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  1. #401
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    So far, the most reliable technique I have found for dealing with bow windage is to use my 25lb lead 'drudging' weight. Just let it go over the bow when the boat is in midstream, wait a few moments while she settles head to wind and then motor slowly ahead, recovering the weight as you go.

    Whilst waiting for the boat to settle head to wind, there is time to light the pipe that John Morris probably assumes us old fuddy-duddy long-keelers smoke.
    'The lyf so short
    the arte so long to lerne.'

  2. #402
    Barnac1e's Avatar
    Barnac1e is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by flaming View Post
    There is a school of thought that it's the keel that trips the boat up and rolls it, and so with a raised keel the boat will just slide sideways.
    I can vouch for that. During a race from Whitby once, going north in the bay towards Sandsend, for those that know the area, I went well inshore to get out from the strong, south-going tide, which I thought I could do with my centre-plate up in the beam wind and which the usual bunch of competitors couldn't safely do with their larger, fin-keel yachts.

    All went well despite a heavy swell that was taking the light wind out of the sails sometimes until we came to Upgang Rock, a submarine uprising over which we would have plenty of clearance. However, out of nowhere the swell broke (with no previous indication of breakers there) and the boat started surfing sideways at an alarming rate. Eventually, in shallower water the wave subsided and, with still enough water to sail off, I cleared the shore, quite shaken.

    If I had had the plate down, or a keel boat, I think I would have been rolled with the height of the wave. As it was, I obtained the title of 'Beachcomber' in the clubhouse later.

  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by parsifal View Post
    So far, the most reliable technique I have found for dealing with bow windage is to use my 25lb lead 'drudging' weight. Just let it go over the bow when the boat is in midstream, wait a few moments while she settles head to wind and then motor slowly ahead, recovering the weight as you go.
    Bet you have "baggywrinkle" on your rigging and maybe thole pins and hemp rope and stockholm tar on your gansey and walk with a sailors roll as you head for the Shipwrights Arms. . Beard?

  4. #404
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    So much to learn. ( tempting to make a snide comment about boat handling learning or spending on paper tickets) but.

    Parsifals drudging idea I have never tried though v tempting to deploy the anchor from the cockpit if one is so set up, enough to bump vertically along the seabed and assist in backing out. I guess you would have to know that the ground is flattish and not obstructed. One more trick to try.

    MichaelChapman I raced on a smack the Ellen which had one diesel and two saildrives hydraulically driven- impressive, especially to the unsuspecting in close quarters.

    LongKeeler the idea of stowing the sweep handily along the backstay-perfect. That would be well supported to withstand the reverse steering forces. This I have to try. Ironically one assumes it is better to raise a self steering paddle for closequarters manoeuvrability but hmmm..some swing out and then align fore and aft but if the turning moment could be kept active, that might be enough in itself.
    March is perfect marina parking practise time midweek, lots of empty pontoons and no traffic or bored watching AWB observers?
    Last edited by Blueboatman; 07-03-12 at 09:31.
    Why argue with a nautical wall? I just read the graffiti these days.

  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosun Higgs View Post
    Bet you have "baggywrinkle" on your rigging and maybe thole pins and hemp rope and stockholm tar on your gansey and walk with a sailors roll as you head for the Shipwrights Arms. . Beard?
    All of that except that I wouldn't be seen dead in a beard! I cannot imagine why on earth anyone would countenance one.
    'The lyf so short
    the arte so long to lerne.'

  6. #406
    Robin's Avatar
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    Well after all the arguments about the benefits of long keels on here the pro camp have probably scuppered more long keel hopefuls by their tales of handling tricks and treats than any logical case for better performance ever could.
    Sermons from my pulpit are with tongue firmly in cheek and without any warranty!

  7. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueboatman View Post

    Parsifals drudging idea I have never tried though v tempting to deploy the anchor from the cockpit if one is so set up, enough to bump vertically along the seabed and assist in backing out. I guess you would have to know that the ground is flattish and not obstructed. One more trick to try.
    The idea is not to help you back out, it is to hold the bow facing the wind temporarily so you can then motor out ahead.

    In practice I lead the line from the cockpit via a snatch-block to a bow fairlead, then back aft 'outside all', and prop the weight on the toerail by the cockpit where it can be easily pushed off into the water. Recovery can then be done from the cockpit and the weight lifted on board when in open water.

    There is little chance of snagging the weight on anything because it is only a 2" square section of lead window sash. That's why I use a weight and not an anchor, although an anchor could be used if the line was attached to its crown.

    As John Goode, from whom I got the idea, points out, marinas are not dredged any deeper than the minimum necessary because dredging costs money so you are not having to haul in long lines
    'The lyf so short
    the arte so long to lerne.'

  8. #408
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    Scotty_Tradewind is offline Registered User
    Location : Me: South Oxfordshire. Boat: Portsmouth harbour, Wicormarine
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    In my Twister I tried the technique of pointing her tail into the wind and yes, into a reasonable breeze or strong wind it does work.

    My Tradewind, an even heavier displacement long keeler, seems to do the same and going astern some distance it's dead simple to steer, I simply give a blast on the bow thruster!
    You never get to where you want to go if you only travel on sunny days.

  9. #409
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    Re MoboRobin of Poole(. Just wait till you get a norther blowing through some overcrowded Banamas anchorage and those tophampered mobos start dancing and dragging...
    'Welcome to my world' for grown up boat handling! Of course the 'Bale-out-to-sea' option that we long keelers love, may not look so attractive then.
    (Tongue in cheek).
    Don't know about you but I am taking on board some genuine tips that may be useful to any boat owner of whatever type, having like you owned more than one boat type.
    Last edited by Blueboatman; 07-03-12 at 10:55.
    Why argue with a nautical wall? I just read the graffiti these days.

  10. #410
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueboatman View Post
    Re MoboRobin of Poole(. Just wait till you get a norther blowing through some overcrowded Banamas anchorage and those tophampered mobos start dancing and dragging...
    'Welcome to my world' for grown up boat handling! Of course the 'Bale-out-to-sea' option that we long keelers love, may not look so attractive then.
    (Tongue in cheek).
    Don't know about you but I am taking on board some genuine tips that may be useful to any boat owner of whatever type, having like you owned more than one boat type.


    I don't want to kick off a new anchor thread but we are planning on a) upping our 66lb Claw to a 88lb Delta b) picking less crowded anchorages where possible (I heard the septics anchor like the French) c) Getting out of dodge quick if needed since we can wind up to 17kts if needed!
    Sermons from my pulpit are with tongue firmly in cheek and without any warranty!

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