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  1. #11
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    I always struggle. When I had MOBO's I met some rather umpy 'Raggies'.. When I became a 'Raggie' I then met some umpy MOBO owners and oddly some Dinghy sailors didn't like me either.

    It's tough being in the right club sometimes.

    However, I have met some extremely helpful members of 'all clubs' at all times so hey-ho, in simple form, Some people are nice, Some aren't ..

  2. #12
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    Will say we have met several mobo crews and invariably found them friendly. In Gijon we met a lovely couple on a beautiful Nelson motorboat (It may have helped as we were the only visiting bots there). There were others, including one couple who invited us on to their motorboat, complete with dishwasher, air conditioning and bath!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordanbasset View Post
    Will say we have met several mobo crews and invariably found them friendly. In Gijon we met a lovely couple on a beautiful Nelson motorboat (It may have helped as we were the only visiting bots there). There were others, including one couple who invited us on to their motorboat, complete with dishwasher, air conditioning and bath!
    I don't doubt that in all camps, The extremely friendly far outweigh the grumps!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nostrodamus View Post
    Have you ever come across another boat that does just not want to say hello or people you think are really suspicious?
    Yes, but life it too short to worry about them
    Cynical Scots engineer who sails a Mirage 28

  5. #15
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    Dec 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nostrodamus View Post
    Now don't get me wrong because we have found that up to now every boat we have met with Irish people aboard have been the life and soul of the party and you couldn't meet a friendlier people... up to now.

    When you are the only people on a visitors pontoon in a foreign country and another boat comes in that speaks a similar sort of language you tend to say hello.

    Now if that boat contains four Irish males you expect a can of Guinness to be thrust at you before even a word is uttered.
    Not on this occasion. They are the unfriendliest sailors we have met. In fact we have decided they are either all priests or terrorists. I suppose we could find out by sending our son round with a loud ticking clock. Either he or the clock should grab their attention.

    In the time we have been sailing we have always found that other sailors have always been friendly like you have known them forever.

    Have you ever come across another boat that does just not want to say hello or people you think are really suspicious?
    A rather nice red-ensigned boat was coming to berth beside me. I got on to the catway to receive a line and was told curtly not to touch it. A woman hopped off the boat and made a bit of a pig's ear of it.

  6. #16
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    Dec 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fire99 View Post
    I always struggle. When I had MOBO's I met some rather umpy 'Raggies'.. When I became a 'Raggie' I then met some umpy MOBO owners and oddly some Dinghy sailors didn't like me either.

    It's tough being in the right club sometimes.

    However, I have met some extremely helpful members of 'all clubs' at all times so hey-ho, in simple form, Some people are nice, Some aren't ..

    Years ago I had chartered an Espace 1000 and I was sitting in the cockpit when a rather poorly dressed Italian couple stopped to look at the boat. Thinking it might please them to have a look, I invited them on board and they made the suitable appreciative comments.

    Upon leaving the man turned round and said, "Would you like to join us for a drink on ours?"

    Wow! 65-70' modern sloop with a large white leather seated salon that was all of 15-20' long.....!

    Shouldn't make hasty judgements.

  7. #17
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    Oct 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sybarite View Post

    Shouldn't make hasty judgements.
    Absolutely.. I think we're all guilty of assumptions but it's a good lesson.

  8. #18
    Viking is offline Registered User
    Location : Ålesund, Norway.
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    Red face

    On a Bank holiday weekend many years ago I arrived late on Poole Quay and asked if I could raft up along side a large yacht with a large 'winged bird' motif on it side. The crew, on deck side it was OK only moments later the skipper appeared from below deck with a sour look saying that they would be leave at 03.00 to cross to France and not at all happy. I said that would be OK and we would happily move at that hour. Of course they didnt leave until 09.30 with the skipper still keeping the disappoving face.

    That winter, I arrived at a local RAF station to do a RYA theory course. To be greeted by the same 'sour faced' skipper, who turned out to be a RAF Squadron leader. He did look at me, after a while and asked if he knew me from somewhere. But I put it down to the fact that we sailed in the same area and left it at that!!

  9. #19
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    May 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sybarite View Post
    Shouldn't make hasty judgements.
    But of course we all do. Mostly it's the assumption that the other party will be unfriendly. The triggers are obvious enough. 'I won't talk to that bloke with the blue ensign because he obviously thinks he's better than us' or 'The owner of that great big boat won't want to know us in our little boat'.

    I read of a group of liveaboards in an anchorage getting together for a beach party. One of them thought he should do the decent thing so rowed over to the one superyacht and invited them over, expecting a snobbish rebuff and was surprised to find the owner was delighted. He was lonely because all the people in little boats usually avoided him.
    One hull good, two hulls better.

  10. #20
    Frankie-H's Avatar
    Frankie-H is offline Registered User
    Location : Rural Charente, SW France
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nostrodamus View Post
    Now don't get me wrong because we have found that up to now every boat we have met with Irish people aboard have been the life and soul of the party and you couldn't meet a friendlier people... up to now.

    When you are the only people on a visitors pontoon in a foreign country and another boat comes in that speaks a similar sort of language you tend to say hello.

    Now if that boat contains four Irish males you expect a can of Guinness to be thrust at you before even a word is uttered.
    Not on this occasion. They are the unfriendliest sailors we have met. In fact we have decided they are either all priests or terrorists. I suppose we could find out by sending our son round with a loud ticking clock. Either he or the clock should grab their attention.

    In the time we have been sailing we have always found that other sailors have always been friendly like you have known them forever.

    Have you ever come across another boat that does just not want to say hello or people you think are really suspicious?


    Very sadly, once out in the atlantic islands, they tend to be flying ARC flags. They sometimes think they are very superior and can't be bothered with meer cruising mortals.

    Most cruisers are great and we have many friends from around the world.

    On the subject of the Irish. Do be very careful. We helped an Irish boat into a berth in the marina in Falmouth at about 10.00 in the morning, many years ago. 5 of 'the lads' on board. They would, under no circumstances, take no for an answer. We were coerced on board, where we found that they had already prepared about a dozen bottles of Irish Whisky. We were led astray and made to try them all, at least once, or was it thrice. Wrote off a perfectly good day, if I remember rightly.

    I am just reminded that the tradition was called 'Dockers' in a strong Irish accent. We were told that it would be very rude indeed to go against this noble tradition. Some 15 years later we still raise our glasses to Dockers, when we make landfall.
    Last edited by Frankie-H; 07-04-12 at 16:58. Reason: 'Dockers'
    If you sail by the lee, eventually you will gybe.

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