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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    54

    Default Training - some help please

    You won't have heard this one before, so do bear with me. I'm buying a yacht and sailing around the world. I've given myself three years (summers for practical, winters for classroom) to get the experience and knowledge I need, and I see that th RYA prescribes courses as follows:

    Start Yachting - practical
    Essential Navigation & Seamanship (shorebased)
    Competent Crew - practical
    Day Skipper (shorebased)
    Day Skipper - practical
    Coastal Skipper and Yachtmaster (shorebased)
    Coastal Skipper - practical

    Then the real stuff of:

    Yachtmaster Coastal/Offshore/Ocean
    as well as oral and shorebased exams.


    This summer I will be learning to dinghy, as well as pitching in a the yacht club on race days when there is space. I'll be taking the competent crew course abroad in August, but that's about as far as I've thought.

    What advice would you offer in getting the skills I need (not necessarily the bits of paper) to make this a reality?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Solent, Atlantic + E. Med
    Posts
    570

    Default

    Sail as many different boats, with as many different people, in as many different places as possible.

    That will give you depth of experience that will prove invaluable, as well as helping to inform the choice of boat you end up buying. Do some winter sailing as well - that way you're likely to get a wider variety of weather as well as many night hours.

    Although others here may disagree, in my view you are also correct to include formal training -- done well, and combined with a rich variety of other experience, this greatly accelerates learning and helps to minimise gaps in knowledge.
    Last edited by r_h; 20-04-12 at 17:03. Reason: Clarity

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ionian
    Posts
    315

    Default

    It is hard to get sufficient experience in other people's boats. School boats are expensive. Buy a cheap boat as soon as possible. £3K or less spent on a 21 foot boat could save you a fortune and give you experience not just of sailing but also of boat ownership - not the same thing. 25 years ago it it was how most people started. Recently the route is frequently school boats and charters in 36+ foot boats and then the first purchase of a similar size. I freely admit to being a grumpy old dinosaur but the old way worked for a lot of people. Sailing round the world is a massive undertaking. Try sailing round Britain in a small boat first. Suggest reading Ellen McArthur biography.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Me - Zumerzet Boat - Wareham
    Posts
    10,980

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben9000 View Post
    You won't have heard this one before
    Ah! The innocence (probably) of youth.

    What advice would you offer in getting the skills I need (not necessarily the bits of paper) to make this a reality?
    You obviously need some training to get started, but getting sea time in is much more important than getting bits of paper, and you will need an amount of sea time to get Yachtmaster Coastal /Offshore /Ocean
    MontyMariner.co.uk
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    London
    Posts
    5,168

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben9000 View Post
    You won't have heard this one before, so do bear with me. I'm buying a yacht and sailing around the world. I've given myself three years (summers for practical, winters for classroom) to get the experience and knowledge I need,
    As others have said, get out on the water as much as poss. One thing to bear in mind is that the RYA way is very good, but cruising is a different set of skills of which sailing is just one bit. And it´s not something you ever learn, maybe just get used to not knowing what´s around the corner.
    Dinghy sounds a very good idea, get a good feel for how boats behave. So they say anyway, never sailed one meself
    I think what I´m trying to say is that don´t think you´ll walk away from an RYA course "knowing how to sail". Great though they are, the learning really starts once you go out on your own on your own boat. It´s a never ending process of gaining in confidence and lessening of fear

    And cruising´s all about maintenance - how big is your tool kit?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Las Palmas, Gran Canaria
    Posts
    4,470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben9000 View Post
    You won't have heard this one before, so do bear with me. I'm buying a yacht and sailing around the world. I've given myself three years (summers for practical, winters for classroom) to get the experience and knowledge I need, and I see that th RYA prescribes courses as follows:

    Start Yachting - practical
    Essential Navigation & Seamanship (shorebased)
    Competent Crew - practical
    Day Skipper (shorebased)
    Day Skipper - practical
    Coastal Skipper and Yachtmaster (shorebased)
    Coastal Skipper - practical

    Then the real stuff of:

    Yachtmaster Coastal/Offshore/Ocean
    as well as oral and shorebased exams.


    This summer I will be learning to dinghy, as well as pitching in a the yacht club on race days when there is space. I'll be taking the competent crew course abroad in August, but that's about as far as I've thought.

    What advice would you offer in getting the skills I need (not necessarily the bits of paper) to make this a reality?

    Thanks in advance.
    Don't waste time and money on the competent crew course. Save it for the day skipper practical. If you're sailing dinghies and crewing in races you'll have learned more than the comp crew course teaches.
    If you think it's tough at the top---try being at the bottom!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Greece & UK
    Posts
    1,142

    Default

    Experience, experience, experience. Training is accelerated experience but there's nothing like the real thing. Get as much as you can.

    I'll be taking the competent crew course abroad in August
    I would recommend compcrew, we did it and found it very useful - we were total novices than too. BUT I'd advise against doing it in the Med (you don't say where abroad but I've a good idea you mean in the Med). You won't experience tides there, and whilst tidal experience is not that important for compcrew you want to get used to tidal effects and planning for them from the get-go.

    In addition there's a general feeling that if you can sail in the UK you can sail pretty much anywhere!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    north wales
    Posts
    660

    Default

    The problem with RYA courses is that you learn in a false environment. You can all to easily leave a course, waving your piece paper.

    I have always felt RYA courses make you feel over confident. The instructor will be planning his course days in advance, he will know which ports your going to, the tides for that day (off by heart) and the weather. Of course he/she will sit there "pretending" to know nothing.
    The result can be you are given a destination "now get the boat there safely by working out the tides, getting told the dangers and who cares about the weather-it can do what ever it likes.

    You won't be given a chance to make a mistake because you'll be corrected well in advance. So for example if you got the tidal stream an hour out which result in you pushing 2 knots of tide which is not a life threating mistake just an inconvenience, the instructor would correct you and you wouldn't experience your mistake.

    I would be inclined to get a 20 footer boat with a lid, learn the ropes and how to use the motor. Start by letting go of the mooring and quickly picking the line with the boat hook to get practice. Then let go completely, drift back and motor back to mooring buoy. Then take it in small steps just motoring up and down a quite stretch of water progressing to using the sails.

    Read as many books as possible before hand, watch YouTube videos (but take with a pinch of salt)

    Once you can sail on all angles of the wind, motor and pick up a buoy, navigate down an estuary and work out the weather and tides for a particular day, then take the RYA day skipper course.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Winter : Switzerland | Summer : Ionian
    Posts
    379

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben9000 View Post
    You won't have heard this one before, so do bear with me. I'm buying a yacht and sailing around the world. I've given myself three years (summers for practical, winters for classroom) to get the experience and knowledge I need, and I see that th RYA prescribes courses as follows:

    Start Yachting - practical
    Essential Navigation & Seamanship (shorebased)
    Competent Crew - practical
    Day Skipper (shorebased)
    Day Skipper - practical
    Coastal Skipper and Yachtmaster (shorebased)
    Coastal Skipper - practical

    Then the real stuff of:

    Yachtmaster Coastal/Offshore/Ocean
    as well as oral and shorebased exams.


    This summer I will be learning to dinghy, as well as pitching in a the yacht club on race days when there is space. I'll be taking the competent crew course abroad in August, but that's about as far as I've thought.
    ?

    Thanks in advance.
    I learned to sail dinghys as a child. Did nothing more until I was mid-forties, then found myself doing a 3 day yacht course whilst on a Sunsail beach holiday in Greece. I got the bug! Came home and did Day Skipper Theory at local college, followed this up with the practical at a sailing school in Devon. Back to college the following September and did the Coastal Skipper / Yachtmaster theory.

    Atfer this, things get a bit trickier. You need lots of miles, and plenty of them as skipper. You can get miles easily enough by doing flotillas etc, but a club will be a real plus as this will get you night hours and tidal waters, and you really need this stuff.

    So I think you need to do both the RYA stuff and as much sailing as you can get. I do find that a package holiday flotilla Or charter is a good reminder of what I really wanted when it all started - sun and sparkling sea! I'm still learning needless to say, but looking forward to getting my first boat soon.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Stormbound in Carlisle
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Agree with most of the advice so far. You do need bits of paper but most of all you need experience on the water. I also would advise against courses abroad, unless its Gib as you need tidal qualifications if you are to undertake what you are talking about. Don't be put off by doubters, but failing to plan is planning to fail. Live the dream !!!

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