.

  3. #43
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    Having read the "Random Harvest" report posted by Vyv Cox I was amazed to see corrosion rates of 1.3mm per annum quoted for a "marine " fitting.
    The chandlers should be challenged for selling goods "not fit for purpose".

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHUG View Post
    Having read the "Random Harvest" report posted by Vyv Cox I was amazed to see corrosion rates of 1.3mm per annum quoted for a "marine " fitting.
    The chandlers should be challenged for selling goods "not fit for purpose".
    Shug, they are fit for certain service applications, its the application of the fitting specification that is not clear to the user. Its also a fact that the RCD may allow inferior fittings on production boats because that fitting can last 5 years!

    Its not a chandler problem although I think there is a certain amount of lazy product marking (marketing) on all packaging. Buyer do your homework!
    Having time is unavoidable.

  5. #45
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    Its also the buyers continual demand to buy cheaply, helped by the manufacturers growing skill at making cheap tat look high quality.

    I returned some shackles to a chandler a year or two ago that came in some smart packaging, one of the new brands that has appeared on the market in recent years. On close inspection the shackles were of very dubious quality, very poor casting that would have stood little load.

    I gave myself a slap and bought the same size Winchard ones, yes much more expensive, but I reminded myself, 'buy cheap buy twice'.
    "You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today
    And then one day you find ten years have got behind you"
    Roger Waters 1972

  6. #46
    prv is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlowingOldBoots View Post
    Shug, they are fit for certain service applications, its the application of the fitting specification that is not clear to the user. [...] Its not a chandler problem although I think there is a certain amount of lazy product marking (marketing) on all packaging. Buyer do your homework!
    I think it is a chandler problem when I can't walk into Force 4 and buy a fitting I can rely on. I know exactly what I need, but they seem to throw everything into a big tray, unmarked, and stir well. There's no way for me to know what any particular part is made from.

    I bought all my plumbing from ASAP for this reason.

    Pete

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pye_End View Post
    It now looks as though even staying away from plumbers merchants is not enough.
    Plumbers merchants can be a good source of DZR fittings. 60/40 brass is OK for plumbing fittings in hard water areas but in soft water they will corrode. In this case DZR is the recommended alternative. Many plumbers now stock them, recognisable because they will always be marked as such.

    In valves and seacocks, anything plated is dubious. Again, DZR ones will be marked.
    Answers to some technical queries at http://coxengineering.sharepoint.com

  8. #48
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    No time mto read through every post so I may be repeating what someone has already said. The YM article names a couple of boat builders who are using these fittings and implies there are lots of other AWBs equipped with them. If they are so unreliable then, why havent we got a plague of boat sinkings?

    personally I reckon its a bit of scaremongering. Sure the fittings have a lifetime as indeed lots of other things on your boat have including rigging and mast. But without an electrical problem I reckon the life has to be way more than 5 years or boats would be sinking all over the place.

  9. #49
    prv is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosun Higgs View Post
    I reckon the life has to be way more than 5 years or boats would be sinking all over the place.
    I guess the question is when did they start doing it?

    Pete

  10. #50
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    It may just be starting to rear its head:

    http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread.php?t=271854

    Looks like my experience was not isolated. Now having read the article, and absorbed the comments on the two threads running, I will be replacing all my seacocks next lift out. The boat is 1993. I may just use plastic.
    "You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today
    And then one day you find ten years have got behind you"
    Roger Waters 1972

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