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  1. #11
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty John View Post
    Essential equipment on Minnie:

    Lovely just the idea

  2. #12
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by dylanwinter View Post
    I always keep a rbolly on the boat

    helpful in so many ways

    it gives me full standing headroom when standing in the hatch

    it shades the food when it is hot and we are eating in the cockpit

    it is ideal for those trips to the loo

    windbreak

    boat defense

    Dylan

    I have seen a good few of your videos, if you ever head for florida you might want to visit this rather special place.

    http://coralcastle.com/


    Also better appreciated when you take a look on youtube.

  3. #13
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Dogs Pollacks Brother View Post
    I live and boat in Wales........we don't need sun protection.


    I plan to see wales while on my boat at some point

  4. #14
    WilliamUK is offline Registered User
    Location : Manchester, UK
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    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Croak View Post
    We used ours as a mini sail for pulling up to the pontoon with a slight breeze behind. Shut the brolly the power is off.


    Also sailed down the canals with one but less successful as I was steering with an oar. one hand on the brolly the other on the oar.
    Parasol, light airs.
    Golf brolly, light breeze.
    Ordinary brolly, gentle breeze.
    Compact gents brolly, moderate breeze.
    Child's brolly, fresh breeze.
    Tiny little clown's brolly, strong breeze.
    Cocktail brolly, near gale.

    Imagine the size of the sail locker if you wanted to carry actual sails for the same job. Such a simple system too. If you were quick you could switch sizes up or down in lulls or gusts to keep the approach speed really smooth and steady.
    William
    Blithe Spirit - Lark 1804.

  5. #15
    robmcg's Avatar
    robmcg is offline Registered User
    Location : Gloucestershire
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    Sep 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Dockrell 22 View Post
    I have a large steel tank to get out and im waiting till the finances allow to get more tools.

    Have also started tearing the old foam padding out.

    The grp has been repaired in places in a very poor way, its been allowed to wrinkle and ripple and set.
    Hi Ben

    I was just wondering what the rationale is removing the toilet and plumbing and the tanks, will that not make using the boat more problematic when its afloat?
    Rob

  6. #16
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmcg View Post
    Hi Ben

    I was just wondering what the rationale is removing the toilet and plumbing and the tanks, will that not make using the boat more problematic when its afloat?
    Rob

    Hello Rob

    I will use a nice extra wide commode

    i have been informed i might be required to have a sealed container when visiting other countries though thats about it. I think a plumed in toilet is unneccessary so much prefer to get rid tbh.

  7. #17
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamUK View Post
    Parasol, light airs.
    Golf brolly, light breeze.
    Ordinary brolly, gentle breeze.
    Compact gents brolly, moderate breeze.
    Child's brolly, fresh breeze.
    Tiny little clown's brolly, strong breeze.
    Cocktail brolly, near gale.

    Imagine the size of the sail locker if you wanted to carry actual sails for the same job. Such a simple system too. If you were quick you could switch sizes up or down in lulls or gusts to keep the approach speed really smooth and steady.


    LOL Might just try this!

  8. #18
    robmcg's Avatar
    robmcg is offline Registered User
    Location : Gloucestershire
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    I would be inclined to keep it as they function much better as a receptacle than a wayward bucket! Holding tanks are not a legal requirement for visiting yachts in most of europe, but could quite easily be added to your boat at a later time. RM 69 marine toilets have an optional wrap around tank that fits around the toilet bowl. Believe me, when it comes to onboard creature comforts, you will regret not having a plumbed in loo.

  9. #19
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmcg View Post
    I would be inclined to keep it as they function much better as a receptacle than a wayward bucket! Holding tanks are not a legal requirement for visiting yachts in most of europe, but could quite easily be added to your boat at a later time. RM 69 marine toilets have an optional wrap around tank that fits around the toilet bowl. Believe me, when it comes to onboard creature comforts, you will regret not having a plumbed in loo.
    If you have one or two commode buckets and strong reuseable liners you can do 1,s and 2,as keeping them seperate which also avoids spashback.

    With a plumbed in toilet even without a rough sea you can get "splashback"

    You really dont want whats just come out going back

    Perhaps one or two ultraviolet lamps as well to kill bacteria.

    With liners you have the means to tie it up and leave it if theirs a priority.

  10. #20
    rob2 is offline Registered User
    Location : Hampshire UK
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    Aug 2005
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    I have a GRP tube on the pushpit, originally for a DIY danbuoy. It now serves to keep a boathook ready to hand or holds a garden parasol. One warning, though - attach a lanyard, it's really embarassing rowing like fury chasing an inverted parasol...

    Rob.

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