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Thread: Possible?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Thanks appreciate the effort in posting that link, I'm sure something will turn up, something always does

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    S.W. France
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    7,681

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    While not in the market at the moment.. A huge amount of work can be done DIY, if one researches. Sails, rigging and fittings can be done for the cost of materials, if inclined..esp. if the boat is in the smaller, circa 20ft size.
    There was a piece on in PBO on restoring a 24ft rough GRP example up to sale-able status. But it was several years ago ( Achiles ) Doubt if the economics apply now ( if they ever did, if one counts the hours)
    This is not a logical area, boats never are.

    My in-laws had a cushin embroidered with the words " A boat is a hole in the water into which you pour money" They had several.. But used them often.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    A tiny Island, Caribbean
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    16,964

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    Quote Originally Posted by DownWest View Post
    My in-laws had a cushin embroidered with the words " A boat is a hole in the water into which you pour money" They had several.. But used them often.
    Could be expanded to:

    " A boat is a hole in the water into which you pour money in increasing amounts with alarming regularity"
    RELAX, Rum may not be the answer, but nor is water or juice. Now what is your Question?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    A tiny Island, Caribbean
    Posts
    16,964

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    have a look here

    http://woodenboatrescue.org/

    and have a read here http://yachtpals.com/free-boat-9065

    an excerpt:

    we've figured out a formula for boats that has withstood the test of time (or at least kept us away from a number of money pits).
    Here it is: Take what you would spend to buy the boat, and add the cost of all of the things you want done to the boat as if you were going to hire a yard to do it, buying all new equipment.
    Sure, you may be doing all or at least part of the work yourself, and you may be able to scrounge and salvage parts, but for the time being and the sake of argument, just say that you are going to have everything done at yard rates.

    Add it all up.

    Now, honestly:
    Could you realistically expect to sell the boat for that price (your purchase price + the all of the boatyard labor and parts for upgrades and repairs) in two months time?

    Example 1: a $150,000 boat that has been kept up and maintained, is well equipped, requires no repairs, and can be sold to someone else for that price within two months is a good deal.

    Example 2: A free boat, which needs new water tanks, fuel tanks and plumbing, new rigging, new bulkheads, a new deck, prep, paint and varnish inside and out, etc., etc., etc., and which wouldn't fetch $80,000 after you'd sunk $150,000 in the boat yard - that's a very bad deal!
    Last edited by Rum_Pirate; 08-04-11 at 19:56. Reason: add excerpt
    RELAX, Rum may not be the answer, but nor is water or juice. Now what is your Question?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Me: Castle Douglas, SW Scotland. Boats: Kirkcudbright, Loch Ken, Port Bannatyne
    Posts
    9,905

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    Quote Originally Posted by playford View Post
    I saw that solani class 38ft boat put up here in bangor went for £700! would it be possible to restore something like that without it costing tens of thousands.
    No. That's why it went for £700.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Carribbean currently Grenada
    Posts
    6,818

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    Quote Originally Posted by playford View Post
    I grew up around my dad tinkering with boats and stripping anti fouling lol

    Now I've wanted my own boat for a while but cost of a lot of the fancier marinas was just too much, plus didnt want to pay fortunes to have a boat on hardstanding as I restored it. I've since found this place, near me and looks pretty decent and might be somewhere I can restore a boat. £80 a year membership (plus joining fee)

    http://eastbelfastyachtclub.yolasite.com/

    would it be possible you think to get a decent sized boat and restore it myself?

    I saw that solani class 38ft boat put up here in bangor went for £700! would it be possible to restore something like that without it costing tens of thousands. I'm aware I'm after a champagne lifestyle for lemonade money.

    but if can keep mooring charges down and do the work myself? My dad could give me a hand as regards the engines etc.

    if someone could bring me down to earth here and a bit of experience/realism.. lol
    Rather than a wooden boat consider something unloved in ferrocement. Unloved but all there, and just needing sorting out. At all costs avoid the engineless mastless hulls but something that is more or less all there but is someones abandoned poject or dream.

    A quick google found this one

    http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi..._id=31624&url=

    OK it is in California but this sort of thing turns up every so often in the UK sub £5k

    Or this one is nearer to being ready to go

    http://yachts.apolloduck.co.uk/display.phtml?aid=182473 £10k OBO [and it is a classic]

    Old Bob does OK in the Antigua Classic races to!
    Last edited by TQA; 17-06-11 at 13:03.
    Monkey patching programmer [retired ]

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Poole, Dorset
    Posts
    25

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    Yes, good luck, but enthusiasm and dreams for a beautiful old 38 footer could rapidly become a financial nightmare even if you don't actually do anything to her! Costs of storage and transport escalate rapidly with size, so something around 20ft which is possible to store and transport youself may be more realistic, and you can still have your dreams!
    In my area, Poole, I know of several small wooden cruisers looking for good homes, their owners having become too old or frail to keep them.
    If you view my post "Raffles" you can see how I unintentionally came by another wooden boat. I started trying to save it because I couldn't bear to see it being broken up by gales, but am now the owner, with yet another project!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    27

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    @ergo The boat yard im going to see is £80 a year to keep a boat there, hardstanding or mudberth.

    Went down to the Irish boat jumble this weekend in carrickfergus, not much in the way of boats sadly. Came home with a packet of wire wool lol.

    Lovely marina though, I could actually see myself living there, showers, on site electric, supermarket, cinema, nice cafes and pubs and its 20 mins on train into Belfast.

    funny someone mentioned ferro cement, the boat yard in east belfast I'm going to see on sunday seems to do a lot of this oddly. Going up to meet them this sunday, so will report back.

    I can do painting and varnishing and a lot of the routine bits etc and my dad can give me a hand with engines, he's qualified to do marine gas installation work as well. so all that would help cost wise. I think a lot is going to depend on whether I want a smaller boat for pottering around on or something bigger I could live on (I'm not married/no kids) so it would only be me and my gf visiting a couple of nights a week.

    Boats seem to be much more expensive in NI though to the north of england.

    I need to get into a decent boatyard as you always here of stuff going that way rather than on gumtree/ebay or something like that.

    I appreciate peoples comments arounf buying cheap and expensive restoration v paying more and less work as well.
    Last edited by playford; 11-04-11 at 08:20.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    27

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    well went to see boatyard today, loads of room for hardstanding and electric available onsite, so perfect for a restoration project really.

    6 weeks wait to become a member, Cant see anything I would want to being on site being a problem, some very big boats there, but loads of space and not too fussy about mess from restoration etc.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    222

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    I bought a book called ''this old boat '' which helped me a lot. Good books can both inspire and educate.

    Do NOT buy the first boat you can afford. I did and sold her 6 years later having spent hundreds on bits and pieces, epoxy and fibreglass. I sold her a year ago and the bloke who bought her was working on her on the weekend and looked no further forward. You will often spend more buying a ''bargain'' that needs a little tlc than buying a boat that can be used.

    Regards

    Carl

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