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  1. #1

    Default power boat 42/43"

    Hi everybody,

    I used to be a sailing fanatic but due to some changes i would like to switch to power boat. Here in Med the major part of power boats are stick to their safe and quiet moorings as soon as the wind is blowinf more than 15/20knots... So here is my question, are boat like Princess, Fairline, (i have to admit that i like their designs both ext or interiors) safe and seaworthy when you have to face a gale or at least a 30/35 not wind with 3 meters swell and waves or like they say here it is better to stay hide in your marina ? i have been told by some brokers that princess or fairline as english built boat are expected to face bad weather safely.
    I would highly appreciate your advises and experiences about these kind of boats, because i can't imagine having a boat not able to manage some heavy weather...
    Thanks very much and good boating to everybody.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: power boat 42/43\"

    Simple answer. Yes

    Longer answer,Yes, as long as the skipper isn't a complete twit with no rough weather experience

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  3. #3
    hlb's Avatar
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    Default Re: power boat 42/43\"

    The difference with a power boat as opposed to a yacht is the hull shape. The power boat hull has to rise quickly inorder to go over the waves at 20+ knots, where as a yacht would just nose dive at that speed. So the effect is much more on the crew, bouncing up and down. The boats quite happy to do this because it's like a cork. So the reason most power boats stay tied up in a blow is it's just bloody uncomfortable and theres directional problems if slowed down to much. Having said that. I've been in plenty of **** and never gone less than 8 knots, still doing double the yachts around me.

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  4. #4
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    Default Re: power boat 42/43\"

    Yes it is true that UK built boats tend to have marginally deeper V's than the others but a motorboat can never be as seaworthy as a yacht because they are not self righting although they are seaworthy enough to plough through rough seas if handled correctly.
    You may find the change to a gin palace type boat like Fairline or Princess to be too much of a shock though and your yottie friends will certainly never speak to you again. As an alternative, you could look at boats like Nelsons, Aquastars or Seawards which are extremely seaworthy but less of a culture shock

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    Default Re: power boat 42/43\"

    I agree, the crew are usually uncomfortable long before the boat is struggling. Depending on sea conditions you might find that a speed closer to 14-16kts is more sustainable than 25, in heavy weather. And that could increase your fuel burn so you need to watch your range

    If you're buying, we have one for sale, 42 feet, in the Med (cote d'azur). Berth available to buy too. Has very serious nav gear, proper radar and such like, so ideal for heavy weather! See <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.geocities.com/fairlinephantom42> here </A> and/or PM me (click on the jfm) if you're interested

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    Default Re: power boat 42/43\"

    "So the reason most power boats stay tied up in a blow is it's just bloody uncomfortable and theres directional problems if slowed down to much."

    No it's not!! We can leave when it smoothes out and still beat the "raggies" to the bar ;-))))))

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    Andy M

  7. #7
    tcm is online now Registered User
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    Default sagfe and seaworthy

    In bad weather, the boats are indeed safe and seaworthy. The problem is for the crew. have a look at recent exploits and you'll see that problems arise from opeople getting whacked around inside the boat - far more dangerous and in more benign conditions than when a boat is about to be overcome by the conditions themselves.

    A second point is the speed : with a powrrboat you can "be elsewhere" at speed - we outran an electrical storm recently when less speedy sailing boats were hit. This illustrates the fact that you don't HAVE to face bad weather quite so often as perhaps one might in a sailing boat. With five+ times the speed, you can pick the right hour in which to make a trip, rather than (on a sailing boat) set off now and not be sure what the next 6 hours will bring. Note also that the game is mostly short-term forecasts - maximum likely trip will be 12 hours, most a lot less. Of course, you still have to get back...

    the third point is also related to the speed: the conditions upwind and downwind are more dramtically different than on a sailing boat. Provided that it isn't on the nose, going out in force 7 or 8 is not out of the question, and with a following F7 it's been quite pleasant, with near-still air on the bridge. The tricky bit happens whern you enter a marina at the other end, not easy in winds above 30 knots. Time to bung it on a waiting pontoon or indeed any blimmin pontton and wait for the storm to pass.

    Pitching Princess against Fairline is not easy: often the seaworthines will be the difference between crew, what's in the cupboards to fly about and crash about. That aside, some say that with Princess being made in plymouth, their local conditions are testing and the likely-seafaring shopfloor staff are likely to be more knowledgeable about what will work and what won't than people making boats in the East Midlands, which is relevant. Of course, it doesn't follow that all boats made near the sea are better than all boats not made near the sea. All other things being equal (and those brands are otherwise quite similar) I think it is very relevant.



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    Default Re: sagfe and seaworthy

    Mmmm.....

    So that means that cars built somewhere between Silverstone and the M1, must handle much better than those built near Blackpool [img]/forums/images/icons/wink.gif[/img]





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  9. #9
    tcm is online now Registered User
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    Default logic

    hm, not sure the logic holds that far. Cars are built by robots - boats are handbuilt things. Hence a good deal of control/quality comes from the production workforce.

    My point (as well you know and trying to make me go off at a tangent) was that more of those in Cornywall will likely know boaty stuff, like, erm that if making a 48 foot sports cruiser you need stainless steel staples in your staple gun when making the seats in the cockpit cos the salty waves can go over the lot otherwise it'll go rusty, which mine did, and that windscreens in sports boats have to be able to survive a big greeny which is BIG hence boat#1 of the same model had the sidewindows and windscreen ripped off which forced aftermarket strengtheners. By contrast, hull number 1 or 2 of the prinny V65 was in the water bashing around the eddystone quite soon.

    BUT the same logic follows that being a bit rustic instead of trendily semidetached, cornwally types have not the faintest idea what a decent kitchen/galley looks like, cos presumably they eat pasties for starters and icecream for afters, hence daft gloss wood on the worksurfaces. Whereas galleys in fairlines look a million dollars, i am told. There again, that was one the boats which cost about $1.4million....

    also, the formula one cars are made near silverstone etc, whereas ****e TVR's are near blackpool. So there har har har! Oops, i mean, I rest my case m'lud.

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    Default Re: sagfe and seaworthy

    Didn't know there were any cars built in the UK any more. ;o)

    Though TVRs are built in Blackpool, aren't they? Hmmm, beginning to see what you mean........

    Oops; beaten to it by tcm. Damn, fie, pish and blast etc.
    <hr width=100% size=1><P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by jhr on 25/11/2003 16:25 (server time).</FONT></P>
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