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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by KellysEye View Post
    >On the other hand, malaria can kill you fast, so you need to understand the risk.

    Having spent time in Malaysia I've never known anyone die of Malaria although getting it is unpleasant and it can recur every few years, ex wife (divorced not dead ;-) had it. Dengue fever (a variation of Malaria also born by Mosquitoes) is a different matter. The death rate is very high. Most mossies come out at night so use 3M Ultrathon repellant which the armed forces use and always use a mossie net at night. That's what I did and had no problems.
    Oh dear!

    Cerebral malaria can kill you within 12 hours of first symptoms. Many tourists do indeed die every year. (And worldwide approximately 3,000 people per day are killed by malaria!)

    Malaria should not recur every few years. Modern drugs eliminate the latent form which hides in the liver.

    Dengue is NOT a variation of malaria. Dengue is a virus, malaria is a protozoon. They are both transmitted by mosquitoes - but different species.
    Last edited by whipper_snapper; 26-04-12 at 15:13.
    Usisafirie nyota ya mwenzio

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by whipper_snapper View Post
    Oh dear!

    Cerebral malaria can kill you within 12 hours of first symptoms. Many tourists do indeed die every year. (And worldwide approximately 3,000 people per day are killed by malaria!)

    Malaria should not recur every few years. Modern drugs eliminate the latent form which hides in the liver.

    Dengue is NOT a variation of malaria. Dengue is a virus, malaria is a protozoon. They are both transmitted by mosquitoes - but different species.
    + 1

    I spent ten years in Tanzania, caught malaria many times and knew many people who died from it - and in one case from the drugs used to cure it - Halfan, now banned.

    I took prophylaxix for some three years and then started getting side effects - persistant mouth ulcers and headaches. Ultimately I was contracting malaria regularly and it really affected my overall wellbeing - it is a REALLY debilitating disease. It does depend where you are - many areas near the coast and in swamps are seriously awful for mossies but in drier and higher areas you may seldom see one.

    As Whippersnappers post falciparum malaria does not recur - but vivax malaria does, its chronic not acute, though its apparently no longer very common.

    Most of the drugs have horrible side effects when used as a cure - one I did use with no effects was Cotecxin (sp?) - not sure if this is still used?

    I have recently been in South Sudan and very surprised by how few mossies there are - but I am still taking prophylactics.

    Malaria likes nothing better than fresh white blood - the expats worst nightmare is getting marlaria when in 'blightly' - the onset of acute symtoms is frighteningly quick and you go from having a 'bad cold' to being essentially in a coma in a matter of hours. I guess the last stage is equally quick but fortunately managed (so far) to avoid this! The thought of going to A+E with it is frightening - you'd be in a box by the time they got the test results back.
    All men dream, but not equally.
    Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds,
    wake in the day to find that it was vanity.
    But the dreamers of the day are dangerous men,
    for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible.
    - T.E. Lawrence -

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Relax View Post
    - the onset of acute symtoms is frighteningly quick and you go from having a 'bad cold' to being essentially in a coma in a matter of hours.
    No kidding.

    Last bout, saw the MO in the morning.
    He diagnosed it as flue.
    By lunchtime I saw black cats on the wardroom ceiling.
    By dinner I was in intensive care.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Relax View Post
    + 1

    I spent ten years in Tanzania, caught malaria many times and knew many people who died from it - and in one case from the drugs used to cure it - Halfan, now banned.

    I took prophylaxix for some three years and then started getting side effects - persistant mouth ulcers and headaches. Ultimately I was contracting malaria regularly and it really affected my overall wellbeing - it is a REALLY debilitating disease. It does depend where you are - many areas near the coast and in swamps are seriously awful for mossies but in drier and higher areas you may seldom see one.

    As Whippersnappers post falciparum malaria does not recur - but vivax malaria does, its chronic not acute, though its apparently no longer very common.

    Most of the drugs have horrible side effects when used as a cure - one I did use with no effects was Cotecxin (sp?) - not sure if this is still used?

    I have recently been in South Sudan and very surprised by how few mossies there are - but I am still taking prophylactics.

    Malaria likes nothing better than fresh white blood - the expats worst nightmare is getting marlaria when in 'blightly' - the onset of acute symtoms is frighteningly quick and you go from having a 'bad cold' to being essentially in a coma in a matter of hours. I guess the last stage is equally quick but fortunately managed (so far) to avoid this! The thought of going to A+E with it is frightening - you'd be in a box by the time they got the test results back.
    I caught cerebral malaria in Angola, was diagnosed by a Portugues doc after a french one said i had hi blood pressure. He gave me the big single tab and said you will be fine, i said bollox to that and got on the big white bird. I went to the GP in Llangollen who sent me straigh to a&e, the maelor in wrexham. no messing there, in to a bed straight away and quinine and tetracycline in massive doses. the consultant said they were well versed in treating it, the pakistani docs were coming back off the home trip with it and they knew how to spot it and treat it.
    It took 3 months to fix, the last test after previous clear tests showed there was still some of the buggerds coming out of my liver. They hit me with the big single tab then and i have never had any probs since. A few years later, a south african here in llan came back from a trip to SA with flu symptoms, he died within a few days.
    Stu

  5. #25
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    That'll be the guy (wine importer?) that lived in Glydy'd' then Stu? Left some young kids & a wife behind!

    Anyway, on the topic a friend of mines son was just treated for Malaria in Gambia and recovered OK. The humble mozzie kills more people every year than any other animal, malaria is a bigger killer than you'd ever believe folks.

    Don't mess with it, it doesn't take any prisoners; remember to keep taking the drugs for a month after you leave as well. If you do get the real bad one, you'll be dead before you have chance in any case (espesially if you in the Atlantic!) but with the others you have a chance if you take precautions.
    Drinking rum and playing music with my friends.

  6. #26
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    Feb 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ariadne View Post
    That'll be the guy (wine importer?) that lived in Glydy'd' then Stu? Left some young kids & a wife behind!

    Anyway, on the topic a friend of mines son was just treated for Malaria in Gambia and recovered OK. The humble mozzie kills more people every year than any other animal, malaria is a bigger killer than you'd ever believe folks.

    Don't mess with it, it doesn't take any prisoners; remember to keep taking the drugs for a month after you leave as well. If you do get the real bad one, you'll be dead before you have chance in any case (espesially if you in the Atlantic!) but with the others you have a chance if you take precautions.
    Correct, he didnt stand a chance, was gob smacked, especially since Id been through it a few years previously.
    Stu

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