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  1. #11
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    Mentioning no names, I have sailed in company with a 45 footer that always breaks open the Pimms at midday. Several cases are needed on board for a three month cruise.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  2. #12
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    Dec 2010
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    I'm surprised - even a little disappointed. I'd hoped everyone would be breezily reassuring Phantom18 that he's unduly concerned.

    Dinghying and Jeanneau day-sailing in the Solent in recent years, I and one or two friends would routinely find the bottom of a 1/2 bottle of rum during lunch at sea, and we always felt very hard done-by, when there was no other drink on board.

    We didn't mop it up in crowded waters, or negotiating tough entrances. And definitely not after dark or in fog, when there's already more than enough to cloud perception and judgement. But, we never once came even close to any doubtful or worrying situation.

    Onesea's point bears repeating - it's vital to know your own safe limits.

    Is the question here, actually rather a different one? Aren't we thinking mainly of what the law and law enforcers very warily recommend, and the avoidance of potential culpability, rather than what will actually, significantly affect our ability while sailing?

    Offshore, I don't believe booze at a yacht's wheel justifies remotely the same verboten status of booze in the car. That said, I haven't touched one drop this year for medical reasons, so my own competence needn't be called into question!

  3. #13
    Boathook's Avatar
    Boathook is offline Registered User
    Location : Surrey & boat in Dorset. Both have pubs
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    Oct 2001
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    A 1/2 pint at lunchtime whilst sailing is very nice. The same also with a G&T(not 1/2 pint!) in the evening even on a long voyage. This does depend on weather forecast and actual.

  4. #14
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    Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancrane View Post
    Onesea's point bears repeating - it's vital to know your own safe limits.

    Is the question here, actually rather a different one? Aren't we thinking mainly of what the law and law enforcers very warily recommend, and the avoidance of potential culpability, rather than what will actually, significantly affect our ability while sailing?

    Offshore, I don't believe booze at a yacht's wheel justifies remotely the same verboten status of booze in the car. That said, I haven't touched one drop this year for medical reasons, so my own competence needn't be called into question!
    My only problem with that is that our graveyards have thousands of gravestones as a result of drivers who "knew their own safe limit".

    I certainly don't want to see legislation and I don't want to get high and mighty about it but I have seen too many near misses on the water which were fuelled, in part at least, with booze.

    I don't really know what the answer is. I'm not even sure that there is much of a problem.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Default Moderation in all things!

    I'm not teetotal, nor an alchoholic, I sit somewhere in between. I enjoy good beer, especially in good company. At other times, it very much depends on where, when and who with. There is a certain sense of deep contentment that comes with a nice chilled wine on a summers day (yes even with our weather here) to compliment lunch when at anchor, but never so much that awareness is clouded and judgment impaired.

    As others have said, know your limits, stay within your comfort zone and live to enjoy another day!

  6. #16
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    Lodesman77 is offline Registered User
    Location : Pin Mill/Cambridge
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rigger Mortice View Post
    I don't really know what the answer is. I'm not even sure that there is much of a problem.
    +1

    As sailing is all about your own judgement/responsibility it must be down to the individual. Nothing against an occasional beer on passage in principle, but in fact I don't seem to think about it until the anchor is down...

    -
    ' The gods do not deduct from a man's allotted life span, his days spent sailing '

  7. #17
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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rigger Mortice View Post
    My only problem with that is that our graveyards have thousands of gravestones as a result of drivers who "knew their own safe limit".

    .
    Absolutely right.

    In any case, why take any risk when there are alternatives to booze which are just as pleasant to drink. The only reason for drinking alcoholic drinks is the effect that alcohol has on you so by definition your capabilities are altered by drinking booze.

  8. #18
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    Jan 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodlouse View Post
    You shouldn't drink beer whilst at sea.

    A stiff gin is far better.
    That's the spirit!

    Mike

  9. #19
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    Oct 2006
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    It's all down to you. If you don't feel safe, don't do it. I enjoy an odd beer or stout, but am far more likely to have a wine, scotch, G&T or Austins (Pimms copy).

    I never drink enough to feel woozy, even at home or in the pub. Drink very slowly & savour the flavours, switch to soft drinks if you feel like having several! No problems on the move provided everything is fully under control, a glass of Scotch as we potter down the Straits at the end of a good passage is a lovely treat.

    I think what I would worry about is someone drinking for Dutch courage or constantly refilling a glass. Boats move slowly & the waters are generally far less congested or cluttered than any town centre. Perhaps a lot depends on the speed & size of your boat, a small slow one cannot do a great deal of damage, but a big slow one or a smal fast one can be lethal.

    Would you think twice about using a H/H VHF to call the Marina while helming? I doubt it, but it is illegal to use a phone while driving - the speeds & risk are far higher in a car.
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  10. #20
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    Dec 2010
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    Mentioning that booze and yachts aren't often the inevitably grim combination that booze and cars are, I was definitely thinking about sailing. Given the pace (and lack of crew involvement) which I/C engines permit aboard motorboats, booze must spell greater danger.

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