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  1. #31
    Babylon's Avatar
    Babylon is offline Registered User
    Location : Oxfordshire / Solent
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith 66 View Post
    I am in the last throes of refitting a Sabre 27, dirt cheap at 2500, a real basket case, it took 3 years work to bring her back. Now im a boatbuilder by trade so did all the work myself.
    Apart from major expediture like engine, stern gear, rigging, upholstery, windows etc, you then have all the little bits and they add up. At one point last year i was such a regular customer in Dauntless chandlery that i might have well just given Barry my bank account details & got him to empty it every month.
    Though i have all the bills in a folder i have no idea what its really cost, perhaps one day i will tot it all up but id best be sitting down when i do so.
    If you want a good Classic find one thats already been done!
    I have to confess that, once I've made certain that the newly purchased thingy fits/works/etc, I then throw away the reciept every time! And my boat wasn't even a basketcase to begin with!
    http://www.smiletrain.org.uk - charity for child cleft palate surgery

  2. #32
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    Mar 2011
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    I have a 1977 Samphire 26.

    When I was looking to buy three years ago, I decided to look at boats in good, sailable condition rather than 'projects'.

    That meant something with the basic, non-cosmetic but critical items in generally good/recent condition - engine, sails, rigging, hull - and which had been recently sailed rather than left to go mouldy.

    I'd say nine times out of ten it's worth spending a bit more on the initial outlay, as, between two similar yachts, the costs to get a worse boat into the same condition as the better boat will often be far more than the difference in price.

    I'd definitely do the same again; even on a reasonably 'sorted' boat there are loads of little and not-so-little improvements and modifications you'll want to make.

    Oh, and ignore anyone who says 'I wouldn't go to sea without [insert expensive item that wasn't even available until 10/15 years ago]' or breezily refers to their latest boatshow purchase as 'essential' - it usually isn't!

    I'd recommend 'Simpson on Secondhand Boats' and Don Casey's 'Inspecting the Aging Sailboat' (included in his 'Sailboat Maintenance Manual') for good information.

    There are loads of great boats from the 70s/80s, so good luck!

  3. #33
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    Nov 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babylon View Post
    I have to confess that, once I've made certain that the newly purchased thingy fits/works/etc, I then throw away the reciept every time!
    Same - I invested in a shreder just so SWMBO cannot add them all up. Mind you she does say that having a mistress would be less time consuming and cheaper.

    1961 wooden, 2.75K to buy, I spent 6K last year, 8K this year and budgeting 4K next year (rig + other bits) and 6K engine 2013/4. Sailable every year but getting better all the time. One bonus is i know every inch of her and how almost everything 9except the engine) works.
    Last edited by PhillM; 23-04-12 at 20:44.
    Looking for Cheverton boats to feature on http://cheverton.org.uk/

  4. #34
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    Apr 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by she31 View Post
    Lets look at a few boats like Halcyon 26, Contessa 26, Pioneer 9, etc.

    Say you purchase one for around 5K-7K - so at that price she is sailable but a "bit rough".
    Halcyon 26? or do you mean 27

    The problem is what needs altering before you start. Our Halcyon 27 has been heavely modified and done the Atlantic circuit by the previous owners, and a number of big mods were done in the States after crossing the pond.

    If you are looking at a Halcyon27, let me know, you can see what mods you need, could try twisting my arm, and buy a modified one.

    Brian

  5. #35
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    Mar 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by halcyon View Post
    Halcyon 26? or do you mean 27

    The problem is what needs altering before you start. Our Halcyon 27 has been heavely modified and done the Atlantic circuit by the previous owners, and a number of big mods were done in the States after crossing the pond.

    If you are looking at a Halcyon27, let me know, you can see what mods you need, could try twisting my arm, and buy a modified one.

    Brian
    Halcyon, your boat isn't 'Kyon' by any chance?

    There's a lovely photo in one of my books ('The Sailing Cruiser' by WM Nixon) titled 'John and Helen Anderson's Kyon seen in the Galapagos during a round the world cruise which they successfully completed in September 1976'.

    There's also a PBO article from a few years back about the modifications they made.

    In any case, Halcyons seem amazingly well travelled!

  6. #36
    canalcruiser's Avatar
    canalcruiser is offline Registered User
    Location : At anchor mostly
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    A small boat is far safer than a large one however food water and equipent need space and sail power to move

    There was a Dane that sailed a 6 meter around the world reported in Crusing world,Vertues Folkboats contessas(26 Canadian build) All circumnavigated

    You need a well found boat for example a Folkboat the Landrover (60s) of the sea,an EPRN digi vhf safety gear gallons of brandy(for the cooker)paper sea maps a working SSB with winlink or airmail to plot your possition chart plotter GPS perhaps a liferaft(you must learn how to use them)

    And off cash today youll need at least 400 pm of the trip time at sea counts as saving 500 might be better

    NEVER dream then you will buy a deepfreez air con oil lamps but no oil and forget the barrel of good French wine
    ditchcrawling

  7. #37
    G12 is offline Registered User
    Location : West Cornwall
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    Speaking from personal experience of a similar sized/aged boat I would go for the more expensive better kept one every time. I've spent WAY more on my boat than she cost me initially and to make her immaculate I could probably spend the same again! You live and learn.
    The prudent see danger and seek refuge.

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