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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    128

    Default Iroko, Sapele or Marine Ply?

    Any suggestions on what the pros and cons are of using the above woods to make a hatch (about 745 x 600 in size) for a small sloop.

    This will be made in two pieces each about 745 x 300 although possibly narrower planks glued if using hardwood to avoid the problems of warping. The hatch will of course be well varnished.

    Marine ply I think will be most expensive followed by Iroko and then Sapele...any other suggestions also welcome.

    Thanks in advance.

    p.s I used external ply last time but its not now a pretty sight so I certainly will not be going down that route!
    Thanks for reading

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,469

    Default

    Maybe the framework out of iroko and the top panel/roof from ply. Or are you just doing the panel bit?
    If so, there's the option of cladding a thinner ply base with iroko strips - rebates in the joints to take caulking - for a more upmarket look.
    I did ply with a lick of epoxy, then paint job on mine.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    128

    Default

    Hi thanks for your reply.

    I should have clarified that I am only making the sliding removable hatchway 'doors' not the whole hatch...I am afraid that would be beyond my skills.
    Thanks for reading

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    184

    Default

    Mahogany framed, with 6mm ply panels:

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    128

    Default

    Nice
    Thanks for reading

  6. #6
    northwind is offline Registered User
    Location : Me -Storrington / boat Chichester
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    623

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paella View Post
    Any suggestions on what the pros and cons are of using the above woods to make a hatch (about 745 x 600 in size) for a small sloop.

    This will be made in two pieces each about 745 x 300 although possibly narrower planks glued if using hardwood to avoid the problems of warping. The hatch will of course be well varnished.

    Marine ply I think will be most expensive followed by Iroko and then Sapele...any other suggestions also welcome.

    Thanks in advance.

    p.s I used external ply last time but its not now a pretty sight so I certainly will not be going down that route!
    Avoid iroko, horrible stuff to work with. (it's dust is a carcinogenic)

    A sapele frame with infill of ply is the ideal, solid timber won't be as stable as ply.

  7. #7
    DanBurrill is offline Registered User
    Location : Ludham, Norfolk
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    58

    Default

    Iroko is not particularly pleasant to work with (interlocking grain and particles of silica in the wood that blunt tools), but it's dust is not much more carcinogenic than any other hardwood - they're all a problem (there's a reason nasal cancer is also known as Carpenter's Disease).

    Iroko is particularly good for rot resistance, and considerably cheaper than Teak and easier to obtain than Elm, which are two others with similar properties (both considerably easier to work with).

    Personally, I'd probably go with marine ply, making sure the edges are sealed with two or three coats of a good epoxy to keep out water.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DanBurrill View Post
    Personally, I'd probably go with marine ply, making sure the edges are sealed with two or three coats of a good epoxy to keep out water.
    Yes my inclination too if I was doing it myself. However a friendly local joiners have offered to do the job for me so I could use a hard wood which I thought might be better...
    Thanks for reading

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,575

    Default

    I think you are talking about a set of washboards. I made a set last winter using 12mm marine ply. The vertical sides I trimmed with oak strip and the horizontal sides with a triangular(ish) moulding to give a water run-off where the two boards sit together. Lots of coats of varnish.
    I kept my tacky old boards to put in for the winter when the boat is ashore.

  10. #10
    William_H is offline Registered User
    Location : West Australia
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    8,774

    Default Wash boards

    Bear in mind that your wash boards are your first defence against theft and vandals. The height is just right for someone to kick the boards in. I now have stout aluminium wash boards after ply was smashed. good luck olewill

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