Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    11,847

    Default Converting winches to self-tailing

    My latest boat has two Barient 26 and two Barient 22 sheet winches. All four are two-speed but they are 'standard'. At present they are removed and, after removing all the accumulated crud while servicing them, I realised that the gearing and the bearings are still in an excellent condition with no signs of wear. I understand that it is possible to convert them to self-tailing. I am tempted because replacement would be quite expensive; I believe that the equivalent to the Barient 26 would be a 40 or 44 in modern terms . Has anybody here taken that path?

    As always, very grateful for any opinions / experiences / good or bad.

    TIA.
    Should we paint what is on a face, what is inside it, or what is behind it?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,212

    Default

    You can use a 'Wincher' which is a sort of rubber device that can be fitted on non-self tailers. They are claimed to act a self tailers but I haven't used one so I can't verify the claims. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udk5mY5QJQc another possibilty is these http://winchmate.com/#
    Last edited by ghostlymoron; 01-01-12 at 19:38.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostlymoron View Post
    You can use a 'Wincher' which is a sort of rubber device that can be fitted on non-self tailers. They are claimed to act a self tailers but I haven't used one so I can't verify the claims. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udk5mY5QJQc
    Got them fitted to primary winches and they work a treat . They were on the boat when purchased and didn't look new then so they are some years old and working fine .

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,071

    Default Ditto: Wincher

    I fitted these to my previous boat (Southerly 95) many years ago. They worked very well and were left in place all year round. I worried about UV degradation but that never seemed to be a problem (though I did cover them in winter). I can't remember when they were fitted but think that they were at least 6 years old when I sold the boat.

    Before I bought them I seem to remember some people saying that they didn't work. Enough voted in favour to make them worth trying (& I got a discount when buying).

    It was pre-YouTube days so when they arrived I assumed that the rope fitted into the groove on top in same way as normal self-tailing gear. Didn't take long to work out that they just go around the winch as normal with enough turns to press against the underside of the Wincher.

    I suppose it would have helped to at least open the instructions.
    Last edited by Mistroma; 01-01-12 at 19:57. Reason: Typo

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    11,847

    Default

    Are these Winchers man enough for a 35m^2 Genoa in a stiff wind? I was thinking more in terms of an all-metal conversion such as is advertised by an Australian company, Arco Hutton Winches, whose products appear to have taken over where Barient / Barlow left off.
    Should we paint what is on a face, what is inside it, or what is behind it?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mistroma View Post
    I fitted these to my previous boat (Southerly 95) many years ago. They worked very well and were left in place all year round. I worried about UV degradation but that never seemed to be a problem (though I did cover them in winter). I can't remember when they were fitted but think that they were at least 6 years old when I sold the boat.

    Before I bought them I seem to remember some people saying that they didn't work. Enough voted in favour to make them worth trying (& I got a discount when buying).

    It.

    I suppose it would have helped to at least open the instructions.

    was pre-YouTube days so when they arrived I assumed that the rope fitted into the groove on top in same way as normal self-tailing gear. Didn't take long to work out that they just go around the winch as normal with enough turns to press against the underside of the Wincher
    I did the same .

    Question ----- what is the groove around the top for ??

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PuffTheMagicDragon View Post
    Are these Winchers man enough for a 35m^2 Genoa in a stiff wind? I was thinking more in terms of an all-metal conversion such as is advertised by an Australian company, Arco Hutton Winches, whose products appear to have taken over where Barient / Barlow left off.
    No problem what so ever . Never had any problem winching the genny in in a stiff wind and thats on a 12ton sloop

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,071

    Default The Wincher

    Not certain about that, best to check wrt your winch size.

    My genoa was around 28-30m2 and sheets never slipped on winch. I did worry about them slipping initially but got used to using them.

    They aren't as good as proper self-tailing winches but I only paid a fraction of the cost (around 30 if I remember). So they were a good buy.

    I think that they will probably slip in gusts with changes in wind direction. i.e. Load comes off and then back on suddenly. Didn't happen to me but that might be down to fact that I usually cleated off the tail when finished trimming.

    So fine in light steady breeze but need to cleat off tail in stronger winds. However, the self-tailing action does work and makes things much easier.

    The only other option I had at the time was to buy new self-tailing winches and price difference made it worth risking a trial.

    I imagine that any manufacturer's conversion kit would be very expensive by comparison.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,071

    Default Groove

    Quote Originally Posted by clyst View Post
    I did the same .

    Question ----- what is the groove around the top for ??
    Once I realised that the groove wasn't designed to take the rope I looked at the unit in use. Nothing really obvious happens to give any clue. So I just made the sheet off on an adjacent cleat.

    On further checking, I found that you were actually supposed to jam the sheet into the groove to cleat it. Never did that as my existing cleat was easier to use.

    A proper self-tailer peels the rope out as you sheet in. The wincher doesn't have any static (i.e. non-rotating) mechanism to peel the rope. So you just put turns on the drum and wind it in before cleating (top of wincher or nearby cleat).

    I usually left the rope cleated when sheeting in further and took out the slack on the cleat when I'd finished. I suspect that wouldn't work if it was cleated on top of the drum (due to it twisting around in use).

    Hope that this helps.

  10. #10
    maxi77's Avatar
    maxi77 is offline Registered User
    Location : Kingdom of Fife
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    5,502

    Default

    There is no doubt that 'winchers' make singlehanded winching with non selftailers much much easier. I have them on 6 of my 7 winches and have been delighted with them. Yes winching is still a two handed operation but only the grinding bit needs muscle which makes in my opinion a very big difference. I also find that even on the sheet winches on a 36 footer they hold jus fine without any back up cleating.
    Peter

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •