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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Default Keeping ropes from your prop

    Just seen the latest Rustler 44 roll out of the factory.
    It has a wire from the bottom of the keel to the bottom of the rudder to stop ropes getting up into the prop.

    It still has a cutter fitted, but it seemed like a good "belt and braces" approach to me.
    If I had one fitted perhaps I would not have had to go diving a couple of weeks ago.

    It seems like such a good idea, but not common. Watching all the boats launching in Mylor this week I didn't see a single other one with such a fitting.

    Is there a downside that I haven't considered?
    I may be wrong, but I'm not confused.
    ⛵ Ex-SolentBoy

  2. #2
    Martin_J's Avatar
    Martin_J is offline Registered User
    Location : Portsmouth, UK
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    Default

    Aft strop from the boat hoist (crane)... Could have a problem lifting out.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2004
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    I don't think it would make a big difference as debris can easily be sucked in from the side, it may help if you run across a long piece of line that's quite tight but even then the line/rope will be pulled towards the side of the boat if you have any speed on.
    quicKutter rope cutter, shaft and rudder bearings
    www.h4marine.com

  4. #4
    robertj is offline Registered User
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ex-SolentBoy View Post
    Just seen the latest Rustler 44 roll out of the factory.
    It has a wire from the bottom of the keel to the bottom of the rudder to stop ropes getting up into the prop.

    It still has a cutter fitted, but it seemed like a good "belt and braces" approach to me.
    If I had one fitted perhaps I would not have had to go diving a couple of weeks ago.

    It seems like such a good idea, but not common. Watching all the boats launching in Mylor this week I didn't see a single other one with such a fitting.

    Is there a downside that I haven't considered?
    what a boat wow!

    bob

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Default

    Only the best for Princess Anne

  6. #6
    onesea's Avatar
    onesea is offline Registered User
    Location : Solent based..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ex-SolentBoy View Post
    Just seen the latest Rustler 44 roll out of the factory.
    It has a wire from the bottom of the keel to the bottom of the rudder to stop ropes getting up into the prop.

    It still has a cutter fitted, but it seemed like a good "belt and braces" approach to me.
    If I had one fitted perhaps I would not have had to go diving a couple of weeks ago.

    It seems like such a good idea, but not common. Watching all the boats launching in Mylor this week I didn't see a single other one with such a fitting.

    Is there a downside that I haven't considered?
    Personally I agree it is not likely to be much help..

    On the other hand is that not how they grow muscles, ropes left around under the sea...

    If the boat is for said personnel maybe wire is for other purposes?
    Last edited by onesea; 14-04-12 at 22:03. Reason: To make it make sense....

  7. #7
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    Nov 2007
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    Nothing new, similar things have been tried before, either wire or solid bars as on Vasnvouvers. Not sure there is any real evidence that they are successful. Really depends on what you are trying to avoid - one can see they might push pot lines away or slide over nets. However if you are motoring there is so much water and rubbish being sucked past the prop that it is difficult to see what difference it would make.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by goskar View Post
    Only the best for Princess Anne
    Actually it isn't hers. That one is still in the factory and is looking very good with a navy hull (just like her 36 ) but has some way to go.

    The one that is about to be launched is for a private owner who is downsizing from a bigger boat. She is really going to be a stunner and will be the first Rustler 44 with in-boom furling.

    Hopefully the factory will take some pictures of her sea trials.
    I may be wrong, but I'm not confused.
    ⛵ Ex-SolentBoy

  9. #9
    Stu Jackson is offline Registered User
    Location : Oakland, California outside San Francisco
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    The number of times one gets something caught in their prop is inversely proportional to the length of ownership time.

    Except for that odd time when that law doesn't work.
    Catalina 34 1986 #224 M25 engine 22# Rocna (NZ)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Jackson View Post
    The number of times one gets something caught in their prop is inversely proportional to the length of ownership time.

    Except for that odd time when that law doesn't work.
    <smug mode>
    We've had our boat 9 years and done maybe 20,000 miles. Never had anything in/around the prop. Long keel, offset (folding) prop, no problem.
    </smug mode>

    - W

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