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  1. #21
    Coaster is online now Registered User
    Location : Warwickshire home/ Pembrokeshire boat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    I think that fitting an electric bilge pump is a sign of irrational fear of sinking; all it will do is flatten the battery before you sink.
    Not if your boat is connected to a mains electricity supply and a sufficiently sophisticated device is charging the batteries connected to the automatic bilge pump(s).

    Then you worry instead about stray currents, electrolytic action and failure of hull fittings...

  2. #22
    photodog is offline Lord High Commander of Upper Broughton and Gunthorpe
    Location : Coming soon to a theatre near you...
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    Quote Originally Posted by galadriel View Post
    Never give sinking a second thought.
    Yeah, thats what captain smith said as well....

    And the skipper of the Hans Hedtoft....

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by galadriel View Post
    Never give sinking a second thought.
    I sink you should.
    'The lyf so short
    the arte so long to lerne.'

  4. #24
    Minn's Avatar
    Minn is offline Registered User
    Location : East coast UK. Mostly. Philippines in winter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coaster View Post
    Not if your boat is connected to a mains electricity supply and a sufficiently sophisticated device is charging the batteries connected to the automatic bilge pump(s).

    Then you worry instead about stray currents, electrolytic action and failure of hull fittings...
    That takes me back... to a big floating dock... built to dock battleships in WW2 , that we had just bought a few years earlier...rat got in junction box one night.... rat fried... next morning our dock was on the bottom - luckily without a ship in it!

    There were - we counted them - 724 cement boxes in the bottom tanks, but a certain Classification Society saw nothing wrong with her! !

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    No but I'm paranoid about the boat falling over when she's on the hard,I check the belt-and-braces scaffolding cradle daily.It's always ok,so I worry about the heavy Vancouver next door blowing over and knocking my boat over (Vancouver propped up with sticks), Also hate working on side decks on land,guaranteed broken bones if you slip off. Sinking,just keep the cocks closed and don't sail into shipping containers when asleep simples! Jerry at 0300 waiting for the crash.

  6. #26
    galadriel's Avatar
    galadriel is offline Registered User
    Location : Chichester Harbour
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    Quote Originally Posted by parsifal View Post
    I sink you should.
    Galadriel is an Etap!
    "You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today
    And then one day you find ten years have got behind you"
    Roger Waters 1972

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    Just to add that our club once had a boat which took on a lot of water over a long period, would have sunk if someone hadn't noticed it was floating a bit low. Cause was a pinhole leak in the engine cooling system and the engine cooling water seacock left open.

    And on electric auto bilge pumps: generally will not shift water fast enough to deal with a disintegrated skin fitting, and I take the point about flat batteries; on the other hand, a typical pump is claimed to shift about 500 gallons (ie about 2 tons)/hour using about 2.5 amps, if your battery has about 100 amp-hours that's a lot of water.

    And, yes, I'm paranoid about sea cocks and even more paranoid about gas.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    I know of a flotilla engineer who put the fresh water hose in the filler, turned it on and got distracted, after an extended lunch (about 8pm) he came back to find the boat sat on the mud with the Mediterranean about 6 inches from flooding over the side deck.
    Someone had taken the inspection hatch off the fresh water tank!
    Dried out and back on flotilla the next week, thank goodness for shallow waters.
    Beneteau First 31.7 owners Site http://www.beneteaufirst317.webs.com/

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Default paranoid you bet i am

    yep, i worry sick all the time, sea cocks are probably the main worry even though theyre checked off daily, followed by gas, which is a bit stupid as i only have a little bottle for the barbie, followed by anchor dragging, rigging failure engine failure engine room fire, wiring shorts, i think it,ll be worse when i get out of the boatyard and afloat !!!!!!!!

  10. #30
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    Sep 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Lazy Kipper View Post
    Does anyone else suffer from an irrational fear of their boat sinking when it's unattended? I go round closing seacocks that haven't spilled a drop but I still fear them spontaneously failing. I find it hard to have more than a week go by without a visit - just to check. We fitted an auto bilge pump with an alarm loud enough for half the marina to hear. I've even taken to giving the stern gland greaser a couple of turns before we leave "just in case".

    Am I mad?
    To ask the question is to answer it
    www.guapa.pn
    Be realistic - aim for the impossible!

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