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Thread: Interior lights

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Default Interior lights

    People may be interested..... I've been looking to reduce my 'lecky requirement - especially the 'internal lighting' component - and I've combined these 3 x AAA battery-powered LED lights ( cost 1/pair ) with bamboo tea-light holders 'reclaimed' from a schools' Scrapstore in Bristol ( cost, a few pence each )





    I reckon these batteries will last a season, are easily replaced, and will reduce the load on stored 12V power rather considerably. Every other incandescent bulb on the boat is being replaced with LED - except the BIG 5-million candlepower handheld searchlight/torch which takes 12V power via a plug.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    346

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    Absolutely brilliant.

    Use Velcro to install them and it's easy to replace the batteries!

    Tony

  3. #3
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    Jan 2012
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    Default

    I also fitted multi-LED replacement festoon bulbs in my interior lights. They were OK at first, but some of the LEDs failed in many of them. In tropical conditions, the interior seemed pretty gloomy, possibly because the light levels in the day were so bright. I had some LED strips sent out and they were a great help, and have proved to be completely reliable. They have also got a lot cheaper eg
    [URL="http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2X24cm-24-white-LED-car-flexible-strip-neon-light-12V-Waterproof-Strip-NEW-/180799596384?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM& hash=item2a187ee760"]

    The battery ones look nice, but I think they may prove to be a little dim unless a lot of them were used. I also have a bit of an aversion to replaceable batteries, as they are a very expensive way to buy a little electricity. Work out the cost per kWh. Certainly LEDs of some description are the way to go. I have solar charging and had no need to run the engine for extra charging.

    Len

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScallywagII View Post
    The battery ones look nice, but I think they may prove to be a little dim unless a lot of them were used. I also have a bit of an aversion to replaceable batteries, as they are a very expensive way to buy a little electricity. Work out the cost per kWh. Certainly LEDs of some description are the way to go. I have solar charging and had no need to run the engine for extra charging.

    Len
    I rather agree, Len. These are a 'cheap 'n cheerful' solution while I fund other, more significant purchases - such as Lopolights.

  5. #5
    Glayva's Avatar
    Glayva is offline Registered User
    Location : Medway, Gillingham Reach
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScallywagII View Post
    I had some LED strips sent out and they were a great help, and have proved to be completely reliable. They have also got a lot cheaper eg
    [URL="http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2X24cm-24-white-LED-car-flexible-strip-neon-light-12V-Waterproof-Strip-NEW-/180799596384?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM& hash=item2a187ee760"]
    Len
    What are you doing for a switch? I've looked at these, thinking of putting them between the headlining and bulkhead, but fitting a switch which is probably going to be proud of its surrounds has stymied me.

    I've found there is very little requirement for interior light at night in the ocean. Cook in daylight, go to bed at sunset get up at sunrise - no need for light. But in port if one should go out at night it is nice to come home to some light inside. When my wife visits me in port she seems to think it is important to find her way around the main cabin at night without tripping over all my stores.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glayva View Post
    What are you doing for a switch? I've looked at these, thinking of putting them between the headlining and bulkhead, but fitting a switch which is probably going to be proud of its surrounds has stymied me.

    I've found there is very little requirement for interior light at night in the ocean. Cook in daylight, go to bed at sunset get up at sunrise - no need for light. But in port if one should go out at night it is nice to come home to some light inside. When my wife visits me in port she seems to think it is important to find her way around the main cabin at night without tripping over all my stores.
    I had festoon light fittings with separate switches already in the boat. I first substituted 6,9 and 18 LED festoon replacements, then when that was inadequate fitted one strip in parallel with each light. I also put one each side of the companionway, wired to a spare switch on the switch panel. Downside of that arrangement was that I could see to do the washing up.

    I left Canaries in November and Cape Verde in December, 13+ hours of night so some cabin lighting was pretty useful, though for JC the situation is different. I noticed the lack of light much more as the nights got longer.

    Len

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldbilbo View Post
    I rather agree, Len. These are a 'cheap 'n cheerful' solution while I fund other, more significant purchases - such as Lopolights.
    Have a look at some previous Lopolight threads before buying. I may be unlucky, but I've had two fail on me and one of them was the recent updated version.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    16

    Default Navigation Lights

    You can also paint these with a transparent red and green and have them as back up navigation lights. Not bad for a quid!
    You can't beat a Coleman lamp for lighting and saving electricity especially nice in the cockpit when you're alone at night.
    Vince

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