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Thread: wire to dynema

  1. #1
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    Default wire to dynema

    currently my halyards are wire spliced into polyester - 12mm - and led back through clutches. I'm thinking of changing to all dynema or some other high strength rope and thinking of a smaller diameter , say 10mm, for a variety of reasons.

    anybody done this? did the clutches work OK on what seems like fairly slippy rope? what about handling? splicing?

  2. #2
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    Someone, perhaps not you, asked a question very similar to this before, couple of weeks ago?
    My 12 mm. dyneema main halyard will slip if the cunningham is on hard, its predecessor 12mm. softish polyester braid tail on wire did not, takes the winch to hold it. Newish Spinlock jammers.
    Its only a problem if we are racing.
    Last edited by Quandary; 04-05-11 at 16:57.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosun Higgs View Post
    currently my halyards are wire spliced into polyester - 12mm - and led back through clutches. I'm thinking of changing to all dynema or some other high strength rope and thinking of a smaller diameter , say 10mm, for a variety of reasons.

    anybody done this? did the clutches work OK on what seems like fairly slippy rope? what about handling? splicing?

    I just swapped 12mm for 12mm, got a good deal on Ebay that was cheaper than 10mm dyneema.

    You could also look at cruising dyneema which has a less slippy outer, so it can be used in the clutches. But it also depends on the specifications of your rope clutches. If the are 14-12mm you'll be very lucky if you get away with 10mm, but if they are 10-12mm you might have more success.

    Splicing dyneema is a tough job, it's much easier to do a fishermans knot (or bend, I can never remeber which is which) but this is the fella:


    If you can winch it tight it should be as strong as a splice.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosun Higgs View Post
    currently my halyards are wire spliced into polyester - 12mm - and led back through clutches. I'm thinking of changing to all dynema or some other high strength rope and thinking of a smaller diameter , say 10mm, for a variety of reasons.

    anybody done this? did the clutches work OK on what seems like fairly slippy rope? what about handling? splicing?
    Why on earth use part wire, why not ditch the lot in favour of all Dyneema. We had 12mm Dyneema on our main halyard in our Spinlock clutches, one size down from the previous 14mm main halyard braided and it was fine.
    Sermons from my pulpit are with tongue firmly in cheek and without any warranty!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robin View Post
    Why on earth use part wire, why not ditch the lot in favour of all Dyneema.
    That's exactly what the OP was going to do.......here's the clue "I'm thinking of changing to all dynema"
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    Quote Originally Posted by snooks View Post
    That's exactly what the OP was going to do.......here's the clue "I'm thinking of changing to all dynema"
    OOPS! It is a tad ambiguous though, being headed 'wire to Dynema' and then reading 'wire spliced to polyester' in the main. I just read it wrongly!
    Sermons from my pulpit are with tongue firmly in cheek and without any warranty!

  7. #7
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    I shouldn't imagine you'll have a problem with 10mm dyneema. 12mm dyneema sounds like overkill.

    It's normal to leave the halyards on the winches when beating anyway (when racing). The other trick to minimise the slippage when a line is cranked up hard is to open and close the clutch before taking it off the winch.

    The thing that would concern me most about your proposed change would be the state of the sheeves at the top of the mast and whether they would eat through your new line in revenge for having suffered years of abuse from your wire.

  8. #8
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    I went from 12mm spliced to wire to 10mm dyneema for main and genoa halyards. I've had some complain that 10mm is too thin to handle, but I find it just fine, and have no trouble with tension. Mine are always on wniches attached to the mast though, so not sure how clutches would handle them. I wouldn't dream of trying to splice the stuff, I just use buntline hitches which seem to work fine.

  9. #9
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    When we decided togive up racing and just go cruising in our old Sigma 38 we put the wire/polyester composite halyards away and bought some 12mm prestretched good quality polyester braid. It was cheap because it was purple, about 1/4 the price of dyneema and an awful lot more pleasant to handle, and held well in the clutches. After use for a couple of weeks use I found that stretch was no longer a problem, if you were beating hard you might have to put a tweak on the genny halyard but most of the time the remaining stretch was not even noticeable. We even went racing at West Highland Week with these 'unsuitable' halyards and managed fourth in class in a boat not favoured by light weather.

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    Check with your chandler or rope supplier. You will find that there is a braid covered dyneema specifically for clutch/jammer use.

    You need not be afraid of splicing. It is Very easy. (Old 3-ply was easy, braid is difficult, special ropes are often hellish, dyneema is the quickest and the easiest.) Just follow the instructions, and embed 5 or even 7 inches back up inside the standing part, taper the end.
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