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  1. #1
    ukmctc's Avatar
    ukmctc is offline Registered User
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    Default What is the ideal boat for a first time sailer

    I had a Hunter 701, basic but friendly and we even lived aboard it for 5-6 months, my favourite and most friendly little boat was a Trapper 500 and this little diamond I would recommend for anyone who has never sailed.

    What would you recommend?

  2. #2
    Seajet's Avatar
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    As long as the novice is reasonably fit and healthy, a sailing dinghy and go out with an experienced bod a few times.

  3. #3
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    Wayfarer. Stable, fun for the family, strong class, good racing and great fun.
    Things can only get better

  4. #4
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    Wayfarers weigh the same as a small planet ( 420lbs I think ); so require plenty of helpers if getting the thing up a slippery slipway; the capsize behaviour is surprisingly bad for a training boat too, can be a pig to right.

    A smaller version like a Wanderer or Leader might be more self sufficient; depending on crew complement a Miracle is relatively light, versatile & cheap.

  5. #5
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    Apart from dinghies then I'd say small, cheap, pre-bashed, and with a double vee berth for you and partner. The berth is probably the most important feature if you are auditioning for the sailing partner you want to share the dream with, so you don't have to give it all up a few years later when "It's hardly a priority for us this year!"

    Anything else from more size, comfort, elegance or performance can wait for boat number 2 when you have found what kind of sailing you really like and with who.

  6. #6
    Minn's Avatar
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    Anything small, simple and cheap - certainly not much over 22ft.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    Wayfarers weigh the same as a small planet ( 420lbs I think ); so require plenty of helpers if getting the thing up a slippery slipway; the capsize behaviour is surprisingly bad for a training boat too, can be a pig to right.

    A smaller version like a Wanderer or Leader might be more self sufficient; depending on crew complement a Miracle is relatively light, versatile & cheap.
    Nah, wimps. Sailed wayfarers for most of my teenage years from 16 onwards. Capsize, just takes practice, two can pull it up a slip if on a launch trolley. And the big plus you can stand on the side without it tipping over.

    Hey ho, take a long look at all the options, get down to your local sailing club or the one you think you'll want to join, see what they're sailing and do some crewing, you'll figure out what's best for you

    Whichever boat you choose, you'll have a great time.
    Things can only get better

  8. #8
    Seajet's Avatar
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    I always thought the Wayfarer sailors were the wimps; I prefer demanding performance boats like Ospreys, International 14's, Fireball's and the rest; plenty of capsize experience, and since 1970 have seen plenty of Wayfarers struggle both to right after capsize and getting up a slipway, where I usually was one of the helpers.

  9. #9
    Minn's Avatar
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    I can still singlehand my son's Firefly, and getting her up the ramp is a doddle...

    She's also a fun boat to sail - roll tacking up through moorings is just as much fun as a screaming spinnaker reach (imho!)

  10. #10
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    What is the ideal new sailor? They (boats) are all a compromise and everyone has different priorities.

    Rupert and Minn have it about right, something with the newness worn off, not too big and probably a popular model that will be easy to sell when your needs/ideas/priorities change.

    Of course the best answer is the type of boat I started in because I did it the best way and that's obviously the only way.
    Bob.
    Any bull in this post may be composted.

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