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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    - up to my neck in it.
    Posts
    26,802

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    Turn the bloody fridge off overnight, you aren't using it while asleep.
    Boaty junk clogging up your shed or lockers? Chuck it in Marinaskip

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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,116

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    Blackbeard has the best idea if it is just for a weekend and the container is well insulated. You can suppliment this by also running the fridge and then the drain on the batteries will be far less.

    PeterGibbs has fallen into the trap of believing running a full fridge/freezer is more economic than an empty one. IT ISN'T. The rate of heat transfer is solely down to the insulation of the container NOT the content - that is what determines the amount the fridge runs and therefore the battery drain.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    North Wales, sailing Aegean Sea or Menai Strait
    Posts
    21,712

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    Answers to the OP and to Mark-M. Until recently I had 2 x 110 Ah domestic batteries powering a Waeco fridge using a Danfoss 35 water cooled compressor unit. This consumes about 4 A when it starts, reducing to about 3 A before the thermostat cuts it off. On balance the fridge runs for about 33% of the time, 24 hours per day, in Greece. If I turn it off at night the internal temperature will easily reach 20C by morning, so don't assume it is safe to do this. I have 125 Watts of solar panel and a Sterling alternator regulator.

    With two batteries I found that two days was the maximum time that I could continue to run the fridge, voltage often being down to less than 12.0 first thing in the morning before the panels began to produce. I have now increased to three domestic batteries, increasing the typical early morning voltage to 12.2 or 12.3V.

    Before I had the solar panels I always had to charge on engine in the mornings to replace power consumed by the fridge overnight (in UK). With the Sterling unit it takes almost exactly an hour before it goes into float mode. Without this I would imagine a far longer time might be needed.

    Don't even think about a 3-way 230V/12V/gas fridge. Their electrical consumption is enormous.
    Answers to some technical queries at new website http://coxeng.co.uk

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    4,265

    Default

    Having just replaced my Waeco thermostat (fridge was staying on permanently) I was going to post and ask what temperature do you try to achieve in your fridges?

    I understand that keeping beer cool has a different priority to uncooked meat and that ambient temperature and insulation all have an impact but reading about domestic fridges gives a target figure of about 4 degrees.

    We seem to run at about 8 degrees and haven't died yet.

    The 7-9 degree cycle causes the fridge to come on for about 10 mins every 35 so the above figures of 30% running time seems right.

    The fridge uses 4ah when running so over a 24 period we get through 32ah which from one of our 220ah batteries gives a running time of about 4 days until the battery is half discharged.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    North Wales, sailing Aegean Sea or Menai Strait
    Posts
    21,712

    Default

    We try to aim at around 5C but, like you, it often seems to come out at 7 - 8C. One very clear observation is that beer bought in tavernas is always much colder than the stuff that comes out of our fridge, and I confess that beers provided on boats we visit seems colder than ours. Maybe we ought to turn it down a bit!
    Answers to some technical queries at new website http://coxeng.co.uk

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Coast UK
    Posts
    2,872

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    Quote Originally Posted by Searush View Post
    Turn the bloody fridge off overnight, you aren't using it while asleep.
    That's a bit out of order, the OP is a new user and you don't know where he's based...

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    - up to my neck in it.
    Posts
    26,802

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by djbreeze View Post
    That's a bit out of order, the OP is a new user and you don't know where he's based...
    How bad do you think the insulation is for it to get hot overnight with the door shut??? Even if he's on the equator it's hardly likely to be a problem. So it's not "out of order", it's simply a sensible, practical & realistic suggestion. What's your idea, buy a generator & run that all night?
    Boaty junk clogging up your shed or lockers? Chuck it in Marinaskip

    Want a used bike, spares or repairs in Staffordshire? Visit http://back2bikes.org.uk/

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,290

    Default

    Possibly the fridge is turned up too high.

    Or possibly it is an old inefficient model.

    They fitted a new compressor before I bought my boat - I don't think it was the latest and greatest but it was at least new. I've a battery monitor so I can keep a close eye on what it draws. It's 3A about 50% of the time. So approx. 36Ah over 24 hours.

    I find the secret is to fill the fridge with beer. The more air you have in there the more heat you let in everytime you open it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    2,057

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Searush View Post
    Turn the bloody fridge off overnight, you aren't using it while asleep.
    ""With my fridge its only on full when on mains or motoring, on very low during the day and off overnight.""

    Thats what I said..............
    .

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Essex Mud and Solent
    Posts
    3,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Searush View Post
    Turn the bloody fridge off overnight, you aren't using it while asleep.
    That might be OK if it is only used for beer, but if there is food in there as well the fridge will almost certainly get above safe storage temperatures if left off overnight. Care is needed with this approach although it is well worth considering.

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