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  1. #1
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    Default Hammerhead in French

    Does anyone know the French for Hammerhead....pontoon that is, not shark!

    We've scanned all the usual suspects for a translation but nowhere can we find out what the French call a 'hammerhead' mooring. Oh and while I'm on the topic, the Spanish equivalent would be useful too.

    Merci.

  2. #2
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    Do you mean a mooring cleat?

    If this is the case, it's called a "Taquet d'amarrage" or "Taquet de tournage".

    [EDIT] Ok, did a quick google to see what was a hammerhead pontoon, and I would go for "ponton en T" (pronounce Té, not Tee) or "Embarcadere (a passagers)" [/EDIT]
    Last edited by LePacha; 28-02-12 at 14:25.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    —William A. Ward

  3. #3
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    No - the Hammer head is the berth at the end of a pontoon of fingers ...

    take the letter F - the middle cross piece is a finger - outside the cross piece at the top is what we call the hammerhead - similar to a T - the berth that would be on the top end of this is also the hammerhead. Often used because its easier to get on to and can take longer vessels than the fingers berths down the side.

  4. #4
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    Default Hammerhead pontoon

    William,

    Thanks for that but no not a mooring cleat. It's the name commonly used to describe the mooring at the end of a pontoon. It sits at right angles to the pontoon and provides a useful mooring for longer boats or ones which have a larger than usual beam.

    Maybe there's no direct French description but if there is it would be jolly useful to know what it is.

    A bientot.

  5. #5
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    Default No idea ... ... ...

    ... ... ... but I bet Kathy Parsons does http://www.frenchforcruisers.com/ffc-kparsons.htm

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yacht Breeze View Post
    Does anyone know the French for Hammerhead....pontoon that is, not shark!

    We've scanned all the usual suspects for a translation but nowhere can we find out what the French call a 'hammerhead' mooring. Oh and while I'm on the topic, the Spanish equivalent would be useful too.

    Merci.
    Not sure. Try "Au but de ponton." That is how I have been directed to a berth at the end of a pontoon.

    In Spanish, I do not know but it is less necessary. In many Spanish marinas a marinero will meet you. I always suggest calling them on VHF - in rudimentary Spanish preferably if you are not fluent. You will probably not get a reply but they will know that you are coming. Maybe not necessary but polite to do so. The SpaniSh are a polite people so do not forget the por favor and gratias.
    Last edited by franksingleton; 28-02-12 at 16:03.

  7. #7
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    Default Franglais

    How about 'tete de marteau'?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yacht Breeze View Post
    Does anyone know the French for Hammerhead....pontoon that is, not shark!

    We've scanned all the usual suspects for a translation but nowhere can we find out what the French call a 'hammerhead' mooring. Oh and while I'm on the topic, the Spanish equivalent would be useful too.

    Merci.
    normally its the "short finger" i get
    I may be wrong but not always

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by franksingleton View Post
    Try "Au bOut dU ponton." .
    Not sure if there is a real word to be honest, but yep, I would go for the above suggestion, or "ponton en T" or "embarcadere".

    And btw, my name's not William, but you're welcome!
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    —William A. Ward

  10. #10
    Roberto's Avatar
    Roberto is online now Registered User
    Location : Lorient, back home after a 3yr Atlantic circuit
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireball View Post
    what we call the hammerhead - similar to a T - the berth that would be on the top end of this is also the hammerhead. Often used because its easier to get on to and can take longer vessels than the fingers berths down the side.

    In Spanish is called "el te", like the letter, "the T"

    I once was directed to "el te del de", I asked to repeat again until they eventually explained: it was the hammerhead berth of the D pontoon.

    That's how I know


    "te" is pronounced like the first two letters of "technique"
    I guess it might be useful to know the Spanish alphabet spelling
    Last edited by Roberto; 28-02-12 at 16:04.
    oh no, yet another sailing blog
    http://sybrancaleone.blogspot.com/

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