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Thread: Teak Deck

  1. #1
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    Default Teak Deck

    My 34ft sailing boat has a teak deck (bonded fortunately, not screwed), which needs replacing. After removing it, I'm thinking of either painting the deck with non-skid paint or (probably) putting Treadmaster down. I'm looking for some advice:
    a) What is the teak normally stuck down with, is it Sikaflex or similar material?
    b) Rather than remove the stanchions, cleats etc, could I carefully cut / chisel around them, leaving their teak base in place?
    c) Assuming the deck was bonded down with sealant, how can I remove the old sealant (i.e. is there a chemical solvent which I can safely use)?
    d) With my own time being a bit limited, does anyone have any idea how much it would cost to have someone remove the deck for me (e.g. cost per sq mt)? The side deck and foredecks are teak, and also the cockpit seats.
    Any advice greatly appreciated, thanks.

  2. #2
    TQA's Avatar
    TQA is offline Registered User
    Location : Carribbean currently Grenada
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    Make and year would be a help?
    Monkey patching programmer [retired ]

  3. #3
    Twister_Ken's Avatar
    Twister_Ken is offline Registered User
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    Could be almost anything. Is the builder or the dealer still around to ask?

    Don't expect to lift the teak off and find a pristine deck underneath. You just might get lucky, but it seems most people that have done it (me too) manage to damage the deck to an extent in removal, plus the gloop doesn't just peel off either. You'll be left with lots of sanding and making good to do before you start putting it back together. Incidentally, there are some heart-breaking tales about the removal of Treadmaster too, so if you might want to do it again further down the line, I'd try making good and non-slip paint as the easy alternative.
    Next time, it'll all be different.

  4. #4
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    Depends on who the builder is - it could be either a polyurethane adhesive or epoxy, probably vacuum bagged. Whichever it is, it is not intended to come off cleanly, so be prepared for removing it physically by planing/chiselling/grinding - making a lot of mess and noise. Inevitably you will damage the substrate so be prepared to make good with epoxy/glass/fairing before re-finishing. If fittings are bedded on top of the decorative teak, probably best to remove them completely so that you end up with a flat and fair deck.

    Cost to have somebody do it is difficult to estimate - a lot of relatively unskilled labour - the skill is in getting a good finish once it is removed.

    Scotty Tradewind may be along soon as he has just stripped his deck, but paid to have it refinished.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by raro3 View Post
    My 34ft sailing boat has a teak deck (bonded fortunately, not screwed), which needs replacing. After removing it, I'm thinking of either painting the deck with non-skid paint or (probably) putting Treadmaster down. I'm looking for some advice:
    a) What is the teak normally stuck down with, is it Sikaflex or similar material?
    b) Rather than remove the stanchions, cleats etc, could I carefully cut / chisel around them, leaving their teak base in place?
    c) Assuming the deck was bonded down with sealant, how can I remove the old sealant (i.e. is there a chemical solvent which I can safely use)?
    d) With my own time being a bit limited, does anyone have any idea how much it would cost to have someone remove the deck for me (e.g. cost per sq mt)? The side deck and foredecks are teak, and also the cockpit seats.
    Any advice greatly appreciated, thanks.
    How is this job going, or has it stalled??
    I was also wondering what year the boat is as I'm lead to believe that the conceipt of bonding the decks with teak is only a few years old, but I must be wrong, especially if it needs removing already?!?!?
    I'm in the midst of playing with the teak on my coachroof.... argg, blaa, errrrr!!
    To have a boat is not to have problems, but to find solutions..

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by raro3 View Post
    My 34ft sailing boat has a teak deck (bonded fortunately, not screwed), which needs replacing. After removing it, I'm thinking of either painting the deck with non-skid paint or (probably) putting Treadmaster down. I'm looking for some advice:
    a) What is the teak normally stuck down with, is it Sikaflex or similar material?
    b) Rather than remove the stanchions, cleats etc, could I carefully cut / chisel around them, leaving their teak base in place?
    c) Assuming the deck was bonded down with sealant, how can I remove the old sealant (i.e. is there a chemical solvent which I can safely use)?
    d) With my own time being a bit limited, does anyone have any idea how much it would cost to have someone remove the deck for me (e.g. cost per sq mt)? The side deck and foredecks are teak, and also the cockpit seats.
    Any advice greatly appreciated, thanks.
    FWIW in this month's "Voiles et Voiliers" there is a comparative test of 10 non-slip deck paints. They analyse cost, ease of application, comfort under foot, etc. Without going into more detail the end result was :

    Nautix Grip for its exceptional adherence.
    Kiwi Grip for the simplicity of application.
    Boero Antiskid : to dose the grip.
    International Interdeck - most comfortable.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sybarite View Post
    FWIW in this month's "Voiles et Voiliers" there is a comparative test of 10 non-slip deck paints. They analyse cost, ease of application, comfort under foot, etc. Without going into more detail the end result was :

    Nautix Grip for its exceptional adherence.
    Kiwi Grip for the simplicity of application.
    Boero Antiskid : to dose the grip.
    International Interdeck - most comfortable.
    Surprise!

    "Voiles et Voiliers" does it again.

    It's a French product at No1.

    Just like the Kobra2 was the best anchor.

    Not saying there's anying wrong with either product (I have a Kobra2 as a back-up) but I do wonder about their 'impartiality'.

  8. #8
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    Sep 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradewinds View Post
    Surprise!

    "Voiles et Voiliers" does it again.

    It's a French product at No1.

    Just like the Kobra2 was the best anchor.

    Not saying there's anying wrong with either product (I have a Kobra2 as a back-up) but I do wonder about their 'impartiality'.
    All these 'tests' are best taken with a pinch of salt.
    Look back over the years and try finding a YBW electronics test where Raymarine didn't come out top.
    www.guapa.pn
    Be realistic - aim for the impossible!

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