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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    813

    Default Material for running back stays.

    Halyards should not stretch but sheets should so should mooring lines so don't use old halyards but what about running back stays which material the old ones are braided but material.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    729

    Default

    ours is non-stretch, same as our halyards.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    443

    Default Dyneema

    Thats what mine are. Before that I had Vectran, but that is a bit vulnerable to UV.

    Low stretch important I think

    Graham

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    +1 for low/non stretch - basically its a shroud
    If you're not confused, you're probably misinformed

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    315

    Default

    Because they are by definition adjustable then it doesnt matter as much as a shroud which most of us leave alone for long periods. However there is no advantage in them stretching. Cost v performance. most cruising boats use doublebraid or marlowbraid. Most racing boats use exotics.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    443

    Default cost

    On my boat they are not very long, and the marginal extra cost of high performance material
    is small. Also, I use highfield levers not a tackle, so adjustability is limited

  7. #7
    Yacht Yogi is offline Registered User
    Location : Downton, Wiltshire
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    187

    Default Why not steel?

    I've been doing some sailing on Sigma 38s and they have steel cable running back stays shackled to a block and tackle at the bottom with halyard-like rope on it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    813

    Default

    Ours are the same ss plus a block and tackle but the rope part is 15m. We will order dyneema or equiv.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    443

    Default No need for wire

    Wire runners can cause all sorts of horrible chafe probs

  10. #10
    wklein's Avatar
    wklein is offline Registered User
    Location : Dartmouth, Devon
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    493

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gdallas View Post
    Wire runners can cause all sorts of horrible chafe probs
    Especially to the rigging, they require more tension to pull out the centenary of the wire.
    Wire doesn't tend to last too long as its often bent and allowed to cycle when stowed.
    In my book dyneema is the way to go, with protection where it touches spreaders.
    Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free


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