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  1. #1

    Default whole gale? Half a gale?

    Roger Taylor, in his excellent "Mingming" book refers to the wind force as "a whole gale" or "half a gale".

    Does anyone know what these terms denote? I've consulted Professor Google but it's a bit vague and the answers seem to be anywhere between F6 - F10.

  2. #2
    Woodlouse's Avatar
    Woodlouse is offline Registered User
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    A whole gale is a F8.

    Given that the effects of wind is exponential I'd have said half a gale would be a F6 or so.

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    I'd tend to agree with that.

    Of course, strictly speaking, a F6 is merely a strong breeze, a F8 a gale and a F9 a severe gale. How one interprets them in practice, however, rather depends on the extent of one's LWL and experience.

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    Just to confuse the issue, I seem to remember an F7 referred to as a ' Yachtsman's gale ' .

    Don't hear the phrase much these days though...........

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    I use the Nathan scale to simplify things.

    N1: Yay, this is fun
    N2: Don't like this
    N3: Bugger.
    http://onkudu.com 4 years living on a 21ft boat. 1 month on a 32ft.

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    Tmacd is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanlee View Post
    I use the Nathan scale to simplify things.

    N1: Yay, this is fun
    N2: Don't like this
    N3: Bugger.
    I like that! Simplicity appeals to my brain!

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    Default Half Gale and Getting Caught Out in A Fresh Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by grendy View Post
    Roger Taylor, in his excellent "Mingming" book refers to the wind force as "a whole gale" or "half a gale".

    Does anyone know what these terms denote? I've consulted Professor Google but it's a bit vague and the answers seem to be anywhere between F6 - F10.
    The link below is from the UK Meterological Office who have produced a fact sheet on the history of the Beaufort Scale. The term half gale doesn't appear in the history. However, Force 7 is a "near gale", was once called a "moderate gale". There are lots of other gale terms as well: -

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pd...fort_Scale.pdf

    The term half gale doesn't appear in this history but I would assume it was a Force 7. There appears to be a lot of descriptions around this wind speed which is getting towards brown pants territory. Why settle for a wipe out in a Strong Breeze, when a Half Gale sounds like a better excuse. Based on nothing more than avoiding embarrassing explanations at the club bar, I think Woodlouse probably is right, the F6 (which I believe is the Yachtsmans's gale) is the half gale of legend.
    Having time is unavoidable.

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    onesea's Avatar
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    Half a Gale I would of put as F7.

    If I HAD TO put a number on it.

    Other wise its probably N2-N3

    The winds your out in and really did not plan on being out there in...

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    I've heard F6 referred to as a Fisherman's gale, and F7 as the Yachtsman's gale. Good thing we've got some numbers to keep things consistent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephenh View Post
    Just to confuse the issue, I seem to remember an F7 referred to as a ' Yachtsman's gale ' .

    Don't hear the phrase much these days though...........
    I though that was an F6 - hold on I'll Google it.

    Yep, Google seems to think it's an F6 as well.

    Richard

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