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  1. #21
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    Mar 2012
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    Default Elephants's graveyard?

    I must confess to occasional thoughts on mortality. My own vessel is getting on in years, and the boat is not far behind. Is there a here after for yachts?

    From the the number of GRP boats for sale that are 40, 50 or even 60 years old, still mostly in a serviceable condition, I can only say that they will be with us for many years.

    The drop in value has as much to do with changes in design (obsolescence) and status as in real value or life expectancy. Mine will certainly outlive me.

    While a boat has an owner prepared to look after her, she will still have a place on the water amongst all the new builds.

  2. #22
    Twister_Ken's Avatar
    Twister_Ken is offline Registered User
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    We could sink them in Studland, to discourage yotters from anchoring and disturbing the sea horse.
    Next time, it'll all be different.

  3. #23
    Fantasie 19's Avatar
    Fantasie 19 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twister_Ken View Post
    We could sink them in Studland, to discourage yotters from anchoring and disturbing the sea horse.
    ... and at the same time providing a new marine environment for their predators...
    Never knowingly undersailed...
    http://hurley20sparrow.blogspot.com/

  4. #24
    prv is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ex-SolentBoy View Post
    SWMBO has just challenged me saying that sailing GRP boats is environmentally unfriendly
    Sailing them isn't, but buying new ones may be.

    Fortunately I'm unlikely ever to do that

    Pete

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    3,337

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ex-SolentBoy View Post
    SWMBO has just challenged me saying that sailing GRP boats is environmentally unfriendly, particularly AWB's.

    Her reasoning is that as they are so cheap when they depreciate it does not make economic sense to refurbish them.

    So, we end up with a pile of GRP.

    Are old GRP hulls recycled?
    If so, how?
    If not, where is the big pile of dead ones?
    I think boats generally get upgraded and refurbished for donkey's years. My boat is 39 years old, but the engine, seacocks, standing rigging, and upholstery are six years old. It's just about to get a new sprayhood and sail cover and probably dodgers. I'm sure that it's got an indefinite number of years of life in it, provided it doesn't actually sink.

    It's a MAB rather than an AWB now, but as a version of the Catalina 27, it would have been as AWB as they come in 1973.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    79

    Talking old. boats go to die......

    I'll tell you where old boats go to die........the Isle of Man! Ramsey, Douglas and Peel, there's loads!
    Always seem to be waiting for the tide.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by AuldSot View Post
    I think boats generally get upgraded and refurbished for donkey's years. My boat is 39 years old, but the engine, seacocks, standing rigging, and upholstery are six years old. It's just about to get a new sprayhood and sail cover and probably dodgers. I'm sure that it's got an indefinite number of years of life in it, provided it doesn't actually sink.

    It's a MAB rather than an AWB now, but as a version of the Catalina 27, it would have been as AWB as they come in 1973.
    Thinking triggers broom here, "its the same broom I've had for 30 years; mide you its had a few new heads but I only needed to change the handle twice."

    There was a great thread on classicboat a while back discussing when does a original boat cease to be original and become a replicia.


    % change?
    Changed over time?
    Changed from original spec (like adding / changing engine)?
    In the same airspace?
    Dismantle and rebuild - is that still original etc.

    Fasinating and never concluded.

    Nowadays, when asked "how old is your boat" I now answer "depends" - i.e which bit do yu want to date?

    Same as when asked "how long" which of course depends what you are counting as lentgh and who you're talking to
    Last edited by PhillM; 09-05-12 at 12:53.
    Looking for Cheverton boats to feature on http://cheverton.org.uk/

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    No body really knows how long GRP boats will last. Old 60s and 70 s hulls were usually seriously stronger than needed. later boats were more intelligently built and better resins have been developed.

    My boat and all its major parts ,spars etc is 39 years old and showing no sign of giving up the ghost yet. In fact I would say there is nothing of the same size available new today that I would really prefer to own.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
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    In Florida, a couple of years ago, I came across a firm that ground the GRP hulls up, mixed it with Tarmac, and built roads out of the result - something we could well copy in the UK.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephenh View Post
    In Florida, a couple of years ago, I came across a firm that ground the GRP hulls up, mixed it with Tarmac, and built roads out of the result - something we could well copy in the UK.
    No, we've got enough roads.
    Next time, it'll all be different.

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