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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    680

    Smile My first British Seagull!

    Hi!

    I've just bought my first British Seagull. It's a 40 plus and I've got to say for 50 quid it's a nice little outboard for the money.



    For some reason that whiff of two stroke, the smoke it just appeals to me! But if it does turn out to be a wrong un then at least I've experienced the Seagull in all its glory and another right of passage to cruiserdom complete. However, if it's a good un then that's 400quid saved straight away.

    Anyway, what I want to know is are there any practical tips other Seagull owners can give (No not the sling it overboard or use as a kedge variety)?

    How to store it? Do you cover the carb intake when mounting on the rail when underway to stop water getting in? etc. etc.

    All input gratefully received!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,817

    Default

    We used to sell a natty blue canvas cover with the Seagull logo on it to cover when hanging on the rail. You may still be able to get them from Sheridan Marine. Definitely part of the uniform!

    Clean fuel and good spark plug are most important. Lie it down with the tank down and the bracket up. Try to keep the head higher than the gearbox as water can run back into the cylinder. Always run it to stop by turning off the fuel so the carb is dry - easier if you have a clutch model. Don't "service" it - only mess about if it does not work. All sorts of information on the Saving Old Seagulls site.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    9,115

    Default peeing on your parade

    I think you now face a massive ethical dilemma

    http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/vid...-of-a-seagull/

    Dylan

  4. #4
    VicS is offline Registered User
    Location : Home: Kent. Boat: Chichester
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    30,916

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    Most of what you need to know at http://www.saving-old-seagulls.co.uk/

    Anything else http://www.saving-old-seagulls.co.uk/phpbb3/index.php

    I used to carry my 40+ in the bottom of my Mirror dinghy. It was never bothered by a bit of water but if clamped on the rail for long passages in bad weather a storm cowl would protect it from water entering the carb air inlet ... also silences the air intake .. not sure if they are still available though.

    A smart Saving-old-Seagulls cover is what you really need. Available from John Williams at S-O-S
    John Williams for practically anything else.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    680

    Default

    I have a cover from previous outboards so I'm ok there. However, the storm cowl is a good idea.

    Will also be mindful of keeping the head higher than the foot too!

    Dylan,
    As for unethical, compared to the **** (literally) pumped into the rivers by corporations around the world, the **** from tankers and other such craft that's ejected and the sheer volume of **** from the plastic bags/bottles that's ended up floating as micro plastic balls in the middle of our oceans the Seagull does nothing in comparison.

    It doesn't mean it's ok but in the schema of things and in the pollution our day to day lives bring to our seas from ashore it's not something I'm going to wring my hands over worrying about. I'd love a new outboard but 500 quid for an outboard is something I just can't afford at this point in time.

    85% of the time I row the tender when it's just me or its the odd trip. However, when its multiple trips backwards and forwards when loading up or lots of visitors to the boat that's when the outboard is unleashed.

    I'll see how it goes but apart from the initial drippy start up routine I didn't see anything else in the water when I tested started it. To counter the drippy start up this is what the MK1 oily rag is for. Hold it under the carb when pumping for the drip and off you go.

    If it's ejecting oil everywhere and it's obviously not right then it'll be binned but from what I saw of my tests it was no worse than my Mariner Two stroke a few years ago (minus the drippy start up).

  6. #6
    VicS is offline Registered User
    Location : Home: Kent. Boat: Chichester
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    30,916

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Haddock View Post
    I have a cover from previous outboards so I'm ok there. However, the storm cowl is a good idea.

    Ebay 370169425129 but I'd not pay that much . 30p in 1974 !

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    222

    Default

    The first thing I would suggest is run it and check it's pumping coolant water out of the block. Not just a dribble, but a good flow. If it's flowing all well and good. If it's not flowing then go to the Saving Old Seagulls site where there is a wealth of practical information. The forum attached to it is excellent, too.

    And John at SoS sells covers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    24,365

    Default

    Many were stored under the D-day beaches before being rescued by French fishemen, so I wouldn't stress too much about treating it well. Bt I do agree that you need to develop the art of turning off the fuel before you arrive so that it just conks out as you arrive. That way it is less likely to dump a carb full of fuel in the cockpit locker or the boot of your car.
    Boaty junk clogging up your shed or lockers? Chuck it in http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marinaskip

    Want a used bike, spares or repairs in Staffordshire? Visit http://back2bikes.org.uk/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3,552

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    I would suggest always make sure you have a spare starter cord available. It is not unkown for them to fly off into the oggin, usually when the engine has just FAILED to start.

    I support the art of switching the fuel off as you approach your destination. It avoids the fuel dribble, but also if the engine is being left for a while the petrol will evaporate leaving a very oily mixture in the jet which will then make starting difficult next time.

    Also make absolutely sure you have done both clamp screws up tight. I once found myself with a running engine which had almost detached itself from the transom, a tricky moment. It happened when I turned the engine to make a sharp turn and the sideways thrust nearly removed the engine.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    810

    Default

    I used to have a Silver Century a few years ago , the one with the big bevels at the base and 'taper actuated clutch'
    It used to propel my 16' dayboat wonderfully.

    However , it was embarrasingly good at emitting blue smoke.

    The main issue I had was the vibration it induced into the boat started to split the joints between the transom and the sides of the boat !, I was horrified when I discovered this after turning round at the lee end of Windermere and putting on a lot of power to get to safety. I thougth the back of the boat was going to peel off.

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