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  1. #81
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    As part of their type approval testing, the major manufacturers have to do a set number of hill starts (think it might be 5) within so many minutes (that might be 5 too) on a specified slope, with the vehicle and a trailer laden to Gross Train Weight. The Max. recommended towing weight has as much to do with driveline warranty as with safety. Remember that the manufacturer needs to honour the warranty even if someone buys a car new and runs it at GTW every day of its life in a hilly area!

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxcampbell View Post
    Dylan.

    I haven't read every post in the thread, so apols if I'm repeating something, but...

    Trailing a maximum of 85% or 90% of the car's weight is a good rule of thumb, but every model has a manufacturer's recomended max towing weight (RMTW). German cars tend to have lower RMTW's in relation to the car's weight, don't know why. Others have higher.

    When we were researching what to pull our boat with the car (as opposed to Land Rover / other 4WD) that really stuck out as having a big RMTW relative to it's own weight was the Citroen C5, which (in it's bigger engine models) was rec'd to pull up to 2,500Kg (if memory serves - may not be accurate, but you get the idea).

    I wouldn't recommend a van - b****r to reverse, cos of the visibility. A cheap old reliable heavy car would be fine. If you identify a model, you can google the rec'd towing weight.

    We pull a total of about 1,200Kg with our Volvo V40 (ie the small Volvo estate) 1.9 diesel and it's absolutely fine.
    We did the bit about % of kerb weight 3 pages ago, and came to the conclusion that its a load of rubbish sprouted by tin can pulling geography teachers ***

    Think you have the towing weights wrong way round as well, Citroen C5 Diesel - 1500kg and BMW 320 Diesel 1800kg.

    Anyway, he's decided. Its going to be a Volvo Estate, borrowed from Lovejoy

    *** To be clear I have both towed a Tin Can and been a teacher in the past
    Mark

  3. #83
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    Default oh now he hasn't

    Anyway, he's decided. Its going to be a Volvo Estate, borrowed from Lovejoy

    *** To be clear I have both towed a Tin Can and been a teacher in the past [/QUOTE]

    he has not decided yet

    I did swear that I would never het back into the big trailer sailer faff

    and here I am

    not planning to do too much towing though

    it is really so that I can cut my costs to zero the next time I run out of money

    and a rental truck for 24 hours might be the best way to go

    it will cost me about 250 to rent a pick up truck car and fill it with diesel to ge the boat home the next time the BBC decides to put all the freelances to the sword

    Dylan

  4. #84
    ProDave's Avatar
    ProDave is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by dylanwinter View Post
    it is really so that I can cut my costs to zero the next time I run out of money

    and a rental truck for 24 hours might be the best way to go

    it will cost me about 250 to rent a pick up truck car and fill it with diesel to ge the boat home the next time the BBC decides to put all the freelances to the sword

    Dylan
    That might be true while the boat is down south.

    But wait until later in the journey when you are north of the border, you might find it a tad more expensive to get the boat all the way back down south.

    Hint, it would be cheaper to join a sailing club up here and make use of their moorings / storage facilities, than tow the boat hundreds of miles.
    Anybody else sail a Frolic 18? or know someone who does? if so please PM me.

  5. #85
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    Razorfish is offline Registered User
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    Hi Dylan,

    I was thinking about your conundrum today whilst driving my commercial TD5 Defender around town.

    These are great for working offroad and towing but as an everyday car they are awful - noisy, juicy, heavy great lumps.

    It struck me that 4x4s are pretty much a prerequisite for towing up slippy or less than great slipways but less so for straight towing. As you will only be towing a couple of times per year you could save your money on 4x4 ownership (cost and diesel) and simply get the boat lifted out by a boat yard or towed up the slip by a friendly local 4x4 owning forumite. Many boat yards/clubs have tractors to do the latter.

    My second thought, after filling up, was consider the running costs the rest of the year before you buy yourself a towing car - my TD5 only does about 30mpg and the annual fuel bill would be crippling if I didn't pass on the cost - if you run an economical car you may end up still saving money in comparison even if you hire a van/car for towing a couple of occasions.

    You certainly got a discussion going here didn't you? I sort of zoned out of the technical/legal stuff, but then I am a bit dense.

    Cheers,

    Andy

    PS you have got me looking at alternative vehicles now. She's going to kill me.
    Fifteen men on a dead man's chest
    Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum

  6. #86
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    Default distance

    Quote Originally Posted by ProDave View Post
    That might be true while the boat is down south.

    But wait until later in the journey when you are north of the border, you might find it a tad more expensive to get the boat all the way back down south.

    Hint, it would be cheaper to join a sailing club up here and make use of their moorings / storage facilities, than tow the boat hundreds of miles.
    I agree

    and I really do not intend to do too much towing for the upper parts of the journey

    although this summer I might have to do a fair bit


    taking the minstrel to the swap over place, bringing the slug home then delivering it to the new owner

    bringing the boat back home for the winter

    and then back again

    that is five movements at 250 a time for a rental vehicle


    D

  7. #87
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    onesea is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by dylanwinter View Post
    I agree

    and I really do not intend to do too much towing for the upper parts of the journey

    although this summer I might have to do a fair bit


    taking the minstrel to the swap over place, bringing the slug home then delivering it to the new owner

    bringing the boat back home for the winter

    and then back again

    that is five movements at 250 a time for a rental vehicle


    D
    Once up there you may also find all you need to do is supply trailer and some one will have a 4x4, and a spare corner of yard or field they can spare.

  8. #88
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    Default my thoughts exactly

    Quote Originally Posted by onesea View Post
    Once up there you may also find all you need to do is supply trailer and some one will have a 4x4, and a spare corner of yard or field they can spare.
    you are dead right of course

    or I could rent a vehicle up there

    but my guess is that I could find a corner to put it in

    however, not planning to run out of work or money.... never expect it to happen

    D

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Razorfish View Post
    My second thought, after filling up, was consider the running costs the rest of the year before you buy yourself a towing car - my TD5 only does about 30mpg and the annual fuel bill would be crippling if I didn't pass on the cost - if you run an economical car you may end up still saving money in comparison even if you hire a van/car for towing a couple of occasions.
    A few years back I had a V8 Range Rover for an occasional bit of towing. I worked out that it would be cheaper over the year to buy a second, more economical car for every day use, tax it, have a second insurance policy and the extra set of maintenance than run the 15mpg Range Rover as my only car. In fact I went out and did just that.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by neale View Post
    A few years back I had a V8 Range Rover for an occasional bit of towing. I worked out that it would be cheaper over the year to buy a second, more economical car for every day use, tax it, have a second insurance policy and the extra set of maintenance than run the 15mpg Range Rover as my only car. In fact I went out and did just that.
    Yep, I did exactly the same, but I must be a bit tighter than you cos I bought an oil burning Rangie.
    Mark

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