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  1. #21
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    I've not tried it, what's HCl like on through hulls/seacocks? A bit splashed on the outside should show if it dissolves the metal, it'll clean it up and make it shine for a while.

    I'm a bucket chemist and fairly gung ho but I wouldn't be leaving anything soaking while I was away. Yes, use HCl to dissolve the limescale while you are there to watch it fizzing (producing CO2), but flush it out well before you leave the boat.

    You will get chlorine if you get acid on bleach, don't mix your cleaning materials.
    Bob.
    Any bull in this post may be composted.

  2. #22
    BlueSkyNick is offline Registered User
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    Steve, based on personal experience on the last boat, it depends on two things - cash and time available. My recommended option, bearing in mind the hugh usage your heads are getting, would be to rip out the pipe and replace it rather than muck about with chemicals etc.

    Second option would be to take out the pipe, shift as much **** out as possible by banging and poking, bung up one end then fill it with brick cleaner for a while.

    The effort of taking the pipe out is worth it to do a proper job, compared to trying to clear it in situ.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoodyNick View Post
    Steve, based on personal experience on the last boat, it depends on two things - cash and time available.
    Morning Nick;
    cash? limited; spent about 18 so far on cleaner, rods.
    time? well, it get's me out of bed!!

    My recommended option, bearing in mind the huge usage your heads are getting, would be to rip out the pipe and replace it rather than muck about with chemicals etc.,,,,,,, The effort of taking the pipe out is worth it to do a proper job, compared to trying to clear it in situ.
    I think I'm tending to agree re replacement. The calcium coming out (using brick cleaner) is like 10p size lumps; maybe 3-4mm thick. It's like tree rings; sandy, dark, sandy; so that's UK, Spain, UK; and there's more to come out!

    Second option would be to take out the pipe, shift as much **** out as possible by banging and poking, bung up one end then fill it with brick cleaner for a while.
    I'll fit new rather than mess about with it; problem with getting it out is that because of the build process (charter spec) the loop is much higher than standard and looks very difficult to get at and remove (could be mini hack-saw job)!

    I've done it once before, fitted new; not Seraph - Moondance

    Anyway now time to try more Hcl and maybe then a visit to Force 4.

  4. #24
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    You could always use citric acid - maybe takes some of the guesswork out of how sealants at joints will stand up to very low pH.

    Do not be tempted to use sulphuric acid - after an initiall fizz it will stop due to a coating of calcium sulphate being built up around the substrate....which is insoluble, thus preventing further reaction.

  5. #25
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    well, bit the bullet and decided to rip out the pipe and replace.
    This was state of the pipe:



    and another slice:


    Now I need some help: the outgoing pipe is 40mm; so I'd like to replace with similar - but I can't find any - even trying Lee Sanitation and it's a no.

    I guess I could heat fit the standard 38mm - if push comes to shove.

    And a word regarding Jeanneau/Sea Ventures - no syphon relief fitted!!!!!!; and given the heads vis waterline and heal potential then it should have one fitted; so possibly another reason for trying 38mm pipe.

    So anyone out there know of a source of low-odour 40mm flexi-pipe????

  6. #26
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    I think you may find your pipe is 38mm and not 40mm, its normal to heat up to get it soft enough to push onto the connection.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksutton View Post
    I think you may find your pipe is 38mm and not 40mm, its normal to heat up to get it soft enough to push onto the connection.
    'fraid not. It's got 40mm stamped on it and when aligned up against 38mm pipe it is bigger.

    Offer a clean bit of the pipe upto a 38mm anti-syphon thingy and it's way too big.

    There is also a ref number; if it helps: 00551811021828L-1414

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Clayton View Post
    'fraid not. It's got 40mm stamped on it and when aligned up against 38mm pipe it is bigger.

    Offer a clean bit of the pipe upto a 38mm anti-syphon thingy and it's way too big.

    There is also a ref number; if it helps: 00551811021828L-1414


    Seems this has been discussed on here before, go to this thread.


    http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread.php?t=151754

  9. #29
    jimbaerselman's Avatar
    jimbaerselman is online now Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelmercier View Post
    That smell is hydrogen sulphide, produced by anaerobic bacteria in the intake. I've fitted a Jabsco filter into the intake pipes, and dose every few months with a Milton tablet.
    Milton is, I believe, just very dilute (and very expensive) bleach, sodium hypochlorite.

    Yes, hypochlorite is good at killing bacteria, being a strong oxidant. This also makes it corrosive to quite a wide range of seal materials (rubbers, neoprenes). I'm sure VicS could find a list of seal materials and their sensitivity to corrosive agents.

    Best not to use it internally in loos. But great for an external wipe around to remove ammonia type smells - and bad egg smells. We all miss from time to time . . .
    JimB
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  10. #30
    electrosys is offline Registered User
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    Well - judging by those photographs, I think any discussion of dissolving that lot by chemical means is academic - you'd have needed to have used buckets of the stuff to shift that lot.

    I wonder - is there sufficient room to install a suitable T-piece with a removable cap along with the new pipework to allow rodding access in the case of a repeat performance ? I'm a great believer in physical brute force with a high-pressure hose behind it (shades of Dyno-Rod ...).
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